Daily Archives: April 18, 2013

NV Energy Receives Industry Recognition for Solar Energy Adoption

http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnc/20100825/LA55163LOGO

WASHINGTON, April 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — NV Energy, Inc. (NYSE: NVE) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) today announced that NV Energy has been recognized as a national leader in the integration and delivery of solar-based renewable solutions. NV Energy has been ranked…

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Lebanon Hopes Gulf Arabs Will Revitalize Tourism Industry

A new Lebanese government’s best hope of rebooting its battered economy may lie in efforts to persuade wealthy Gulf Arab tourists to return after a boycott last year, but it is a gargantuan task. read more

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Experts Work to Beef Up Gulf of Guinea Security

Experts are working to beef up security in the Gulf of Guinea, through which an estimated 40 percent of Europe’s oil imports and 29 percent of U.S.-bound petroleum products pass annually.
 
According to a report from the International Maritime Bureau, the gulf located off the central part of the West African coastline is becoming a new hot spot for piracy, with potential to eclipse the scale of high-seas crime seen off the Horn of Africa. Fifty-eight pirate attacks were recorded …

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Life Inside The Most Densely Populated Place On Earth [Infographic]

A former military fort controlled by the Triads, Kowloon Walled City was demolished 20 years ago. Here’s what life was like there. read more

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Zetas Cartel Is Recruiting Americans

Treasury Department chart of Los Zetas wikimedia commons

Los Zetas, an infamous Mexican cartel, is apparently lowering its standards–it’s now recruiting Americans. read more

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Disputed signs of consciousness seen in babies’ brains

Infants display neural responses linked to visual awareness by 5 months of age

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Most Earthlike planets yet seen bring Kepler closer to its holy grail

Compared with our world, globes are slightly larger and orbit a smaller star

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News in Brief: Bats are 3-D cartographers

Special cells in the mammal’s brain chart its path as it flies

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Infants, whether mice or human, love to be carried

Being toted around calms and quiets babies of both species

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FOR KIDS: Infectious animals

Critters spread many germs that can sicken each other — and even kill people

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Find Out, For Better Or Worse, What Music Your Twitter Friends Like

Twitter #Music screenshot by Dan Nosowitz Twitter’s new music app creates a playlist of the music that’s blowing up on your Twitter feed. But is that the kind of music you want to listen to?

Twitter released its music service today, for web and iOS devices like the iPhone. It taps into your Twitter feed to recommend music through four channels, the most interesting of which is “NowPlaying,” made up of the stuff the people you follow have tweeted about. If you have a paid Rdio or Spotify subscription, you can then listen to the full tracks as a kind of Twitter-curated playlist. It’s slick and simple and works really well! read more

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Kepler Search Finds Two New Cozy, Possibly Watery Planets Around Faraway Star

Kepler-62f Kepler-62f, which is 1.41 times the size of Earth, is in just the right spot for liquid water to exist–if it is rocky and has an atmosphere. NASA Scientists can’t know for sure if the worlds have water. But they could, making them a potential habitat for life.

In our solar system, only one world has just the right size, just the right temperature and just the right home for liquid water. Long ago, at least one other rocky planet had water, too, but it’s gone now; Mars dried up and turned to rust. A distant moon called Europa has a lot of water, but too far from the sun’s warmth, the moon remains frozen. Closer in, Mercury and Venus are too hot to keep it. read more

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New App Tells Icelanders If Their Hookup Qualifies As Accidental Incest

Don’t Kiss Strangers In Iceland Wikimedia Commons In a small country, you’ve got to be careful about keeping it in the family.

The world can seem like a mighty small place, but nowhere more so than in Iceland, a country of 320,000 people where getting it on with a relative isn’t even a question–the question is, how distantly? Thanks to a new app that warns users if they’re too closely related, Icelandic daters can now go to bed feeling a little more assured that they won’t eventually run into their one night stand at a family reunion. read more

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Super-Fast New Telescope Solves Star Birth Mystery

ALMA Galaxies This image shows six of the most fertile galaxies in the early universe as seen by ALMA (in red). The red circles indicate the regions where galaxies had been detected by a less-sensitive telescope setup called APEX. The earlier telescope did not have sharp enough images to pin down the identity of the galaxies, but ALMA does. The ALMA observations, at submillimeter wavelengths, are overlaid on an infrared view of the region as seen by the Spitzer Space Telescope (blue). ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), APEX (MPIfR/ESO/OSO), J. Hodge et al., A. Weiss et al., NASA Spitzer Science Center ALMA is the best way to see these births in super-fertile galaxies, which helps scientists understand how galaxies form.

Birth is messy, for stars as for anything else, and it can be hard for astronomers to see through the dirt and crud. This is especially true in distant, very old galaxies, which also happen to be some of the most fertile galaxies. To better understand how stars in these galaxies are born, astronomers need to see through the dust surrounding them–the interstellar afterbirth, if you will. This takes a telescope that can see long wavelengths of light, around one millimeter. It takes a telescope with some soul. read more

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