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“In each market where wind energy is being developed, the state is a big player in the initial stages of industry development and is often the sponsor of pilot projects.”

Posted on 08 May 2013 by Africa Business

Exclusive interview with Dr Emelly Mutambatsere, Principal Regional Economist, African Development Bank, and a speaker at the upcoming Clean Power Africa

1) You are the co-author of a comprehensive document on Africa’s wind energy market – can we start with a short summary of how it has evolved over the years?

The harnessing of wind energy for electricity production on commercial scale started in Africa in the late 1990s. Our study shows that the first commercial scale wind farms were commissioned in 2000/2001 in Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. This was after over a decade of pilot testing with Egypt as the trail blazer.

Between 1990 and 2010, wind energy installed capacity increased twelve fold to reach 1.1 Giga Watts in 2011. While the annual growth rate of Africa’s installed capacity was almost twice the growth of global capacity during the same period, it remains similar to the growth rate reported for global capacity when wind took-off on the global market. This growth followed a phased approach, whereby countries lacking familiarity with the technology and having limited geo-referenced data started with pilot projects, migrating to semi-commercial projects, before reaching full-fledged commercial scale. The average project size has also increased over time, while the lead time achieving commercial scale has decreased.

But overall, wind energy markets in Africa remains small in absolute terms and the importance of wind in the energy mix is limited, at less than 1 percent of continent’s total installed generation capacity. This is not expected to significantly change in the medium term given the significant concurrent development of installed capacity from conventional energy source.

2) Which structural characteristics affected the development of wind energy projects?

Taking the presence of wind energy potential as given, four key factors affect the uptake of wind energy. Firstly, the physical attributes of wind – in particular its intermittency which translates into variable electricity output – affect the role that wind can effectively play in the generation mix, and add complexity to the integration of wind-based power plants into conventional electricity grids, including the need for back-up capacity.

Secondly, the level of electrification observed in African countries with strong wind energy potential matters. Those countries that have reached high electrification rates are more amiable to adopting wind energy which they use to increase available electricity generation capacity in both peak and off-peak periods, thus improve reliability of service. On the other hand, countries trying to reach access objectives, and cannot rely solely on wind to achieve this objective given its aforementioned physical attributes, have opted for conventional energy resources which a provide a stable base-load capacity.

Third, the business environment is important. We observe that fast growing wind energy markets have benefited from strong political will, supported by strategic policy direction and an enabling business environment, including industry specific legislation. Finally, while harnessing wind energy improves the environmental footprint of African power systems, we do not see climate change benefits being an overriding driver of market development on the continent. Other factors such as achieving energy security, by improving diversity of the electricity generation mix and/or increasing use of locally available energy resources, appear to take precedence. This is because Africa still makes a meager contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, an underdeveloped market for carbon tips the scale against wind in simple economic and financial comparisons with conventional energy resources.

3) The paper provides the first mapping of the continent’s wind energy market – can you give us a summary of this, where are the most developed markets, which areas have most potential etc.?

A wind energy potential mapping exercise conducted by the African Development Bank in 2004 shows that coastal countries have the best wind from a wind speed perspective. This includes (in no particular order) Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia and Mauritania in North Africa; Djibouti, Eretria, Seychelles and Somalia in the East; and South Africa, Lesotho and Madagascar in the South. Another study we reference in the paper identifies Kenya and Chad as also having large inland wind energy potential. Central and West Africa are shown to have limited potential.

We observed in conducting this study that wind energy potential is a dynamic concept which evolves with the industry’s technology advancement. It is also important in discussing this concept to clearly define the type of potential being measured: whether on-shore or off-shore, whether the physical upper limit of the energy resource or the convertible potential considering technological, structural and ecological constraints. The ranking of countries by potential follows suite. For example, a study which evaluates technical potential ranks Somalia, Sudan, Libya, Egypt, Madagascar, Kenya and Chad as being among the top 30 countries on global scale.

Looking at the developed potential at end-2011, we see strong concentration of wind energy capacity in three North African countries – Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. Egypt held half of the continent’s total installed capacity, followed by Morocco with 40% and Tunisia with 5%. Outside of North Africa, there is commercial capacity in Cape Verde, and limited capacity in South Africa, Kenya, Mauritius, Eritrea and Mozambique.

The market’s outlook is also noteworthy. Our survey produced a comprehensive sample of about 60 ongoing and planned wind energy projects on the continent. This places South and East African markets in the lead in terms of market growth. South Africa alone is expected to contribute a third of the wind energy capacity currently under developed or planned in Africa; and Kenya is making significant strides toward developing what is poised to be the continent’s largest wind power project. This trend is attributed to increased strategic focus on wind in these regions, whilst in the North market development has been stalled by socio-economic instability.

4) What do African countries need to take into consideration when developing wind projects?

First, there is need to develop a national champion to promote the industry, offering a single focal point for regulation, financing and oversight. In Egypt, the New and Renewable Energy Agency (NREA) was specifically established to play this role. Elsewhere, the existing power utility or a division therein was used.

Second, the wind energy market is attractive to private developers provided clear legislation exists to support the market. This includes rebalancing the scale in cases where subsidies exist on fossil fuels in order to improve competitiveness of renewable technologies.  In addition to legislative support, the state should focus on kick-starting market development by supporting research and development, developing comprehensive geo-referenced datasets required for feasibility studies, and funding pilot projects.

It is important for countries to choose an industry development model which serves the country’s energy sector needs best. Country experiences have thus far been different among market leaders: while some countries opted for a state utility sponsored market development path (e.g. Egypt), others have used a blend of public and private sponsorship of projects including by industrial users (e.g. Morocco) and still others, a competitive private sector led path (e.g. South Africa). The same is true for choice of pricing model (whether a predetermined feed-in tariff, direct negotiation or price competition). The different approaches reflect different priorities and local preferences.

Finally, most African countries developing renewable energy markets are hoping for farther reaching results including industrialization and job creation. Countries pursing this secondary goal should support local linkages, including local manufacturing of turbines and turbine components, as an integral part of their wind sector strategy. Examples of best practice in the respect are still limited.

5) What did you find regarding funding of such projects?

In each market where wind energy is being developed, the state is a big player in the initial stages of industry development; and is often the sponsor of pilot projects.  Donor financing is also very visible in these initial stages. As the market matures, we see the profile of both sponsors and financiers evolving, from public entities and grant financing, to public-private / private entities and non-concessional financing. However, the market has not yet developed to the point where it can be fully funded by the private sector, therefore development finance institutions remain major players.

6) What will be your main message at Clean Power Africa?

Africa’s wind energy market has developed at a pace similar to that observed in leading markets at the early stages of their industry development. Despite this progress and the presence of significant potential on the continent, we should not expect wind to take over conventional energy resources in terms of share in the electricity generation mix, as key structural characteristics of the market affect both efficacy in addressing the energy access challenge, and competitiveness of wind, relative to non-renewable energy resources. Countries seeking to develop this market should do so deliberately and be intent on supporting early market development. However given the urgency with which most governments must address the more pressing access needs, conventional solutions will more likely be adopted ahead of, or concurrently with, wind energy.

7) What are you most looking forward to at the event in Cape Town?

I always look forward to interacting with practitioners and policy makers in these forums. It is an opportunity to learn from them how institutions such as AfDB can best serve as a partner in Africa’s development.

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Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017

Posted on 06 February 2013 by Africa Business

NEW YORK, Feb., 2013  /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017
http://www.reportlinker.com/p0397016/Refining-Industry-Outlook-in-Middle-East-and-Africa-2013—Capacity-Analysis-Forecasts-and-Details-of-All-Operating-and-Planned-Refineries-to-2017.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Oil_and_Gas_energy

Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017

Summary

GlobalData’s energy offering, “Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017” is the essential source for industry data and information relating to the refining industry in Middle East and Africa. It provides asset level information relating to active and planned refineries in Middle East and Africa. The details of major companies operating in the refining industry in Middle East and Africa are included in the report. The latest news and deals relating to the sector are also provided and analyzed.

This report is built using data and information sourced from proprietary databases, primary and secondary research and in-house analysis by GlobalData’s team of industry experts.

Scope

– Updated information relating to all active and planned refineries
– Provides historical data from 2005 to 2012, forecast to 2017
– Information on refining, FCC, hydrocracking and coking capacities by refinery and country
– Provides operator information for all active and planned refineries
– Identifies key trends and issues in the refining industry
– Information on the top companies in the sector including business description and strategic analysis. Key companies covered are National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Saudi Arabian Oil Company and Kuwait National Petroleum Company
– Product and brand updates, strategy changes, R&D projects, corporate expansions and contractions and regulatory changes.
– Key mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, private equity investments and IPOs.

Reasons to buy

– Obtain the most up to date information available on all active and planned refineries in Middle East and Africa
– Identify growth segments and opportunities in the industry.
– Facilitate market analysis and forecasting of future industry trends.
– Facilitate decision making on the basis of strong historic and forecast refinery and unit capacity data.
– Assess your competitor’s refining portfolio and its evolution
– Understand and respond to your competitors business structure, strategy and prospects.
– Develop strategies based on the latest operational, financial, and regulatory events.
– Do deals with an understanding of how competitors are financed, and the mergers and partnerships that have shaped the market.
– Identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the leading companies in Middle East and Africa.

Table of Contents

1 Table of CContents 2
1.1 List of Tables 8
1.2 List of Figures 10
2 Introduction 11
2.1 What is This Report About? 11
2.2 How to Use This Report? 11
2.3 Market Definition 11
3 Middle East And Africa Refining Industry 12
3.1 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Overview 12
3.1.1 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Key Data 12
3.1.2 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Total Refining Capacity 12
3.2 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry: Trends and Issues 15
3.2.1 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry: Key Drivers and Issues 15
3.3 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) 17
3.3.1 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran), Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 17
3.3.2 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran), Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 19
3.3.3 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran), Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 20
3.4 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia 21
3.4.1 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 21
3.4.2 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 22
3.4.3 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 23
3.4.4 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 24
3.5 Refining Industry in Kuwait 24
3.5.1 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 25
3.5.2 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 25
3.5.3 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 26
3.5.4 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 26
3.6 Refining Industry in Iraq 26
3.6.1 Refining Industry in Iraq, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 27
3.6.2 Refining Industry in Iraq, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 28
3.6.3 Refining Industry in Iraq, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 28
3.7 Refining Industry in Egypt 29
3.7.1 Refining Industry in Egypt, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 29
3.7.2 Refining Industry in Egypt, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 30
3.7.3 Refining Industry in Egypt, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 30
3.8 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates 31
3.8.1 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 31
3.8.2 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 32
3.8.3 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 32
3.9 Refining Industry in Algeria 33
3.9.1 Refining Industry in Algeria, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 33
3.9.2 Refining Industry in Algeria, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 34
3.10 Refining Industry in South Africa 34
3.10.1 Refining Industry in South Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 35
3.10.2 Refining Industry in South Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 35
3.10.3 Refining Industry in South Africa, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 36
3.11 Refining Industry in Nigeria 36
3.11.1 Refining Industry in Nigeria, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 37
3.11.2 Refining Industry in Nigeria, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 38
3.12 Refining Industry in Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 38
3.12.1 Refining Industry in Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 39
3.13 Refining Industry in Israel 39
3.13.1 Refining Industry in Israel, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 40
3.13.2 Refining Industry in Israel, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 40
3.13.3 Refining Industry in Israel, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 41
3.14 Refining Industry in Qatar 41
3.14.1 Refining Industry in Qatar, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 41
3.14.2 Refining Industry in Qatar, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 42
3.15 Refining Industry in Bahrain 42
3.15.1 Refining Industry in Bahrain, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 42
3.15.2 Refining Industry in Bahrain, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 43
3.15.3 Refining Industry in Bahrain, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 43
3.16 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic 43
3.16.1 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 44
3.16.2 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 44
3.16.3 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 45
3.17 Refining Industry in Sudan 45
3.17.1 Refining Industry in Sudan, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 45
3.17.2 Refining Industry in Sudan, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 46
3.17.3 Refining Industry in Sudan, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 46
3.17.4 Refining Industry in Sudan, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 47
3.18 Refining Industry in Oman 47
3.18.1 Refining Industry in Oman, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 47
3.18.2 Refining Industry in Oman, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 48
3.18.3 Refining Industry in Oman, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 48
3.19 Refining Industry in Morocco 49
3.19.1 Refining Industry in Morocco, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 49
3.19.2 Refining Industry in Morocco, Fluid catalytic cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 50
3.19.3 Refining Industry in Morocco, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 50
3.20 Refining Industry in Yemen 51
3.20.1 Refining Industry in Yemen, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 51
3.21 Refining Industry in Jordan 52
3.21.1 Refining Industry in Jordan, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 52
3.21.2 Refining Industry in Jordan, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 52
3.21.3 Refining Industry in Jordan, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 53
3.22 Refining Industry in Cote d’Ivoire 53
3.22.1 Refining Industry in Cote d’Ivoire, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 53
3.22.2 Refining Industry in Cote d’Ivoire, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 54
3.23 Refining Industry in Kenya 54
3.23.1 Refining Industry in Kenya, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 54
3.24 Refining Industry in Cameroon 55
3.24.1 Refining Industry in Cameroon, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 55
3.24.2 Refining Industry in Cameroon, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 55
3.25 Refining Industry in Ghana 56
3.25.1 Refining Industry in Ghana, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 56
3.25.2 Refining Industry in Ghana, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 56
3.26 Refining Industry in Angola 57
3.26.1 Refining Industry in Angola, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 57
3.27 Refining Industry in Tunisia 57
3.27.1 Refining Industry in Tunisia, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 58
3.28 Refining Industry in Senegal 58
3.28.1 Refining Industry in Senegal, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 58
3.29 Refining Industry in Zambia 59
3.29.1 Refining Industry in Zambia, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 59
3.30 Refining Industry in Gabon 59
3.30.1 Refining Industry in Gabon, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 60
3.31 Refining Industry in Republic of the Congo 60
3.31.1 Refining Industry in Republic of the Congo, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 60
3.31.2 Refining Industry in Republic of the Congo, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 61
3.32 Refining Industry in Chad 61
3.32.1 Refining Industry in Chad, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 61
3.33 Refining Industry in Republic of Niger 62
3.33.1 Refining Industry in Republic of Niger, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 62
3.33.2 Refining Industry in Republic of Niger, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 62
3.34 Refining Industry in Republic of Guinea 63
3.34.1 Refining Industry in Republic of Guinea, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 63
3.35 Refining Industry in Uganda 63
3.35.1 Refining Industry in Uganda, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 63
3.36 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Planned Refining Facilities 64
3.36.1 Refining Industry in Middle East and Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, Planned Refining Facilities 64
4 Profile of National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company 65
4.1 National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Key Information 65
4.2 National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Company Overview 65
4.3 National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Business Description 65
4.3.1 Business Overview 65
5 Profile of Saudi Arabian Oil Company 67
5.1 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Key Information 67
5.2 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Company Overview 67
5.3 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Business Description 67
5.3.1 Business Overview 67
5.3.2 Exploration 68
5.3.3 Oil Operations 69
5.3.4 Refining and Chemicals 69
5.4 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 70
5.4.1 Overview 70
5.4.2 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Strengths 71
5.4.3 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Weaknesses 73
5.4.4 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Opportunities 73
5.4.5 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Threats 75
6 Profile of Kuwait National Petroleum Company 76
6.1 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Key Information 76
6.2 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Company Overview 76
6.3 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Business Description 76
6.3.1 Business Overview 76
6.4 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, SWOT Analysis 77
6.4.1 Overview 77
6.4.2 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Strengths 78
6.4.3 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Weaknesses 78
6.4.4 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Opportunities 79
6.4.5 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Threats 80
7 Financial Deals Landscape 81
7.1 Detailed Deal Summary 81
7.1.1 Acquisition 81
7.1.2 Private Equity 85
7.1.3 Equity Offerings 86
7.1.4 Debt Offerings 87
7.1.5 Partnerships 90
7.1.6 Asset Transactions 95
8 Recent Developments 96
8.1 Strategy and Business Expansion 96
8.1.1 Oct 14, 2012: IOC To Help Raise Output At Nigerian Refineries 96
8.1.2 Sep 01, 2012: Orient Petroleum To Start New Refinery In Anambra State By 2013 96
8.1.3 Jul 02, 2012: Nigeria Signs MoU With Vulcan Petroleum To Build Six Refineries With $4.5 Billion Investment 96
8.1.4 May 21, 2012: PetroSA Signs JSA With Sinopec Group On Project Mthombo 96
8.1.5 Mar 05, 2012: RasGas Opens New Office At Ras Laffan In Qatar 97
8.2 Other Significant Developments 98
8.2.1 Jan 23, 2013: Kuwait To Partially Shut Mina Abdullah Refinery Units For Maintenance 98
8.2.2 Jan 09, 2013: Iran To Build Natural Gas Refinery With $1.6 Billion Investment 98
8.2.3 Jan 01, 2013: Petro Rabigh To Halt Operations At Saudi Refinery For Necessary Maintenance 98
8.2.4 Dec 17, 2012: Eni To Invest $8 Billion Over Next 10 Years To Develop Libyan Operations 98
8.2.5 Dec 05, 2012: Chevron Announces $36.7 Billion Capital And Exploratory Budget For 2013 99
8.2.6 Dec 03, 2012: Suncor Energy Provides Update On 2013 Capital Spending Plan And Production Outlook 101
8.2.7 Dec 03, 2012: NNPC Shuts Kaduna Refinery For Two Weeks Due To Routine Maintenance 102
8.2.8 Nov 06, 2012: Orpic Resumes Operations At Mina Al Fahal Refinery 102
8.2.9 Nov 05, 2012: Kuwait To Invest $100 Billion On Oil Projects In Next Five Years 102
8.2.10 Oct 29, 2012: Sasol And Total Natref Refinery Shut For Planned Maintenance 102
8.2.11 Oct 21, 2012: QInvest Arranges $200m Syndicated Facility For Tupras, Turkey 103
8.2.12 Oct 17, 2012: Nigeria To Invest NGN251 Billion On Refinery Upgrades 103
8.2.13 Sep 26, 2012: KNPC Resumes Operations At Mina Al-Ahmadi Refinery In Kuwait 103
8.3 New Contracts Announcements 104
8.3.1 Nov 14, 2012: Saudi Aramco Signs Contracts For Jazan Refinery And Terminal Project In Saudi Arabia 104
8.3.2 Jan 04, 2012: PMFG Secures Three New Project Awards Totaling $11m 105
9 Appendix 106
9.1 Abbreviations 106
9.2 Methodology 106
9.2.1 Coverage 106
9.2.2 Secondary Research 107
9.2.3 Primary Research 107
9.3 Contact Us 107
9.4 Disclaimer 108

List of Tables

Table 1: Middle East And Africa Refining Industry, Key Statistics, 2012 12
Table 2: Middle East And Africa, Refining Capacity by Country (MMTPA), 2005-2017 12
Table 3: Middle East And Africa, Refining Capacity by Company (MMTPA), 2005-2017 14
Table 4: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 17
Table 5: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 (Contd. 1) 18
Table 6: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 19
Table 7: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 20
Table 8: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 21
Table 9: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 (Contd.1) 22
Table 10: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 22
Table 11: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 23
Table 12: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 24
Table 13: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 25
Table 14: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 25
Table 15: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 26
Table 16: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 26
Table 17: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Iraq (MMTPA), 2005-2017 27
Table 18: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Iraq (MMTPA), 2005-2017 28
Table 19: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Iraq (MMTPA), 2005-2017 28
Table 20: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Egypt (MMTPA), 2005-2017 29
Table 21: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Egypt (MMTPA), 2005-2017 30
Table 22: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Egypt (MMTPA), 2005-2017 30
Table 23: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in United Arab Emirates (MMTPA), 2005-2017 31
Table 24: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in United Arab Emirates (MMTPA), 2005-2017 32
Table 25: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Cracking Unit Capacity in United Arab Emirates (MMTPA), 2005-2017 32
Table 26: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Algeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 33
Table 27: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Algeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 34
Table 28: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in South Africa (MMTPA), 2005-2017 35
Table 29: Middle East And Africa, Fluid catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in South Africa (MMTPA), 2005-2017 35
Table 30: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in South Africa (MMTPA), 2005-2017 36
Table 31: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Nigeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 37
Table 32: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Nigeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 38
Table 33: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (MMTPA), 2005-2017 39
Table 34: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Israel (MMTPA), 2005-2017 40
Table 35: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Israel (MMTPA), 2005-2017 40
Table 36: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Israel (MMTPA), 2005-2017 41
Table 37: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Qatar (MMTPA), 2005-2017 41
Table 38: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Qatar (MMTPA), 2005-2017 42
Table 39: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Bahrain (MMTPA), 2005-2017 42
Table 40: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Bahrain (MMTPA), 2005-2017 43
Table 41: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Bahrain (MMTPA), 2005-2017 43
Table 42: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Syrian Arab Republic (MMTPA), 2005-2017 44
Table 43: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Syrian Arab Republic (MMTPA), 2005-2017 44
Table 44: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Syrian Arab Republic (MMTPA), 2005-2017 45
Table 45: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 45
Table 46: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 46
Table 47: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 46
Table 48: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 47
Table 49: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Oman (MMTPA), 2005-2017 47
Table 50: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Oman (MMTPA), 2005-2017 48
Table 51: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Oman (MMTPA), 2005-2017 48
Table 52: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Morocco (MMTPA), 2005-2017 49
Table 53: Middle East And Africa, Fluid catalytic cracking Unit Capacity in Morocco (MMTPA), 2005-2017 50
Table 54: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Morocco (MMTPA), 2005-2017 50
Table 55: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Yemen (MMTPA), 2005-2017 51
Table 56: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Jordan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 52
Table 57: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Jordan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 52
Table 58: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Jordan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 53
Table 59: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Cote d’Ivoire (MMTPA), 2005-2017 53
Table 60: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Cote d’Ivoire (MMTPA), 2005-2017 54
Table 61: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Kenya (MMTPA), 2005-2017 54
Table 62: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Cameroon (MMTPA), 2005-2017 55
Table 63: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Capacity in Cameroon (MMTPA), 2005-2017 55
Table 64: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Ghana (MMTPA), 2005-2017 56
Table 65: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Ghana (MMTPA), 2005-2017 56
Table 66: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Angola (MMTPA), 2005-2017 57
Table 67: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Tunisia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 58
Table 68: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Senegal (MMTPA), 2005-2017 58
Table 69: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Zambia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 59
Table 70: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Gabon (MMTPA), 2005-2017 60
Table 71: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Republic of the Congo (MMTPA), 2005-2017 60
Table 72: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Republic of the Congo (MMTPA), 2005-2017 61
Table 73: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Chad (MMTPA), 2005-2017 61
Table 74: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Republic of Niger (MMTPA), 2005-2017 62
Table 75: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Republic of Niger (MMTPA), 2005-2017 62
Table 76: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Republic of Guinea (MMTPA), 2005-2017 63
Table 77: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Uganda (MMTPA), 2005-2017 63
Table 78: Middle East And Africa, Planned Crude Distillation Unit Capacity (MMTPA), 2013-2017 64
Table 79: National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Key Facts 65
Table 80: Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Key Facts 67
Table 81: Saudi Arabian Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 71
Table 82: Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Key Facts 76
Table 83: Kuwait National Petroleum Company, SWOT Analysis 77
Table 84: Sonangol Plans To Acquire 16.65% Interest In Galp Energia From Eni 81
Table 85: Arab Petroleum Sells 12.5% Stake In Bahrain National To Boubyan Petrochemical For $30 Million 82
Table 86: SOCAR To Acquire 24% Stake In SOCAR & Turcas Energy 83
Table 87: BP And Shell Plans To Sell Its Stake In SAPREF 84
Table 88: Qatar Holding Acquires Additional Stake In Total 85
Table 89: Oando Plans Public Offering Of Shares For $220.5 Million 86
Table 90: Oando Plans For Private Placement 86
Table 91: Tupras Files Prospectus For Public Offering Of Bonds For $1 Billion 87
Table 92: Dolphin Energy Completes Public Offering Of 5.5% Bonds Due 2021 For $1,300 Million 88
Table 93: Saudi Aramco Total Refining and Petrochemical Completes Public Offering Of Islamic Bond For $1,000 Million 89
Table 94: National Iranian Oil Plans To Issue Bonds For $15,000 Million 90
Table 95: Qatar Petroleum To Form Partnership To Develop Oil Refinery In Egypt 90
Table 96: Republic of Equatorial Guinea Plans To Form Partnership With Sinopec To Develop Refining And Petrochemical Complex 91
Table 97: PetroSA Enters Into Partnership With Sinopec To Build Oil Refinery In Africa 92
Table 98: Oman Oil Forms Joint Venture With International Petroleum Investment 93
Table 99: Sinopec Forms Joint Venture With Saudi Aramco 94
Table 100: PetroSA Plans To Acquire Downstream Energy Assets 95

List of Figures

Figure 1: Middle East and Africa, Country Wise Share Vis-à-vis Growth in Refining Capacity (%), 2007-2012 13
Figure 2: Middle East and Africa, Company Wise Share Vis-à-vis Growth in Refining Capacity (%), 2007-2012 14

Companies Mentioned

National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company
Saudi Arabian Oil Company
Kuwait National Petroleum Company

To order this report:
Oil_and_Gas_energy Industry:
Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017

__________________________
Contact Nicolas: nicolasbombourg@reportlinker.com
US: (805)-652-2626
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IOM Aids Internally Displaced in Sudan’s Darfur Jebel Amir Gold Mining Area and Returning Chadian Migrant Workers

Posted on 05 February 2013 by Africa Business

GENEVA, Switzerland, February 5, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ IOM is currently transporting over 125 metric tonnes of emergency assistance including plastic sheeting, sleeping mats, beds, mattresses and mosquito nets to an estimated 100,000 people displaced by fighting in north Darfur’s Jebel Amir district.

The assistance, which also includes primary health care and rapid response kits, medical tents, nutrition items for malnourished adults and children, cartons of soap and animal feed, is expected to reach the areas of Kabkabiya, Saraf Omra, Sireif and Ghara Zawiya from Khartoum by road in the next few days.

More than 100 people have been killed and some 70,000 have fled their homes in the Jebel Amir gold mining areas following clashes between the Beni Hussein and Aballa tribes over the control of several gold mines.

Labour migrants from neighbouring Chad have also been caught up in the fighting, with many fleeing to the West Darfur State town of El Geniena. IOM is particularly concerned about the plight of some 1,500 destitute migrants currently living without shelter or assistance. Others have found temporary refuge in some of the town’s mosques

IOM is also working with the Chadian authorities to provide assistance to Chadian gold miners who have crossed the border and are currently stranded in Adre, a mountainous area close to the border with Darfur.

“Many of the returning Chadian migrant workers lost all their possessions and had their money stolen during the fighting and resulting displacement in the Jebel Amir area,” says Qasim Sufi, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Chad. “Without the means to buy a bus ticket home, many remain stranded in remote and inhospitable areas.”

In coordination with UNOCHA and WFP, IOM is providing food for arriving migrants and onward transportation to their final destinations. As the migrants are arriving from a yellow fever-prone region, local health authorities are working with IOM to ensure that migrants are vaccinated before departure.

 

SOURCE

International Office of Migration (IOM)

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Land wealth and administration to stimulate economic development in Africa

Posted on 01 February 2013 by Thandisizwe Mgudlwa

By Thandisizwe Mgudlwa

The securing of land titles will reduce poverty and enhance economic development on the African continent – experts declare.

In Kampala, Uganda recently, IGN France International, the leader of the international consortium engaged in the Design, Supply, Installation, Implementation of the Lands Information System and Securing of Land Records (DeSIILISoR) project in Uganda, organized a regional conference in Kampala, Uganda (January 17th and 18th) on the theme:

“Modernization of land administration and management systems Implementation of Land Information Systems (LIS): sharing experiences, innovations and good practices.”

An official conference report reveals that the the official opening of the conference was attended by the Vice-President of the Republic of Uganda Edward Sekandi; the Minister of the Land, Housing and Urban Development (MLHUD) Daudi Migereko, three Ministers of State (secretaries of state), the Ambassador of France, and representatives from the World Bank.

The report further shows that theparticipation of such prominent representatives clearly demonstrated the level of importance that Ugandan and the international authorities attribute to the issue of land in general and to the DeSILISoR project in particular.

Frank Byamugisha, the World Bank representative explained that the Bank had financed more than 60 land projects over the past 20 years to a total value of US$2.7 billion.

He discussed the development benefits of these cross-cutting projects and explored the economic (natural resources management, urban planning) and sociological (gender issues) benefits to countries that initiate them.

Byamugisha also highlighted the direct objectives of the World Banks interventions: improving tenure security over communal land, improving tenure security over individual land, increasing access and tenure for the poor and vulnerable, increasing efficiency and transparency in land administration services, developing capacity in land administration, resolving land disputes and managing expropriations,increasing scope and effectiveness of land use planning, improving public land management, developing post-conflict land administration and strengthening valuation functions and land tax policies.

In addition, more than 180 participants from over ten different African countries participated in the conference. Representatives from Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Kenya, Malawi, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Togo, France, United Kingdom and the Netherlands attended the conference with full delegations from Ivory Coast, Chad and Libya.

The strong participation in this conference clearly reflects the strong interest in West Africa and East to secure land and developing the potential of land and natural resources.

And the consortium charged with the implementation of the DeSIILISoR project led by IGN France International brought together 10 companies involving 30 international experts to digitalize 16,000 cadastral maps and 500,000 and titles.

The conference also provided an opportunity for the people involved in the project to share experiences and the various components of the project including the establishment of a National Land Information Centre (NLIC), the design and implementation of a land information system (LIS) in Uganda, the conversion of land records, data integration, training and capacity building, and the implementation of a public information and awareness communication were all presented in detail.

Feedback from each member of the consortium on the different aspects and the main difficulties encountered during the 3 year project were an important element of the plenary session and presented a road map of the main issues to take into account when starting these ambitious and complex land projects.

A presentation of regional issues was made by the Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and country specific presentations were made by land specialists from Burundi, Tanzania, Kenya and Malawi.

Throughout the two day conference, discussions focused on technical issues related to the choice of the solutions adopted, the methodologies to be implemented and the technical equipment installed.

Other topics included issues of protection against hacking, the importance of training local people, the communication targeting administrative staff and the public, and the importance of measuring concrete benefits of such projects and their returns on investment.

Several presentations had focused on the use of aerial photography or satellite imagery in cadaster projects. As the cost of a geographic dataset depends heavily on its accuracy, it is essential to define the data sources that will be used for the establishment of the cadastral reference from the start.

Picking up a key point of discussion on the theme of the added value of NSDI projects for developing countries at the regional conference IGN France International held in April 2012 in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) the link between land projects and National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) was also addressed. Land projects are sometimes considered the cornerstone of NSDI initiatives, the report added

However the situation varies considerably from one country to another. Clear links exist between LIS projects and NSDI initiatives; however, some countries initiated NSDI projects without systematic land initiatives, while others have taken advantage of LIS projects to develop national spatial data infrastructure.

Most agreed that the highest authorities must play a determining role in the definition of public policies legal frameworks and the way these projects move forward. Without this strategic vision, both LIS and NSDI projects encounter difficulties fail to get off the ground or are not become sustainable.

Also, the completion of a geographic data set appears to be an essential component for both LIS or NSDI projects and should be taken into account from the very beginning.

In her final intervention, the Minister of Lands insisted on the added value of the LI project led by IGN France International. Securing land titles will reduce poverty and enhance economic development in Uganda.

Land insecurity presents an obstacle to economic and social development. In Uganda, a World Bank study revealed that the average delay for the registration of titles was 270 days. It is in this context that the Ugandan Government wished to modernise its procedures. IGN France International won a tender for the securing of property titles through the development of an unique land information system for the 6 departmental offices of the districts of Kampala, Mukono, Wakiso, Jinja, Masaka and Mbarara, as well as the establishment of a national land information centre.

While, IGN France International was created in 1986 and is the international subsidiary of the French IGN (National Institute of Geographic and Forest Information). Over the years, the company has shown itself to be an indispensable player in both of its sectors of intervention: geographic information (acquisition, processing, modelling) and geographic information systems (implementation and integration). It works on all types of projects in the following fields: Cadastre and land administration, urban planning, energy, environment, risk management, water, security/precision work, agriculture.

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Land Administration: Success for the Regional Event in Kampala

Posted on 24 January 2013 by Africa Business

 

KAMPALA, Uganda, January, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ IGN France International (http://www.ignfi.com), the leader of the international consortium engaged in the Design, Supply, Installation, Implementation of the Lands Information System and Securing of Land Records (DeSIILISoR) project in Uganda organized a regional conference in Kampala, Uganda (January 17th and 18th) on the theme:

“Modernization of land administration and management systems Implementation of Land Information Systems (LIS): sharing experiences, innovations and good practices.”

The official opening of the conference was attended by the Vice-President of the Republic of Uganda Edward Sekandi; the Minister of the Land, Housing and Urban Development (MLHUD) Daudi Migereko, three Ministers of State (secretaries of state), the Ambassador of France, and representatives from the World Bank. The participation of such prominent representatives clearly demonstrated the level of importance that Ugandan and the international authorities attribute to the issue of land in general and to the DeSILISoR project in particular.

Frank Byamugisha, the World Bank representative explained that the Bank had financed more than 60 land projects over the past 20 years to a total value of US$2.7 billion. He discussed the development benefits of these cross-cutting projects and explored the economic (natural resources management, urban planning) and sociological (gender issues) benefits to countries that initiate them. Byamugisha also highlighted the direct objectives of the World Banks interventions: improving tenure security over communal land, improving tenure security over individual land, increasing access and tenure for the poor and vulnerable, increasing efficiency and transparency in land administration services, developing capacity in land administration, resolving land disputes and managing expropriations, increasing scope and effectiveness of land use planning, improving public land management, developing post-conflict land administration and strengthening valuation functions and land tax policies.

Desilisor KLA parcels

 

More than 180 participants from over ten different African countries participated in the conference. Representatives from Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Kenya, Malawi, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Togo, France, United Kingdom and the Netherlands attended the conference with full delegations from Ivory Coast, Chad and Libya. The strong participation in this conference clearly reflects the strong interest in West Africa and East to secure land and developing the potential of land and natural resources.

The consortium charged with the implementation of the DeSIILISoR project led by IGN France International brought together 10 companies involving 30 international experts to digitalize 16,000 cadastral maps and 500,000 and titles. The conference provided an opportunity for the people involved in the project to share experiences and the various components of the project including the establishment of a National Land Information Centre (NLIC), the design and implementation of a land information system (LIS) in Uganda, the conversion of land records, data integration, training and capacity building, and the implementation of a public information and awareness communication were all presented in detail.

Feedback from each member of the consortium on the different aspects and the main difficulties encountered during the 3 year project were an important element of the plenary session and presented a road map of the main issues to take into account when starting these ambitious and complex land projects. A presentation of regional issues was made by the Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and country specific presentations were made by land specialists from Burundi, Tanzania, Kenya and Malawi.

Throughout the two day conference, discussions focused on technical issues related to the choice of the solutions adopted, the methodologies to be implemented and the technical equipment installed. Other topics included issues of protection against hacking, the importance of training local people, the communication targeting administrative staff and the public, and the importance of measuring concrete benefits of such projects and their returns on investment. Several presentations focused on the use of aerial photography or satellite imagery in cadaster projects. As the cost of a geographic dataset depends heavily on its accuracy, it is essential to define the data sources that will be used for the establishment of the cadastral reference from the start.

Picking up a key point of discussion on the theme of the added value of NSDI projects for developing countries at the regional conference IGN France International held in April 2012 in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) the link between land projects and National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) was also addressed. Land projects are sometimes considered the cornerstone of NSDI initiatives. However the situation varies considerably from one country to another. Clear links exist between LIS projects and NSDI initiatives; however, some countries initiated NSDI projects without systematic land initiatives, while others have taken advantage of LIS projects to develop national spatial data infrastructure.

Most agreed that the highest authorities must play a determining role in the definition of public policies legal frameworks and the way these projects move forward. Without this strategic vision, both LIS and NSDI projects encounter difficulties fail to get off the ground or are not become sustainable. The completion of a geographic data set appears to be an essential component for both LIS or NSDI projects and should be taken into account from the very beginning.

In her final intervention, the Minister of Lands insisted on the added value of the LI project led by IGN France International. Securing land titles will reduce poverty and enhance economic development in Uganda.

Download “Implementation-land-information-system-Uganda-Land-Administration”: http://www.apo-mail.org/ignien.pdf

More details on the regional conference and the programmes will be available at:
http://www.lis-uganda.go.ug and at http://www.ignfi.com

About the DeSILISoR project – Land insecurity presents an obstacle to economic and social development. In Uganda, a World Bank study revealed that the average delay for the registration of titles was 270 days. It is in this context that the Ugandan Government wished to modernise its procedures. IGN France International won a tender for the securing of property titles through the development of an unique land information system for the 6 departmental offices of the districts of Kampala, Mukono, Wakiso, Jinja, Masaka and Mbarara, as well as the establishment of a national land information centre.

About IGN France International – IGN France International (http://www.ignfi.com) was created in 1986 and is the international subsidiary of the French IGN (National Institute of Geographic and Forest Information). Over the years, the company has shown itself to be an indispensable player in both of its sectors of intervention: geographic information (acquisition, processing, modelling) and geographic information systems (implementation and integration). It works on all types of projects in the following fields: Cadastre and land administration, urban planning, energy, environment, risk management, water, security/precision work, agriculture.

SOURCE

IGN France International

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Africa – Mobile Broadband, Data and Mobile Media Market

Posted on 18 September 2012 by Africa Business

 

NEW YORK, Sept., 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Africa – Mobile Broadband, Data and Mobile Media Market

http://www.reportlinker.com/p0183041/Africa—Mobile-Broadband-Data-and-Mobile-Media-Market.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Broadband

African mobile operators make up to 30% of their revenues with non-voice servicesWherever 3G mobile broadband services are deployed in sub-Saharan Africa, they quickly take over as the preferred means of access to the internet, provided that a suitable backbone network is in place. DSL services offered by national telcos on their typically underdeveloped fixed-line networks are quickly reduced to niche market status, as are most traditional ISPs reselling these services or offering their own wireless access.

The extensive national network infrastructure of the mobile operators and their large user bases for voice services place them in a dominant market position for data services as well. The additional revenue is welcome in an environment of shrinking average revenue per user (ARPU) in the mobile voice market.

In many countries in the region, national fibre backbone networks are being rolled out, and new international submarine fibre optic cables along the continent’s East and West coast are providing the bandwidth needed to connect millions to the internet, at much lower cost than previously when satellites were the only option. In many cases the mobile operators are building their own fibre backbones under converged licensing regimes.

North Africa has traditionally been in a slightly better position in terms of fixed networks, but even here mobile broadband is quickly outgrowing other access methods. Mobile broadband prices are often comparable to fixed broadband offerings or at least not far behind. In Morocco, Africa‘s most penetrated DSL market with some of the lowest prices on the continent, 3G mobile broadband jumped from virtually zero to over 40% of all connections within two years after launch and made up more than 80% by mid-2012.

Using dual carrier DC-HSPA+ technology, up to 42Mb/s are currently being offered by 3G mobile operators in Africa. The continents first commercial LTE 4G networks have been launched in Angola, Namibia, Mauritius and Tanzania, with South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya and Egypt expected to follow soon. Problems with frequency spectrum allocation have delayed commercial LTE services in some countries.

The arrival of low-cost smartphones, locally manufactured in Ethiopia for example, has lowered the barrier of entry to the internet market for African consumers. South Africas leading operator Vodacom has seen the number of smartphones on its network grow at almost twice the rate of 3G USB modems, reaching a combined total of more than six million or 20% of the subscriber base in early 2012. Average smartphone data usage almost doubled in the past year to reach 92MB per month.The highest number of active mobile broadband subscriptions as a percentage of the population is found in Ghana, at 23% in early 2012.

Mobile broadband and data services also make a significant contribution to the revenues of African cellcos. Leading operator Safaricom in Kenya made almost 30% of its revenue with non-voice services in 2011/12. More than half of this was generated by its tremendously successful M-Pesa mobile banking service, with the other half roughly evenly split between SMS and mobile broadband.

In the continent’s most advanced markets, m-commerce, mobile content, applications and media have reached a level of development that is beginning to foster an associated advertising and marketing industry.

Market highlights:
UMTS-based 3G mobile networks have been launched in more than half of all African countries;Most operators have included High Speed Packet Access (HSPA) 3.5G mobile broadband in their service offerings, providing up to 42Mb/s;Commercial LTE 4G services have been launched in four countries, with trials of the technology ongoing in several others;Another 3G technology, CDMA2000 1x EV-DO has been deployed in around 30 African countries, offering up to 3Mb/s;There are significantly more 3G mobile broadband users than DSL subscribers in key African markets;New international fibre optic cables and national backbone networks support broadband growth;African mobile operators make up to 30% of their revenues with non-voice services;Mobile data services have helped to reverse declining average revenue per user (ARPU);The M-Pesa mobile banking service in Kenya carries about 20% of the countrys entire GDP.Data in this report is the latest available at the time of preparation and may not be for the current year.

1. Mobile Broadband Penetration2. Algeria2.1 Market Overview2.2 Mobile statistics2.3 Regulatory issues2.3.1 Registration of subscriber details2.4 Wireless broadband2.4.1 WiMAX and WiFi2.4.2 EV-DO2.5 Mobile broadband2.6 Broadband via satellite2.7 Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 20163. Angola3.1 Market Overview3.1.1 Third generation (3G) mobile data services3.1.2 Satellite mobile3.2 Forecast mobile market – 2013; 20164. Benin4.1 Market Overview4.1.1 Mobile statistics4.1.2 EV-DO4.1.3 WiMAX4.1.4 WiFi4.1.5 3G and 4G5. Botswana5.1 Market Overview5.1.1 Mobile statistics5.2 Wireless broadband5.3 WiMAX5.3.1 Orange Livebox5.3.2 Netspread5.4 Third generation (3G)6. Burkina Faso6.1 Market Overview6.1.1 Mobile statistics6.1.2 EV-DO6.1.3 WiMAX6.1.4 Broadband via satellite6.1.5 Third generation (3G)7. Burundi7.1 Market Overview7.1.1 Mobile statistics8. Cameroon8.1 Market Overview8.1.1 Mobile statistics8.1.2 Wireless broadband8.1.3 Satellite mobile8.2 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 20169. Chad9.1 Market Overview9.1.1 Mobile statistics9.2 Satellite mobile10. Cote d’Ivoire10.1 Market Overview10.1.1 Mobile statistics10.2 WiFi10.3 WiMAX10.4 Mobile data services10.4.1 SMS10.4.2 MMS10.4.3 GPRS/EDGE10.5 Mobile content and applications10.5.1 M-payments10.6 Satellite mobile11. Democratic Republic of Congo11.1 Market Overview11.1.1 Mobile statistics11.1.2 Regulatory issues11.1.3 Mobile data overview12. Djibouti12.1 Market Overview12.1.1 Mobile statistics13. Egypt13.1 Market Overview13.1.1 Telecom Egypt’s mobile deal13.1.2 Third mobile licence13.1.3 Fourth mobile licence13.1.4 Mobile statistics13.2 Regulatory issues13.2.1 Tariffs13.2.2 International gateways13.2.3 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)13.2.4 Registration of user details13.2.5 GPS ban13.3 Wireless broadband13.3.1 WiFi13.3.2 WiMAX13.3.3 CDMA2000 1x EV-DO13.4 Broadband via satellite13.5 Mobile data services13.5.1 SMS13.5.2 MMS13.5.3 WAP13.5.4 GPRS and EDGE13.5.5 Mobile TV13.6 3G mobile broadband13.7 Mobile content and applications13.7.1 Mobile banking13.8 Forecasts – mobile subscribers 2013; 201614. Eritrea14.1 Market Overview14.1.1 Mobile statistics15. Ethiopia15.1 Market Overview15.1.1 Mobile statistics15.2 Mobile data services15.3 Third generation (3G)15.4 Mobile banking15.5 Satellite mobile15.6 Local handset manufacturing15.7 Smartphones15.8 Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2014; 201716. Gabon16.1 Market Overview16.1.1 Mobile statistics16.2 WiMAX16.3 3G17. Gambia17.1 Market Overview17.1.1 Mobile statistics17.2 Mobile data services17.2.1 SMS17.2.2 MMS17.2.3 GPRS/EDGE17.3 Third generation (3G)17.4 Mobile content and applications17.4.1 Mobile banking17.5 Satellite mobile18. Ghana18.1 Market Overview18.1.1 Mobile statistics18.2 Regulatory issues18.2.1 Licensing18.2.2 Tariffs18.2.3 Interconnect18.2.4 Taxation18.2.5 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)18.2.6 Infrastructure sharing18.2.7 Registration of subscriber details18.3 Mobile data services18.3.1 SMS18.3.2 GPRS, EDGE, WAP18.3.3 BlackBerry18.3.4 Mobile TV18.4 Third generation (3G)18.4.1 Mobile broadband18.5 Mobile content and applications18.5.1 Mobile money transfer18.6 Local handset manufacturing18.7 Satellite mobile18.8 Forecast – mobile market 2014; 201719. Guinea19.1 Market Overview19.1.1 Mobile statistics19.2 Mobile Broadband Overview19.2.1 SchoolWeb WiFi Network 19.2.2 VoIP Internet telephony19.3 Mobile data services19.4 Satellite mobile20. Kenya20.1 Market Overview20.1.1 Mobile statistics20.2 Regulatory issues20.2.1 Interconnection20.2.2 International gateways20.2.3 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)20.2.4 Quality of Service (QoS) control20.2.5 Registration of subscriber details20.2.6 Taxes20.2.7 Tariff regulation20.3 Wireless broadband20.3.1 WiFi20.3.2 WiMAX20.3.3 Mobile data services20.4 Broadband via satellite20.5 Mobile data services20.5.1 SMS20.5.2 MMS20.5.3 GPRS and EDGE20.5.4 BlackBerry20.6 3G20.7 LTE (4G)20.8 Mobile money transfer, m-banking20.8.1 M-Pesa (Safaricom)20.8.2 ZAP (Zain)20.8.3 yuCash (Essar)20.8.4 Orange Money20.8.5 Other services20.9 Mobile TV20.10 Satellite mobile20.11 Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 201621. Lesotho21.1 Market Overview21.1.1 Mobile statistics21.2 WiMAX21.3 EV-DO21.4 Mobile data services21.5 Third generation (3G) mobile21.6 Satellite mobile22. Liberia22.1 Market Overview22.1.1 Mobile statistics22.2 Regulatory issues22.2.1 Licence reform22.2.2 The Comium-Liberia Act22.2.3 GSM spectrum reallocation22.2.4 Interconnection22.3 Mobile Broadband overview22.4 EV-DO22.5 WiMAX22.6 Mobile data services22.7 Mobile content and applications22.7.1 Agricultural Market Information and Linkage System (AMILS)23. Libya23.1 Market Overview23.1.1 Mobile statistics23.2 Mobile data services23.2.1 SMS23.2.2 MMS23.2.3 GPRS/EDGE23.3 WiMAX23.4 WiFi23.5 Satellite broadband23.6 3G/HSDPA23.7 Mobile TV23.8 Satellite mobile24. Madagascar24.1 Market Overview24.1.1 Mobile statistics24.2 WiMAX24.3 EV-DO24.4 Broadband via satellite24.5 Mobile data services24.6 Third generation (3G)24.7 Mobile money transfer, m-banking24.8 Satellite mobile24.9 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 201625. Malawi25.1 Market Overview25.1.1 Mobile statistics25.2 Wireless broadband25.2.1 Broadmax25.2.2 Skyband25.2.3 Globmax25.2.4 eWiMAX25.3 Mobile data services25.4 Third generation (3G)25.5 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 201626. Mali26.1 Market Overview26.1.1 Mobile statistics26.2 Third mobile licence26.3 WiMAX26.4 Third generation (3G)26.5 Mobile content and applications26.5.1 M-payments and m-banking27. Mauritius27.1 Market Overview27.1.1 Mobile statistics27.2 WiFi27.3 WiMAX27.3.1 Nomad27.3.2 Other projects27.4 EV-DO27.5 Mobile data services27.6 Third generation (3G)27.7 Mobile broadband pricing27.8 Mobile content and applications27.8.1 Mobile TV27.8.2 Mobile banking27.9 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 201628. Morocco28.1 Market Overview28.2 Mobile statistics28.3 3G mobile broadband28.3.1 Inwi (formerly Wana, Maroc Connect)28.3.2 Meditel28.3.3 Maroc Telecom28.4 Broadband via satellite28.5 Mobile data services28.5.1 SMS28.5.2 MMS28.5.3 GPRS28.5.4 Blackberry28.5.5 Mobile TV28.6 Third-generation (3G) mobile28.6.1 Licensing28.6.2 Services28.7 Mobile payments, m-banking28.8 Satellite mobile29. Mozambique29.1 Market Overview29.2 Mobile statistics29.3 Wireless broadband29.3.1 EV-DO29.3.2 WiMAX29.4 Mobile data services29.5 Third generation (3G)29.6 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 201630. Namibia30.1 Market Overview30.1.1 The long road to Namibia‘s second mobile licence30.1.2 Mobile statistics30.2 Wireless broadband30.3 WiMAX30.4 WiFi30.5 Mobile data services30.5.1 SMS and MMS30.5.2 GPRS/EDGE30.5.3 3G/HSDPA30.5.4 LTE30.5.5 EV-DO30.6 Mobile content and applications30.6.1 Mobile TV30.6.2 Mobile banking30.7 Satellite mobile31. Nigeria31.1 Market Overview31.1.1 Mobile statistics31.2 Regulatory issues31.2.1 GSM licence terms31.2.2 Interconnection31.2.3 Mobile tariffs31.2.4 International gateways31.2.5 Unified licensing regime brings new competition31.2.6 Universal service31.2.7 Mobile number portability31.2.8 Central equipment identity register31.2.9 Poor quality of service31.2.10 Registration of subscriber details31.2.11 Foreign ownership31.3 Wireless broadband31.3.1 Odu’a Telecom31.3.2 Swift Networks31.3.3 Startech Connection31.3.4 Cyberspace Network31.3.5 Nitel31.3.6 Netcom Africa31.3.7 MWEB Nigeria31.3.8 Gateway Communications31.4 WiFi31.4.1 Accelon, Internet Solutions31.4.2 Jigawa Broadband Access Network31.4.3 Polestar/5G WiFi network in Lagos31.4.4 NaijaWiFi31.4.5 Abuja WiFi, WiMAX31.4.6 Enugu31.5 WiMAX31.6 Mobile broadband31.7 Mobile data services31.7.1 SMS31.7.2 MMS31.7.3 GPRS, EDGE31.7.4 WAP31.7.5 CDMA2000 1×31.7.6 BlackBerry31.7.7 Mobile money transfer, m-banking31.8 Mobile TV31.9 3G31.9.1 Licensing31.9.2 Globacom31.9.3 Zain31.9.4 MTN31.9.5 CDMA EV-DO31.10 LTE31.11 Satellite mobile31.12 Forecasts – mobile subscribers – 2013; 201632. Rwanda32.1 Market Overview32.1.1 Mobile statistics32.2 EV-DO32.3 WiMAX, WiBro32.4 WiFi32.5 Mobile data services32.6 Third generation (3G)32.7 Mobile money transfer, m-banking32.8 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013, 201633. Senegal33.1 Market Overview33.1.1 Mobile statistics33.2 Regulatory issues33.2.1 Mobile number portability (MNP)33.2.2 Registration of customer details33.2.3 Per-second billing (PSB)33.2.4 MVNO licences33.2.5 Millicom licence dispute33.3 WiFi33.4 Mobile data services33.4.1 SMS33.4.2 MMS33.4.3 GPRS and EDGE33.4.4 EV-DO33.4.5 WAP33.4.6 BlackBerry, iPhone33.4.7 Third Generation (3G)33.5 Mobile content and applications33.5.1 Manobi33.5.2 M-payments and m-banking34. Sierra Leone34.1 Market Overview34.1.1 Mobile licensing34.1.2 Mobile statistics34.2 Mobile data services34.3 Mobile content and applications34.3.1 M-payments34.4 Satellite mobile35. Somalia35.1 Market Overview35.1.1 Mobile market36. South Africa36.1 Market Overview36.2 Mobile statistics36.3 Market liberalisation and licence obligations36.4 Community service telephones (CST)36.5 Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC)36.6 Regulatory issues36.6.1 Prices36.6.2 Interconnection36.6.3 Handset subsidies36.6.4 International gateways36.6.5 Fees and obligations for 1800MHz spectrum36.6.6 Registration of subscriber ID36.6.7 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)36.6.8 Quality of service (QoS)36.7 Wireless broadband36.7.1 WiFi36.7.2 WiMAX36.7.3 EV-DO36.7.4 Wireless Access Providers Association (WAPA)36.7.5 MyWireless (Sentech) – decommissioned36.7.6 iBurst (WBS, Blue Label)36.8 3G mobile broadband36.9 Broadband via satellite36.10 Mobile data services36.10.1 Overview36.10.2 Mobile data revenue36.10.3 SMS36.10.4 MMS36.10.5 WAP36.10.6 GPRS36.10.7 EDGE36.10.8 BlackBerry36.11 3G and 3.5G (HSPA)36.11.1 Mobile broadband overview36.11.2 Vodacom36.11.3 MTN36.11.4 Cell C36.11.5 Telkom SA36.12 LTE (4G)36.13 Mobile content and applications36.13.1 Push-to-Talk (PTT)36.13.2 Mobile TV36.13.3 Mobile music36.13.4 CellBook36.13.5 M-commerce36.13.6 Mobile advertising36.13.7 Location-based services (LBS)36.13.8 Manobi36.13.9 Mobile social media36.14 Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013, 201637. Sudan37.1 Market Overview37.2 Mobile statistics37.3 EV-DO37.4 WiMAX37.5 Broadband via satellite37.6 Mobile data services37.6.1 SMS and MMS37.6.2 GPRS and EDGE37.7 Third generation (3G)37.8 Mobile content and applications37.8.1 Mobile money transfer37.9 Satellite mobile38. Swaziland38.1 Market Overview38.1.1 Mobile statistics38.2 Third generation (3G)39. Tanzania39.1 Market Overview39.1.1 Mobile statistics39.2 Wireless broadband39.2.1 iBurst39.2.2 EV-DO39.2.3 WiMAX39.3 Mobile data services and pricing39.3.1 Third generation (3G)39.3.2 Blackberry39.3.3 Mobile money transfer, m-banking39.4 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013, 201640. Tunisia40.1 Market Overview40.1.1 Mobile statistics40.2 WiMAX40.3 DSL by satellite40.4 Mobile data services40.4.1 SMS40.4.2 MMS40.4.3 GPRS, EDGE, WAP40.5 Third Generation (3G)40.6 Mobile TV40.7 Satellite mobile41. Uganda41.1 Market Overview41.2 Mobile statistics41.3 WiFi41.4 WiMAX41.5 Mobile data services41.5.1 SMS41.5.2 WAP, GPRS and EDGE41.5.3 MMS41.5.4 BlackBerry41.5.5 Third generation (3G)41.5.6 Mobile TV41.6 Mobile money transfer, m-banking41.6.1 Traditional bank charges and international remittances41.6.2 Regulation41.6.3 MTN Mobile Money41.6.4 ZAP (Zain)41.6.5 M-Sente (UTL)41.6.6 Other services41.7 Forecasts – mobile market 2013; 201642. Zambia42.1 Market Overview42.1.1 Mobile statistics42.2 WiMAX42.3 WiFi42.4 Mobile data services42.5 Third generation (3G)42.6 Mobile content and applications42.6.1 M-payment and m-banking42.7 Local handset manufacturing42.8 Satellite mobile42.9 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 201643. Zimbabwe43.1 Market Overview43.1.1 Mobile statistics43.1.2 WiMAX43.1.3 WiFi43.2 Mobile data services43.3 Third generation (3G)43.4 Satellite mobile44. Glossary of AbbreviationsTable 1 – Active mobile broadband penetration in selected African countries – 2009 – 2011Table 2 – Algeria Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 3 – Algeria Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 4 – Angola Unitel 3G broadband pricing – 2011Table 5 – Angola Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 6 – Benin Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 7 – Botswana Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 8 – Botswana Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change – September 2010Table 9 – Burkina Faso Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 10 – Burundi Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 11 – Cameroon Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1998 – 2012Table 12 – Cameroon Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change – June 2011Table 13 – Cameroon Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 14 – Chad Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 15 – Cote D’Ivoire Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 16 – DRC Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 17 – Djibouti Mobile subscribers and penetration – 2000 – 2012Table 18 – Egypt Mobile subscribers and penetration – 2000 – 2012Table 19 – Egypt Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 20 –Eritrea Mobile subscribers and penetration – 2004 – 2012Table 21 – Ethiopia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 22 – Ethiopia Broadband pricing comparison – HSDPA, GPRS, EV-DO, ADSL – August 2012Table 23 – Ethiopia Forecast mobile subscribers – 2014; 2017Table 24 – Gabon Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 25 – Gambia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 26 – Ghana Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 27 – Ghana Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change – May 2012Table 28 – Ghana Forecast mobile subscribers – 2014; 2017Table 29 – Guinea Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 30 – Kenya Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 31 – Kenya Mobile subscribers by operator and quarterly change – December 2011Table 32 – Kenya Safaricom voice/data revenue composition and annual growth – 2011Table 33 – Kenya Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 34 – Lesotho Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1997 – 2012Table 35 – Liberia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2001 – 2012Table 36 – Libya Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1998 – 2012Table 37 – Libyana 3G/HSDPA broadband pricing – 2010 – 2012Table 38 – Madagascar Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 39 – Madagascar Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 40 – Malawi Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 41 – Malawi Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 42 – Mali Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 43 – Mali Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change – June 2011Table 44 – Mauritius Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1995 – 2012Table 45 – Mauritius Orange mobile data/3G broadband post-paid pricing – 2008/09, 2011, 2012Table 46 – Mauritius Emtel mobile data/3G broadband pricing – 2011Table 47 – Mauritius MTML EV-DO mobile broadband pricing – 2012Table 48 – Mauritius Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 49 – Morocco Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 50 – Morocco Mobile subscribers by operator, technology and annual change – September 2011Table 51 – Morocco 3G mobile broadband subscribers by operator and market share – September 2011Table 52 – Morocco Meditel 3G+ broadband pricing – 2009 vs 2010Table 53 – Morocco Maroc Telecom 3G broadband pricing – 2009 vs 2010Table 54 – Morocco Maroc Telecom GPRS pricing – July 2010Table 55 – Mozambique Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1997 – 2012Table 56 – Mozambique TDM EV-DO broadband pricing – 2012 vs. 2010Table 57 – Mozambique mCel 3G prepaid pricing – 2010-2012Table 58 – Mozambique Vodacom 3G post-paid pricing – 2010-2012Table 59 – Mozambique Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 60 – Namibia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1995 – 2012Table 61 – Namibia Netman 3G mobile broadband pricing – May 2012Table 62 – Namibia Netman 4G mobile broadband pricing – May 2012Table 63 – Nigeria Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1998 – 2012Table 64 – Nigeria Mobile subscribers by operator, technology – December 2011Table 65 – Nigeria Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 66 – Rwanda Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 67 – Rwanda Mobile subscribers by operator – November 2011Table 68 – Rwanda Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 69 – Senegal Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 70 – Senegal Mobile subscribers by operator, technology, annual change – June 2011Table 71 – Senegal Orange GPRS/EDGE pricing – 2009; 2010Table 72 – Senegal Expresso EV-DO mobile broadband pricing – 2009; 2010Table 73 – Sierra Leone GSM licences and operations in Sierra Leone – 1998 – 2011Table 74 – Sierra Leone Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 75 – Sierra Leone Zain mobile Internet pricing by data download – January 2010Table 76 – Somalia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2000 – 2012Table 77 – South Africa Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1994 – 2012Table 78 – South Africa Telkom SA WiMAX subscribers – 2008 – 2011Table 79 – South Africa WAPA industry survey – 2006 – 2008Table 80 – South Africa Sentech MyWireless subscribers – 2005 – 2008Table 81 – South Africa iBurst subscribers – 2005 – 2011Table 82 – South Africa Vodacom broadband subscribers – 2006 – 2011Table 83 – South Africa Telkom SA mobile subscribers – 2009 – 2011Table 84 – South Africa Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 85 – Sudan Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1996 – 2012Table 86 – Sudani mDSL pricing – 2012 vs. 2010Table 87 – Sudani 3G mobile broadband pricing – July 2012Table 88 – Swaziland Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 89 – Tanzania Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Table 90 – Tanzania Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change – September 2011Table 91 – Tanzania Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 92 – Tunisia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1995 – 2012Table 93 – Uganda Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1996 – 2012Table 94 – Uganda Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 95 – Zambia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1995 – 2012Table 96 – Zambia Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016Table 97 – Zimbabwe Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012Chart 1 – Algeria Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 2 – Benin Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 3 – Botswana Mobile subscribers in Botswana – 2002 – 2012Chart 4 – Burkina Faso Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 5 – Burundi Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 6 – Cameroon Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 7 – Chad Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 8 – Cote D’Ivoire Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 9 – DRC Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 10 – Djibouti Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 11 – Egypt Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 12 – Eritrea Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2004 – 2012Chart 13 – Ethiopia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 14 – Gabon Mobile subscribers in Gabon – 2002 – 2012Chart 15 – Gambia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 16 – Ghana Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999-2012Chart 17 – Guinea Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 18 – Kenya Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999-2012Chart 19 – Lesotho Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 20 – Liberia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 21 – Libya Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 22 – Madagascar Mobile subscribers in Madagascar – 2002 – 2012Chart 23 – Malawi Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 24 – Mali Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 25 – Mauritius Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 26 – Morocco Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 27 – Mozambique Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 28 – Namibia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 29 – Nigeria Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 30 – Rwanda Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 31 – Senegal Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 32 – Sierra Leone Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 33 – Somalia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 34 – South Africa Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 35 – Sudan Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 36 – Swaziland Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 37 – Tanzania Mobile subscribers in Tanzania – 2002 – 2012Chart 38 – Tunisia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 39 – Uganda Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 40 – Zambia Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Chart 41 – – Zimbabwe Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012Exhibit 1 – An analysis of Egypt‘s third mobile licence valuationExhibit 2 – SMS as a weapon against drug counterfeitingExhibit 3 – Texting elephantsExhibit 4 – Job offers by SMS

To order this report:Broadband Industry: Africa – Mobile Broadband, Data and Mobile Media Market

Contact
Nicolas Bombourg
Reportlinker
Email: nicolasbombourg@reportlinker.com
US: (805)652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626

 

SOURCE Reportlinker

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Novus Announces Support of Modern Poultry Complex in Chad

Posted on 15 August 2012 by Africa Business

Complex will serve as a model for other countries

ST. LOUIS, Aug. 15, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Novus International, Inc. recently announced its support of a modern poultry production complex in Chad. The signing ceremony for the project, termed “Project Koundoul,” took place on Thursday July 19, 2012, in N’Djamena. Participants in the ceremony included the country’s Prime Minister, Emmanuel Nadingar, along with representatives from Globoaves, a Brazilian-based poultry breeder and production company, and Novus.

“We are excited to support a project where Novus, our partner Globoaves and the Chad government are working together to establish a modern poultry production complex in their country,” stated Luis Azevedo, Executive Director, Latin America, at Novus. “This example of South-South partnership is important for capacity building, helping to improve food security and the livelihood of the Chadians. This project may serve as a model for the development of industrial meat production in Africa.”

The project dates to October 2010, when Novus President and CEO, Thad Simons, met with the Prime Minister of Chad during an agribusiness conference in Uganda. The Chad government attended a presentation of the Program of Family Poultry (PAF – Programa de Avicultura Familiar – www.paf.org.br) in Alagoas, a joint project by Globoaves and Novus. The prime minister expressed interest in having Globoaves and Novus as partners with their government on a food security national program. Novus and Mr. Simons collaborated with Novus Africa to work with Globoaves in support of the program.

In addition to Thad Simons, two other Novus employees were instrumental in the development of the agreement; Luis Azevedo, who managed the Brazilian involvement with Globoaves and Bayella Thiam, Executive Manager, Novus Africa, who was involved on the ground and dealt directly with the Chad government.

“Besides bringing poultry production to an industrial level in Africa, the idea is to build a complete poultry ecosystem from industrial to small scale, and from genetics to farm and to fork,” commented Bayella Thiam. “We expect to bring this model to sub-Saharan countries that are looking to develop agribusiness, especially chicken and egg business.”

Project Koundoul will be completed over a 24-month process, beginning 4th quarter 2012 through the end of 2014.

“The signing of the agreement for Project Koundoul represents the culmination of a lot of hard work by representatives of the Chad government, Globoaves and the Novus team,” said Dan Meagher, President, Global Animal Nutrition Solutions, at Novus. “Novus is honored to support a project that will benefit all Chadians. We look forward to its success and to replicate this model in other countries as a means to feed the world affordable, wholesome food and achieve a higher quality of life.”

For more information visit www.novusint.com

About Novus International, Inc.

Novus International, Inc. is headquartered in metropolitan St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. and serves customers in nearly 100 countries around the world. A global leader in developing animal health and nutrition solutions, Novus’s products include ALIMET® and MHA® feed supplements, ACTIVATE® nutritional feed acid, ACIDOMIX® preservative premixture, ADVENT® coccidiosis control, MINTREX® chelated trace minerals, SANTOQUIN® feed preservative, MERA™MET aquaculture feed additive, AGRADO® feed ingredient and many other specialty ingredients. Arenus® (www.arenus.com) is a division of Novus Nutrition Brands, LLC (a subsidiary of Novus International, Inc.) that focuses on developing health and dietary supplements for the equine and companion animal markets. Stratum® Nutrition, a division of Novus Nutrition Brands, LLC, focuses on human nutrition through specialty and functional ingredients for manufacturers of foods, beverages and dietary supplements (www.stratumnutrition.com). Novus is privately owned by Mitsui & Co. (U.S.A.), Inc. and Nippon Soda Co., Ltd. For more information visit www.novusint.com

®NOVUS, ALIMET, MHA, ACTIVATE, ACIDOMIX, CIBENZA, MAAC, MINTREX, SANTOQUIN and AGRADO are trademarks of Novus International, Inc. and are registered in the United States and other countries. ®ADVENT is a trademark of Viridus Animal Health, LLC, and is registered in the United States and other countries. ®ARENUS is a registered trademark of Novus Nutrition Brands, LLC. ®STRATUM NUTRITION is a trademark of Novus Nutrition Brands, LLC, and is registered in the United States and other countries. ™MERA and SOLUTIONS SERVICE SUSTAINABILITY are trademarks of Novus International, Inc. © 2012 Novus International, Inc. All rights reserved.

Contacts: Tracy Barfield
636.794.2411
Tracy.barfield@novusint.com

Larry Stoller
314.576.8459
Larry.stoller@novusint.com

SOURCE Novus International, Inc.

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NGO Intelligence Led to Ivory Bust in China

Posted on 12 August 2012 by Africa Business

YARMOUTH PORT, Mass., Aug. 10, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Based on information provided by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW – www.ifaw.org), China‘s Forestry Police conducted a surprise inspection on at Chengtian Antique Mall on where they confiscated 107 pieces of illegal ivory and other wildlife products.  Three suspects were detained in connection with the August 6th seizure.

Located near Beijing, the wholesale mall is highlighted in the recent IFAW report, “Making a Killing—A 2011 Survey of Ivory Markets in China,” as one of the worst locations for illegal ivory trade.  Out of 22 shops that are involved in ivory trade, only one has the necessary license.

“It is very gratifying to see that the intelligence provided by IFAW resulted in the confiscation of ivory and the arrest of criminal suspects,” said Grace Gabriel, IFAW’s Asia Regional Director.  “Successful law enforcement operations like this serve as reminders to wildlife traffickers and traders that their crimes against nature will not be tolerated.”

Under China‘s regulatory system that was introduced in 2004, only government-approved ivory processing and retail outlets are allowed to trade in elephant ivory.

Of the 158 retail shops and carving factories investigated by IFAW in 2011, 101 of them did not have ivory trade licenses and were operating illegally.

The IFAW report charts how the 2008 Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) sanctioned sale of stockpiled ivory has fueled the market demand for ivory, and how the legal ivory market in China has provided cover for illegal trade of ivory from poached elephants.

Prior to publicly releasing the report, IFAW sent details of the investigation to China‘s wildlife enforcement authorities, including intelligence on the location of the illegal ivory operations and contact details for illegal traders.

“Intelligence-led enforcement, combined with severe penalties, is absolutely necessary to deter illegal ivory trade,” added Gabriel.  “This sinful trade is at the core of the elephant poaching crisis in Africa right now. Poachers gun down entire families of elephants just for their ivory tusks to supply the cruel and illegal market.”

Just a week ago, more than 40 elephants were slaughtered in Chad.  The poachers responsible were local Chadians, but Chinese nationals working in Chad were implicated in the smuggling of the ivory.

Worldwide seizures of elephant ivory amounted to 23 tons in 2011, representing the lives of thousands of elephants.

About IFAW (the International Fund for Animal Welfare)
Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

SOURCE International Fund for Animal Welfare

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Africa – Mobile Voice Market and Major Network Operators

Posted on 10 July 2012 by AfricaBusiness.com

 

NEW YORK, July 10, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

 

Africa – Mobile Voice Market and Major Network Operators

http://www.reportlinker.com/p0184366/Africa—Mobile-Voice-Market-and-Major-Network-Operators.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Wireless_Technology

 

Market penetration to reach 60% among Africa‘s one billion people in 2012 Mobile phones represent more than 90% of all telephone lines in Africa. Market penetration passed the 50% mark in 2010 and is expected to reach 60% in 2012. Subscriber growth across the continent has slowed to around 17% p.a, but several individual markets are still growing at 50% p.a. or more and others stand at only single-digit penetration rates. The continent’s most advanced markets have passed the 100% penetration mark.

 

Although the greatest demand is in the major cities, cellular solutions are also being employed to increase accessibility in rural and other disadvantaged areas. In addition to mobile networks, Wireless Local Loop (WLL) systems have been introduced in a large number of countries for the provision of fixed-wireless services, with CDMA-2000 1x having evolved as a preferred technology. Additional choices are available through satellite-based mobile services such as Globalstar, ICO, Iridium and Thuraya.

 

The introduction of prepaid services and a steady decline in tariffs has meant that more than half of Africa‘s one billion people can now afford a mobile phone. However, as lower income groups are being targeted, the declining Average Revenue per User (ARPU) is putting pressure on the network operators profit margins. Literal price wars have broken out in some markets where a large number of operators have been licensed. Despite this, international investors are still very keen to enter the market through new mobile licences or shares in existing mobile operations in Africa.

 

With their superior national coverage and large subscriber bases, Africa‘s mobile network operators have built up a level of market power to the extent that they have been called the new incumbents. Newly introduced converged licensing regimes have increased the competitive pressure but also allow the mobile operators to branch out into new service segments.

 

A variety of companies have established themselves as regional major players in Africa‘s mobile sector. France Telecom, through its Orange mobile division has established a presence in 18 African countries, South Africa‘s MTN in 16, in addition to several in the Middle East. India‘s Bharti Airtel took over 15 of the 16 African operations of Kuwait‘s Zain for US$10.7 billion and is now operating in a total of 17 African countries.

MTN’s archrival in its South African home market, Vodacom’s expansion across the continent has been limited to a total of only five countries due to restrictions from the partnership agreement with its majority shareholder, Vodafone which itself operates in three countries.

 

Millicom from Luxembourg was also among the early investors and is now operating under the Tigo brand in seven African countries.

 

Orascom from Egypt divested most of its sub-Saharan operations between 2002 and 2005, mostly in markets with low penetration and high growth potential, to concentrate on the more developed North African and Middle Eastern markets. However, in 2008 it established a new subsidiary Telecel Globe to re-enter sub-Saharan Africa, including some of the same markets it had abandoned five years earlier.

Other regional players with major funding from the Middle East include the UAE’s Etisalat under the Moov brand, Warid Telecom, and the Lebanon-based Comium Group. Other African companies that have expanded beyond their home markets include Zimbabwe‘s Econet, Maroc Telecom (with backing from Vivendi of France), Libya‘s LapGreen and Sudan‘s Sudatel under the Expresso brand.

 

Further consolidation is expected as smaller players are finding it increasingly difficult to compete. But even the bigger pan-African operators have become potential takeover targets for even bigger global players.

 

 

Market highlights:

 

Mobile market penetration in Africa to reach 60% in 2012;

Unsustainable price wars are raging in some countries;

Mobile ARPU has bottomed in some markets but is still falling rapidly in others;

Some mobile operators are rolling out national fibre optic backbone networks and are entering new service sectors under converged licensing regimes;

Subscriber statistics and estimates for 2012 for each country;

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) are expected to intensify in an increasingly crowded market.

 

Top 10 African countries by annual growth – mid-2011

 

Country | Annual growth |

Ethiopia | 116% |

Mali | 62% |

Djibouti | 60% |

Burundi | 58% |

Comoros Islands | 58% |

Mayotte | 51% |

Burkina Faso | 49% |

Somalia | 48% |

Equatorial Guinea | 45% |

Zimbabwe | 43% |

(Source: BuddeComm based on various sources)

 

 

 

1. Algeria

1.1 Overview of Algeria‘s mobile market

1.1.1 Mobile statistics

1.2 Regulatory issues

1.2.1 Registration of subscriber details

1.3 Major mobile operators

1.3.1 Algerie Telecom (Mobilis)

1.3.2 Orascom Telecom Algerie (Djezzy)

1.3.3 Wataniya Telecom (Nedjma)

1.4 Mobile handsets

1.5 Tariffs

1.6 ARPU

1.7 Third generation (3G)

1.8 GSM-R

1.9 Satellite mobile

1.10 Forecasts

1.10.1 Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016

2. Angola

2.1 Overview of Angola‘s mobile market

2.1.1 Mobile statistics

2.2 Major mobile operators

2.2.1 Movicel (Angola Telecom)

2.2.2 Unitel

2.3 Third generation (3G) mobile data services

2.4 Satellite mobile

2.5 Forecasts

2.5.1 Forecast mobile market – 2013; 2016

3. Benin

3.1 Overview of Benin‘s mobile market

3.1.1 Mobile statistics

3.2 Major mobile operators

3.2.1 MTN (Spacetel-Benin, Areeba)

3.2.2 Moov (Telecel Benin)

3.2.3 Libercom (Benin Telecoms)

3.2.4 BBCom (Bell Benin)

3.2.5 Glo Mobile Benin (Globacom)

3.3 Government confrontation with MTN and Moov

3.4 Satellite mobile

4. Botswana

4.1 Overview of Botswana‘s mobile market

4.1.1 Mobile statistics

4.2 Regulatory issues

4.2.1 Backbone infrastructure

4.2.2 Airtime tax

4.2.3 Registration of subscriber details

4.3 Major mobile operators

4.3.1 Mascom Wireless

4.3.2 Orange Botswana (formerly Vista Cellular)

4.3.3 BeMobile (BTC)

4.4 Third generation (3G)

5. Burkina Faso

5.1 Overview of Burkina Faso‘s mobile market

5.1.1 Mobile statistics

5.2 Major mobile operators

5.2.1 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel)

5.2.2 Telmob (Onatel)

5.2.3 Moov (Telecel, Etisalat)

5.3 Third generation (3G)

6. Burundi

6.1 Overview of Burundi‘s mobile market

6.2 Mobile statistics

7. Cameroon

7.1 Overview of Cameroon‘s mobile market

7.1.1 Mobile statistics

7.2 Major mobile operators

7.2.1 MTN Cameroon

7.2.2 Orange CM

7.3 Third mobile licence

7.4 Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNO)

7.5 Satellite mobile

7.6 Forecasts

7.6.1 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 2016

8. Chad

8.1 Overview of Chad‘s mobile market

8.1.1 Mobile statistics

8.2 Major mobile operators

8.2.1 Airtel Chad (formerly Zain)

8.2.2 Millicom Chad (Tigo)

8.2.3 Tchad Mobile (defunct)

8.3 Satellite mobile

9. Cote d’Ivoire

9.1 Overview of Côte d’Ivoire’s mobile market

9.1.1 Mobile statistics

9.2 Major mobile operators

9.2.1 MTN Côte d’Ivoire (formerly Loteny)

9.2.2 Orange CI

9.2.3 Comium (KoZ)

9.2.4 Moov (Etisalat)

9.2.5 Green Network (Oricel, LapGreen)

9.2.6 Warid Telecom

9.2.7 Globacom

9.2.8 CORA de Comstar and Aircomm CI (Historic)

9.3 Satellite mobile

10. Democratic Republic of Congo

10.1 Overview of the DRC’s mobile market

10.1.1 Mobile statistics

10.2 Regulatory issues

10.2.1 GSM licence conditions, fees and taxes

10.3 Major mobile operators

10.3.1 Vodacom Congo

10.3.2 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel)

10.3.3 Tigo (Millicom)

10.3.4 CCT

11. Djibouti

11.1 Overview of the, mobile Market in Djibouti

11.2 Mobile statistics

12. Egypt

12.1 Overview of Egypt‘s mobile market

12.1.1 Telecom Egypt’s mobile deal

12.1.2 Third mobile licence

12.1.3 Fourth mobile licence

12.1.4 Mobile statistics

12.2 Regulatory issues

12.2.1 Tariffs

12.2.2 International gateways

12.2.3 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)

12.2.4 Registration of user details

12.2.5 GPS ban

12.3 Major mobile operators

12.3.1 Mobinil (ECMS)

12.3.2 Vodafone Egypt

12.3.3 Etisalat Misr

12.4 Mobile voice services

12.4.1 Prepaid services

12.4.2 Satellite mobile

12.4.3 Mobile VoIP

12.5 3G mobile broadband

12.6 Forecasts – mobile subscribers 2013; 2016

13. Eritrea

13.1 Overview of mobile Market in Eritrea

13.2 Mobile statistics

14. Ethiopia

14.1 Overview of Ethiopia‘s mobile market

14.1.1 Mobile statistics

14.2 Mobile operator

14.2.1 Ethio-Mobile

14.3 Third generation (3G)

14.4 Satellite mobile

14.5 Forecasts

14.5.1 Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016

15. Gabon

15.1 Overview of Gabon‘s mobile market

15.1.1 Mobile statistics

15.2 Major mobile operators

15.2.1 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel)

15.2.2 Libertis (Gabon Telecom)

15.2.3 Moov (Telecel Gabon)

15.2.4 Azur (USAN, Bintel)

15.3 3G

16. Gambia

16.1 Overview of Gambia‘s mobile market

16.1.1 Mobile statistics

16.2 Major mobile operators

16.2.1 Gamcel

16.2.2 Africell

16.2.3 Comium

16.2.4 QCell

16.2.5 Additional licences

16.3 Third generation (3G)

16.4 Satellite mobile

17. Ghana

17.1 Overview of Ghana‘s mobile market

17.1.1 Mobile statistics

17.2 Regulatory issues

17.2.1 Licensing

17.2.2 Tariffs

17.2.3 Interconnect

17.2.4 Taxation

17.2.5 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)

17.2.6 Infrastructure sharing

17.2.7 Registration of subscriber details

17.3 Major mobile operators

17.3.1 Vodafone (Ghana Telecom, OneTouch)

17.3.2 MTN Ghana (formerly ScanCom, Spacefon Areeba)

17.3.3 Millicom Ghana (Mobitel, Tigo)

17.3.4 Kasapa

17.3.5 Zain (Celtel, Westel)

17.3.6 Globacom

17.4 Average revenue per user (ARPU)

17.5 Third generation (3G)

17.6 Local handset manufacturing

17.7 Satellite mobile

17.8 Forecast – mobile market 2013; 2016

18. Guinea

18.1 Overview of Guinea‘s mobile market

18.1.1 Mobile statistics

18.2 Major mobile operators

18.2.1 MTN Guinea (Areeba)

18.2.2 Sotelgui (Lagui)

18.2.3 Orange Guinea (formerly Spacetel Guinee)

18.2.4 Intercel Guinea (formerly Télécel Guinea)

18.2.5 Cellcom Guinee

18.3 Satellite mobile

19. Kenya

19.1 Overview of Kenya‘s mobile market

19.1.1 Mobile statistics

19.2 Regulatory issues

19.2.1 Interconnection

19.2.2 International gateways

19.2.3 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)

19.2.4 Quality of Service (QoS) control

19.2.5 Registration of subscriber details

19.2.6 Taxes

19.2.7 Tariff regulation

19.3 Major mobile operators

19.3.1 Safaricom Ltd

19.3.2 Bharti Airtel Kenya (formerly Zain, Celtel, KenCell)

19.3.3 Essar Telecom Kenya (Yu, formerly Econet)

19.3.4 Orange Kenya (Telkom Kenya)

19.4 Mobile voice services

19.4.1 Prepaid cards

19.4.2 Special regional tariffs

19.4.3 International roaming

19.4.4 VoIP

19.4.5 Flashback

19.4.6 GSM community phones

19.4.7 Price war

19.4.8 Low-cost handsets

19.4.9 Satellite mobile

19.5 3G

19.6 LTE (4G)

19.7 Forecasts

19.7.1 Forecast mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016

20. Lesotho

20.1 Overview of Lesotho‘s mobile market

20.1.1 Mobile statistics

20.2 Major mobile operators

20.2.1 Vodacom Lesotho

20.2.2 Econet Ezi-Cel

20.3 Third generation (3G) mobile

20.4 Satellite mobile

21. Liberia

21.1 Overview of Liberia‘s mobile market

21.1.1 Mobile statistics

21.2 Regulatory issues

21.2.1 Licence reform

21.2.2 The Comium-Liberia Act

21.2.3 GSM spectrum reallocation

21.2.4 Interconnection

21.3 Major mobile operators

21.3.1 MTN Liberia (LoneStar)

21.3.2 Cellcom

21.3.3 Comium

21.3.4 LiberCell

21.4 Additional licences

22. Libya

22.1 Overview of Libya‘s mobile market

22.1.1 Mobile statistics

22.2 Major mobile operators

22.2.1 Al-Madar (El-Madar)

22.2.2 Libyana

22.3 3G/HSDPA

22.4 Satellite mobile

23. Madagascar

23.1 Overview of Madagascar‘s mobile market

23.1.1 Mobile statistics

23.2 Major mobile operators

23.2.1 Bharti Airtel (formerly Madacom, Zain/Celtel)

23.2.2 Orange Madagascar (formerly SMM)

23.2.3 Telma Mobile

23.2.4 Madamobil

23.3 Mobile handsets

23.4 Third generation (3G)

23.5 Satellite mobile

23.6 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 2016

24. Malawi

24.1 Overview of Malawi‘s mobile market

24.1.1 Mobile statistics

24.2 Major mobile operators

24.2.1 TNM

24.2.2 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel)

24.3 Third and fourth mobile licence

24.3.1 G-Mobile (GAIN)

24.4 Third generation (3G)

24.5 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 2016

25. Mali

25.1 Overview of Mali‘s mobile market

25.1.1 Mobile statistics

25.2 Third mobile licence

25.3 Major mobile operators

25.3.1 Malitel

25.3.2 Orange Mali (formerly Ikatel)

25.4 Third generation (3G)

26. Mauritius

26.1 Overview of the Mauritian mobile market

26.1.1 Mobile statistics

26.2 Major mobile operators

26.2.1 Orange (MT, Cellplus)

26.2.2 Emtel

26.2.3 Mahanagar (MTML)

26.3 Third generation (3G)

26.4 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 2016

27. Morocco

27.1 Overview of Morocco‘s mobile market

27.2 Mobile statistics

27.3 Major mobile operators

27.3.1 Maroc Telecom (IAM)

27.3.2 Medi Telecom (Meditel)

27.3.3 Inwi (formerly Wana)

27.4 Third-generation (3G) mobile

27.4.1 Licensing

27.4.2 Services

27.5 Satellite mobile

28. Mozambique

28.1 Overview of Mozambique‘s mobile market

28.2 Mobile statistics

28.3 Major mobile operators

28.3.1 mCel

28.3.2 Vodacom Mozambique

28.4 Third mobile licence

28.5 Third generation (3G)

28.6 ARPU

28.7 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 2016

29. Namibia

29.1 Overview of Namibia‘s mobile market

29.1.1 The long road to Namibia‘s second mobile licence

29.1.2 Mobile statistics

29.2 Major mobile operators

29.2.1 MTC

29.2.2 Cell One (Leo)

29.3 Satellite mobile

30. Nigeria

30.1 Overview of Nigeria‘s mobile market

30.1.1 Mobile statistics

30.2 Regulatory issues

30.2.1 GSM licence terms

30.2.2 Interconnection

30.2.3 Mobile tariffs

30.2.4 International gateways

30.2.5 Unified licensing regime brings new competition

30.2.6 Universal service

30.2.7 Mobile number portability

30.2.8 Central equipment identity register

30.2.9 Poor quality of service

30.2.10 Registration of subscriber details

30.2.11 Foreign ownership

30.3 Major mobile operators

30.3.1 MTN Nigeria

30.3.2 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain/Celtel Nigeria)

30.3.3 Globacom

30.3.4 M-Tel

30.3.5 Unified service licensees

30.4 3G

30.4.1 Licensing

30.4.2 Globacom

30.4.3 Zain

30.4.4 MTN

30.4.5 CDMA EV-DO

30.5 LTE

30.6 Satellite mobile

30.7 Forecasts – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016

31. Rwanda

31.1 Overview of Rwanda‘s mobile market

31.1.1 Mobile statistics

31.2 Major mobile operators

31.2.1 MTN Rwanda

31.2.2 Rwandatel (formerly Terracom Mobile)

31.2.3 Millicom Rwanda (Tigo)

31.3 Mobile handsets

31.4 Third generation (3G)

31.5 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013, 2016

32. Senegal

32.1 Overview of Senegal‘s mobile market

32.1.1 Mobile statistics

32.2 Regulatory issues

32.2.1 Mobile number portability (MNP)

32.2.2 Registration of customer details

32.2.3 Per-second billing (PSB)

32.2.4 MVNO licences

32.2.5 Millicom licence dispute

32.3 Major mobile operators

32.3.1 Orange (Sonatel Mobiles)

32.3.2 Tigo (Sentel GSM)

32.3.3 Expresso (Sudatel)

33. Sierra Leone

33.1 Overview of Sierra Leone‘s mobile market

33.1.1 Mobile licensing

33.1.2 Mobile statistics

33.2 Major mobile operators

33.2.1 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel)

33.2.2 Comium

33.2.3 Africell (Lintel)

33.2.4 Tigo (now part of Africell)

33.2.5 Sierratel

33.2.6 Datatel

33.2.7 Cellcom

33.2.8 Ambitel GreenN

33.3 Satellite mobile

34. South Africa

34.1 Overview of South Africa‘s mobile market

34.1.1 Mobile statistics

34.1.2 Market liberalisation and licence obligations

34.1.3 Community service telephones (CST)

34.1.4 Fixed-mobile convergence (FMC)

34.2 Regulatory issues

34.2.1 Prices

34.2.2 Interconnection

34.2.3 Handset subsidies

34.2.4 International gateways

34.2.5 Fees and obligations for 1800MHz spectrum

34.2.6 Registration of subscriber ID

34.2.7 Mobile Number Portability (MNP)

34.2.8 Quality of service (QoS)

34.2.9 Mobile handsets, smartphones

34.3 Major mobile operators

34.3.1 Vodacom South Africa

34.3.2 MTN South Africa

34.3.3 Cell C

34.3.4 Telkom SA

34.3.5 Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNO)

34.4 3G and 3.5G (HSPA)

34.4.1 Mobile broadband overview

34.4.2 Vodacom

34.4.3 MTN

34.4.4 Cell C

34.4.5 Telkom SA

34.5 LTE (4G)

34.6 Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013, 2016

35. Sudan

35.1 Overview of Sudan‘s mobile market

35.2 Mobile statistics

35.3 Major mobile operators

35.3.1 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain)

35.3.2 MTN Sudan (Bashair Telecom, Investcom/Areeba)

35.3.3 Sudani (Sudatel)

35.4 Third generation (3G)

35.5 Satellite mobile

35.6 Southern Sudan

35.6.1 Overview

35.6.2 The five national operators

35.6.3 Local operators

36. Swaziland

36.1 Overview of Swaziland‘s mobile market

36.1.1 Mobile statistics

36.2 Swazi MTN

36.2.1 Shareholders

36.2.2 Licence conditions

36.2.3 Network rollout and coverage

36.2.4 Services and tariffs

36.2.5 Distribution channels

36.2.6 ARPU analysis

36.3 Third generation (3G)

37. Tanzania

37.1 Overview of Tanzania‘s mobile market

37.1.1 Mobile statistics

37.2 Major mobile operators

37.2.1 Vodacom Tanzania

37.2.2 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain, Celtel)

37.2.3 Millicom Tanzania (Mobitel, Tigo)

37.2.4 Zantel

37.3 Tariffs

37.3.1 Special regional tariffs

37.3.2 Free international roaming

37.3.3 Price war 2010

37.4 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013, 2016

38. Tunisia

38.1 Overview of Tunisia‘s mobile market

38.1.1 Mobile statistics

38.2 Major mobile operators

38.2.1 Tunicell (Tunisie Telecom)

38.2.2 Tunisiana

38.2.3 Orange Tunisie

38.3 Third Generation (3G)

38.4 Satellite mobile

38.5 GSM-R

39. Uganda

39.1 Overview of Uganda‘s mobile market

39.1.1 Mobile statistics

39.2 Regulatory issues

39.2.1 Licensing

39.2.2 Taxes

39.2.3 infrastructure sharing

39.3 Major mobile operators

39.3.1 MTN Uganda

39.3.2 Bharti Airtel Uganda (formerly Zain, Celtel)

39.3.3 Uganda Telecom Ltd (UTL)

39.3.4 Warid Telecom

39.3.5 Orange Uganda (HiTS Telecom)

39.3.6 i-Tel

39.4 Tariffs and price war

39.4.1 Per-second billing

39.4.2 Free calls

39.4.3 Flat rates

39.4.4 MTN Zone

39.4.5 Free international roaming

39.4.6 Forecasts – mobile market 2013; 2016

40. Zambia

40.1 Overview of Zambia‘s mobile market

40.1.1 Mobile statistics

40.2 Major mobile operators

40.2.1 Bharti Airtel (formerly Zain/Celtel, Zamcell)

40.2.2 MTN Zambia (formerly Telecel)

40.2.3 Cell Z (Zamtel)

40.3 Average revenue per user (ARPU)

40.4 Third generation (3G)

40.5 Local handset manufacturing

40.6 Satellite mobile

40.7 Forecasts – mobile market – 2013; 2016

41. Zimbabwe

41.1 Overview of Zimbabwe‘s mobile market

41.1.1 Mobile statistics

41.2 Major mobile operators

41.2.1 Econet Wireless Zimbabwe (EWZ)

41.2.2 NetOne

41.2.3 Telecel Zimbabwe

41.3 Third generation (3G)

41.4 Satellite mobile

42. Glossary of Abbreviations

Table 1 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Algeria – 1999 – 2012

Table 2 – Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change in AlgeriaSeptember 2010

Table 3 – Djezzy blended ARPU in Algeria – 2002 – 2010

Table 4 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Algeria – 2013; 2016

Table 5 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Angola – 1999 – 2012

Table 6 – Unitel 3G broadband pricing in Angola – 2011

Table 7 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Angola – 2013; 2016

Table 8 – Mobile subscriber and penetration rate in Benin – 1999 – 2012

Table 9 – MTN Benin ARPU – 2003 – 2010

Table 10 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Botswana – 1999 – 2012

Table 11 – Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change in BotswanaSeptember 2010

Table 12 – Mascom ARPU in Botswana – 2005 – 2011

Table 13 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Burkina Faso – 1999 – 2012

Table 14 – Zain Burkina Faso subscribers and ARPU – 2006 – 2009

Table 15 – Zain Burkina Faso financial results and capital expenditure – 2006 – 2009

Table 16 – Telmob subscribers and ARPU in Burkina Faso – 2007 – 2011

Table 17 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Burundi – 1999 – 2012

Table 18 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Cameroon – 1998 – 2012

Table 19 – Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change in CameroonJune 2011

Table 20 – MTN Cameroon ARPU – 2003 – 2011

Table 21 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Cameroon – 2013; 2016

Table 11 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Chad – 2000 – 2012

Table 22 – Zain Chad subscribers – 2005 – 2010

Table 23 – Zain Chad ARPU – 2002 – 2009

Table 24 – Tigo Chad subscribers – 2008 – 2011

Table 25 – Tigo Chad quarterly ARPU – 2009 – 2010

Table 12 – Tchad Mobile (defunct) subscribers – 2001 – 2004

Table 26 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Cote d Ivoire – 2000 – 2012

Table 27 – MTN-CI subscribers in Cote d Ivoire – 2002 – 2011

Table 28 – MTN Côte d’Ivoire ARPU – 2005 – 2011

Table 29 – Orange CI subscribers in Cote d Ivoire – 2002 – 2011

Table 30 – Comium CI subscribers in Cote d Ivoire – 2007 – 2010

Table 31 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in DRC – 1999 – 2012

Table 32 – Vodacom Congo subscribers in DRC – 2002 – 2011

Table 33 – Vodacom Congo ARPU in DRC – 2003 – 2011

Table 34 – Zain DRC ARPU – 2002 – 2009

Table 35 – Mobile subscribers and penetration in Djibouti – 2000 – 2012

Table 36 – Mobile subscribers and penetration in Egypt – 2000 – 2012

Table 37 – Mobinil active subscribers in Egypt – 2000 – 2011

Table 38 – Mobinil financial results in Egypt – 2002 – 2011

Table 39 – Mobinil blended monthly ARPU in Egypt – 2002 – 2011

Table 40 – Vodafone Egypt subscribers – 2000 – 2011

Table 41 – Vodafone Egypt blended monthly ARPU – 2003 – 2011

Table 42 – Forecast – mobile subscribers in Egypt – 2013; 2016

Table 43 – Mobile subscribers and penetration in Eritrea – 2004 – 2012

Table 44 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Ethiopia – 1999 – 2012

Table 45 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Ethiopia – 2013; 2016

Table 46 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Gabon – 1999 – 2012

Table 47 – Zain Gabon subscribers and ARPU – 2002 – 2009

Table 48 – Libertis subscribers and ARPU in Gabon – 2007 – 2011

Table 49 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Gambia – 1999 – 2012

Table 50 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Ghana – 1999 – 2012

Table 51 – Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change in GhanaMay 2010

Table 52 – MTN Ghana ARPU – 2002 – 2010

Table 53 – MTN Ghana 3G mobile broadband pricing – August 2010

Table 54 – Vodafone Ghana 3G mobile broadband prepaid pricing – August 2010

Table 55 – Vodafone Ghana 3G mobile broadband postpaid pricing – August 2010

Table 56 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Ghana – 2013; 2016

Table 57 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 1999 – 2012

Table 58 – MTN Guinea subscribers and ARPU – 2006 – 2010

Table 59 – Orange Guinea subscribers – 2007 – 2011

Table 60 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Kenya – 1999 – 2012

Table 61 – Mobile subscribers by operator and quarterly change in KenyaSeptember 2011

Table 62 – Safaricom ARPU in Kenya – 2007 – 2011

Table 63 – Zain Kenya ARPU – 2006 – 2009

Table 64 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Kenya – 2013; 2016

Table 65 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Lesotho – 1997 – 2012

Table 66 – Vodacom Lesotho subscribers, ARPU and churn rate – 2002 – 2011

Table 67 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Liberia – 2001 – 2012

Table 68 – LoneStar/MTN Liberia subscribers, ARPU and market share – 2003 – 2011

Table 69 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Libya – 1998 – 2012

Table 70 – Mobile subscribers by operator, technology, and annual change in LibyaMarch 2010

Table 71 – Libyana 3G/HSDPA broadband pricing – July 2010

Table 72 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Madagascar – 2000 – 2012

Table 73 – Zain Madagascar financial data before takeover – 2006 – 2009

Table 74 – Orange Madagascar subscribers – 2007 – 2011

Table 75 – Forecast – mobile subscribers – 2013; 2016

Table 76 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Malawi – 1999 – 2012

Table 77 – TNM ARPU in Malawi – 2003 – 2009

Table 78 – Forecast – mobile subscribers in Malawi – 2013; 2016

Table 79 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Mali – 2000 – 2012

Table 80 – Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change in MaliJune 2011

Table 81 – Malitel subscribers and ARPU – 2008 – 2011

Table 82 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Mauritius – 1995 – 2012

Table 83 – Forecast – mobile subscribers in Mauritius – 2013; 2016

Table 84 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Morocco – 2000 – 2012

Table 85 – Mobile subscribers by operator, technology and annual change in MoroccoSeptember 2011

Table 86 – Maroc Telecom domestic mobile subscribers and market share in Morocco – 2002 – 2011

Table 87 – Maroc Telecom domestic blended monthly mobile ARPU and churn rate in Morocco – 2003 – 2011

Table 88 – Maroc Telecom domestic mobile revenue and EBIT in Morocco – 2005 – 2011

Table 89 – Meditel mobile subscribers and market share in Morocco – 2002 – 2011

Table 90 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Mozambique – 1997 – 2012

Table 91 – Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change in MozambiqueSeptember 2010

Table 92 – Vodacom Mozambique financial results – 2007 – 2010

Table 93 – mCel 3G prepaid pricing in MozambiqueMay 2011

Table 94 – Vodacom 3G post-paid pricing in Mozambique – 2010 vs. 2011

Table 95 – Vodacom Mozambique ARPU – 2004 – 2010

Table 96 – Forecast – mobile subscribers in Mozambique – 2013; 2016

Table 97 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Namibia – 1995 – 2012

Table 98 – MTC ARPU in Namibia – 2004 – 2010

Table 99 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Nigeria – 1998 – 2012

Table 100 – Mobile subscribers by operator, technology in NigeriaJune 2011

Table 101 – MTN Nigeria ARPU – 2002 – 2011

Table 102 – Zain Nigeria ARPU – 2006 – 2009

Table 103 – Starcomms total and mobility/mobile subscribers in Nigeria – 2005 – 2011

Table 104 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Nigeria – 2013; 2016

Table 105 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Rwanda – 1999 – 2012

Table 106 – Mobile subscribers by operator in RwandaNovember 2011

Table 107 – MTN Rwanda ARPU – 2002 – 2011

Table 108 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Rwanda – 2013; 2016

Table 109 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Senegal – 2000 – 2012

Table 110 – Mobile subscribers by operator, technology, annual change in SenegalJune 2011

Table 111 – Sonatel/Orange mobile subscribers in Senegal – 1999 – 2011

Table 112 – Orange mobile ARPU, prepaid versus postpaid in Senegal – 2004 – 2011

Table 113 – GSM licences and operations in Sierra Leone – 1998 – 2011

Table 114 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Sierra Leone – 2000 – 2012

Table 115 – Zain SL subscribers and market share in Sierra Leone – 2003 – 2009

Table 116 – Celtel/Zain SL ARPU in Sierra Leone – 2002 – 2009

Table 117 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in South Africa – 1994 – 2012

Table 118 – Vodacom South Africa subscribers and market share – 2002 – 2011

Table 119 – Vodacom South Africa key statistics – year ended March 2011

Table 120 – MTN South Africa subscribers and market share – 2002 – 2011

Table 121 – MTN South Africa key statistics – six months ended June 2011

Table 122 – Vodacom broadband subscribers in South Africa – 2006 – 2011

Table 123 – Telkom SA mobile subscribers – 2009 – 2011

Table 124 – Forecast mobile subscribers in South Africa – 2013; 2016

Table 125 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Sudan – 1996 – 2012

Table 126 – Major mobile operators, subscribers and annual change in SudanMarch 2010

Table 127 – Zain Sudan ARPU – 2003 – 2010

Table 128 – MTN Sudan ARPU – 2006 – 2010

Table 129 – Zain Sudan 3G/HSDPA pricing – July 2010

Table 130 – Zain Sudan 3G/HSDPA corporate pricing – July 2010

Table 131 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Swaziland – 1999 – 2012

Table 132 – Swazi MTN messaging prices in Swaziland – 2009; 2010

Table 133 – Swazi MTN ARPU in Swaziland – 2001 – 2011

Table 134 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Tanzania – 1999 – 2012

Table 135 – Mobile subscribers by operator and annual change in TanzaniaSeptember 2011

Table 136 – Vodacom Tanzania ARPU – 2003 – 2011

Table 137 – Zain Tanzania ARPU – 2002 – 2009

Table 138 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Tanzania – 2013; 2016

Table 139 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Tunisia – 1995 – 2012

Table 140 – Mobile subscribers by operator, technology and annual change in TunisiaSeptember 2011

Table 141 – Tunisiana subscribers and blended monthly ARPU – 2002 – 2011

Table 142 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Uganda – 1996 – 2012

Table 143 – MTN Uganda subscribers – 2000 – 2011

Table 144 – MTN Uganda ARPU – 2002 – 2011

Table 145 – Zain Uganda subscribers – 2002 – 2009

Table 146 – Zain Uganda ARPU – 2006 – 2009

Table 147 – Forecast mobile subscribers in Uganda – 2013; 2016

Table 148 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Zambia – 1995 – 2012

Table 149 – Mobile ARPU in Zambia – Zain and MTN – 2005 – 2009/10

Table 150 – Forecast – mobile subscribers in Zambia – 2013; 2016

Table 151 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Zimbabwe – 1999 – 2012

Table 152 – Mobile operators, subscribers and annual change in ZimbabweMarch 2010

Chart 1 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Algeria – 2002 – 2012

Chart 2 – Mobile operators by market share in AlgeriaSeptember 2010

Chart 3 – Mobile subscribers in Angola – 2002 – 2012

Chart 4 – Mobile subscribers in Botswana – 2002 – 2012

Chart 5 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Burkina Faso – 2002 – 2012

Chart 6 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Burundi – 2002 – 2012

Chart 7 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Cameroon – 2002 – 2012

Chart 8 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Chad – 2002 – 2012

Chart 9 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Cote d Ivoire – 2002 – 2012

Chart 10 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in DRC – 2002 – 2012

Chart 11 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Djibouti – 2002 – 2012

Chart 12 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Egypt – 2002 – 2012

Chart 13 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Eritrea – 2004 – 2012

Chart 14 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Ethiopia – 2002 – 2012

Chart 15 – Mobile subscribers in Gabon – 2002 – 2012

Chart 16 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Gambia – 2002 – 2012

Chart 17 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate – 2002 – 2012

Chart 18 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Kenya – 1999-2012

Chart 19 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Lesotho – 2002 – 2012

Chart 20 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Liberia – 2002 – 2012

Chart 21 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Libya – 2002 – 2012

Chart 22 – Mobile subscribers in Madagascar – 2002 – 2012

Chart 23 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Malawi – 2002 – 2012

Chart 24 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Mali – 2002 – 2012

Chart 25 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Mauritius – 2002 – 2012

Chart 26 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Morocco – 2002 – 2012

Chart 27 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Mozambique – 2002 – 2012

Chart 28 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Namibia – 2002 – 2012

Chart 29 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Nigeria – 2002 – 2012

Chart 30 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Rwanda – 2002 – 2012

Chart 31 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Senegal – 2002 – 2012

Chart 32 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Sierra Leone – 2002 – 2012

Chart 33 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in South Africa – 2002 – 2012

Chart 34 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Sudan – 2002 – 2012

Chart 35 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Swaziland – 2002 – 2012

Chart 36 – Mobile subscribers in Tanzania – 2002 – 2012

Chart 37 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Tunisia – 2002 – 2012

Chart 38 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Uganda – 2002 – 2012

Chart 39 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Zambia – 2002 – 2012

Chart 40 – Mobile subscribers and penetration rate in Zimbabwe – 2002 – 2012

Exhibit 1 – An analysis of Egypt‘s third mobile licence valuation

Exhibit 2 – Vodafone Egypt’s public listing and delisting

Exhibit 3 – Emergency rescue scheme for Lake Victoria in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda

Exhibit 4 – Nigerian Ownership battle – from EWN to Vee Networks to V-Mobile to Celtel/Zain to Bharti

Exhibit 5 – e-Soko in Rwanda

Exhibit 6 – Spotlight on Vodacom GSM community payphones in South Africa

Exhibit 7 – Map of Sudan

Exhibit 8 – Swazi MTN licence conditions in Swaziland

Exhibit 9 – Vodacom – in and out and back in Zambia

 

 

 

To order this report:

Wireless Technology Industry: Africa – Mobile Voice Market and Major Network Operators

 

 

More Market Research Report

 

 

 

Check our Industry Analysis and Insights

 

 

Nicolas Bombourg
Reportlinker
Email: nicolasbombourg@reportlinker.com
US: (805)652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626

SOURCE Reportlinker

 

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Airtel partners with Pan African bank to launch Airtel Money in Chad

Posted on 19 June 2012 by The African Press Organization

NDJAMENA, Chad, June 18, 2012/African Press Organization (APO)/ –

• Customers can facilitate financial transactions and make utility payments on their mobile phones

• Informal Retailers can generate additional income, contribute to job creation, enhance new business opportunities and bring significant benefits to Chad’s financial sector

Airtel Chad (http://www.airtel.com) has collaborated with one of the leading banks on the continent – ECOBANK- to launch Airtel Money in the West African nation. Touted as the first Mobile commerce product in the country, the service will allow subscribers to carry out financial transactions on their mobile phones and enhance the delivery of financial services at affordable costs.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/airtel.jpg

The launch ceremony of the new service was held at the Kempinski Hotel in the capital Ndjamena, in the presence of various dignitaries, notably Prime Minister Emmanuel Nadingar, Telecommunicatons Minister Alingue Jean Bawoyeu and members of the diplomatic corps in Chad.

In many developing regions, including Africa, the availability of formal financial services remains the prerogative of a privileged few, sometimes leaving the majority of the population with informal, expensive and unreliable channels as the only recourse for their transactions. It is in light of this that recent studies have suggested that the total value of mobile money transfers in Africa is expected to exceed USD 200 billion in 2015 due to the growing confidence of users in the system, coupled with a wide range of services on offer.

Major players in the market, especially banks and mobile operators, have expressed an interest to fill this much needed gap. Airtel has been rolling out its m commerce service across Africa to current and potential customers, enabling various modes of financial transactions on mobile phones.

Speaking at the launch ceremony, Mr. Salia Gbane, CEO of Airtel Chad, said: “This service allows customers to send money to their relatives, pay essential bills such as electricity and water, tuition fees, bookings and even buy groceries without having to carry cash. The phone essentially becomes an electronic wallet.

He added “This partnership clearly demonstrate the revolutionary role that mobile communications can play in improving the living conditions of the communities that we serve” Gbane said.

Transactions will be very simple and completely secure. All the customer needs is a mobile phone and a personal password whenever he wants to complete a transaction. A simple registration is sufficient to enjoy this service. The client must be an Airtel subscriber, have a valid identification document and fill out a registration form.

Mr. Gbane was keen on reiterating that Airtel Money will be available in all areas covered by the Airtel network and encouraged the Chadian population to enjoy the service, which will connect communities and businesses across the country.

Distributed by the African Press Organization on behalf of Bharti Airtel Limited.

About Bharti Airtel

Bharti Airtel Limited (http://www.airtel.com) is a leading integrated telecommunications company with operations in 20 countries across Asia and Africa. Headquartered in New Delhi, India, the company ranks amongst the top 5 mobile service providers globally in terms of subscribers. In India, the company’s product offerings include 2G, 3G and 4G services, fixed line, high speed broadband through DSL, IPTV, DTH, enterprise services including national & international long distance services to carriers. In the rest of the geographies, it offers 2G, 3G mobile services. Bharti Airtel had over 253 million customers across its operations at the end of April 2012. To know more please visit, http://www.airtel.com

For further clarifications contact:

Michael Okwiri | Vice President – Corporate Communications & PR | Airtel Africa

Michael.Okwiri @ africa.airtel.com

SOURCE

Bharti Airtel Limited

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