Custom Search

Money Transfers Job Africa Map Weather

Tag Archive | "Commerce"

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Living the FATCA life in Africa: New U.S. tax regulations add to burden of compliance on financial institutions across Africa

Posted on 21 May 2013 by Eugene Skrynnyk

Eugene Skrynnyk

Eugene Skrynnyk (CIPM, MILE, BComm) is a senior manager and specialist for the asset management industry in the Africa Sub-Area at Ernst & Young in Cape Town, South Africa.

Eugene Skrynnyk is the Ernst & Young Senior Manager and specialist for the asset management industry in the Africa Sub-Area.

Eugene holds a Certificate in Investment Performance Measurement (CIPM), Master of International Law and Economics (MILE) and Bachelor of Commerce and Finance (B.Comm.).

 

When the U.S. Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) and Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) issued final Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”) regulations in January of this year, there was a sigh of relief that the financial services industry in Africa could begin to digest FATCA’s obligations. However, achieving FATCA compliance remains a challenge for banks operating across Africa.

FATCA is already law in the U.S. but negotiations are under way to enshrine it in national law of countries around the world via intergovernmental agreements (“IGAs”) with the U.S. While a variety of African jurisdictions will each face unique obstacles with FATCA compliance, many in the industry share a general unease with FATCA’s scope, as well as scepticism that FATCA’s rewards (an estimated US$1 billion in additional tax revenue annually) justify its expenses. Generally, FATCA attempts to combat U.S. tax evasion by requiring that non-U.S. financial institutions report the identities of U.S. shareholders or customers, or otherwise face a 30% withholding tax on their U.S. source income. Overwhelmingly, FATCA compliance obligations apply even where there is very little risk of U.S. tax evasion and it impacts all payers, including foreign payers of “withholdable payments” made to any foreign entities affecting deposit accounts, custody and investments.

General issues in Africa

Concerns about privacy abound. FATCA requires financial institutions to report to the IRS certain information about U.S. persons. For this reason, IGAs are being put in place so that institutions could instead report information to their local tax authority rather than the IRS. In some jurisdictions, investment funds and insurance companies are permitted to disclose information with client consent. In other jurisdictions, such disclosure is prohibited without further changes to domestic law. The process to make necessary changes locally involves time and effort.

Cultural differences in Africa need to be considered. In certain situations FATCA requires that financial institutions ask a customer who was born in the United States to submit documents explaining why the customer abandoned U.S. citizenship or did not obtain it at birth. African financial institutions never pose such a delicate and private question to their customers. Even apparently straight-forward requirements may pose challenges; for example, FATCA requires that customers make representations about their identities “under penalty of perjury” in certain situations. Few countries have a custom of making legal oaths, so it would not be surprising if African customers will be reluctant to give them.

FATCA contains partial exemptions (i.e., “deemed compliance”) and also exceptions for certain financial institutions and products that are less likely to be used by U.S. tax evaders. It still has to be seen to what extent these exemptions have utility for financial institutions in Africa. For example, the regulations include an exemption for retirement funds and also partially exempt “restricted funds” — funds that prohibit investment by U.S. persons. Although many non-U.S. funds have long restricted investment by U.S. persons because of the U.S. federal securities laws, this exemption could be less useful than it first appears. It should be pointed out that the exemption also requires that funds be sold exclusively to limited categories of FATCA-compliant or exempt institutions and distributors. These categories are themselves difficult for African institutions to qualify for. For example, a restricted fund may sell to certain distributors who agree not to sell to U.S. persons (“restricted distributors”). But restricted distributors must operate solely in the country of their incorporation, a true obstacle in smaller markets where many distributors must operate regionally to attain scale.

Other permitted distribution channels for restricted funds are “local banks,” which are not allowed to have any operations outside of their jurisdiction of incorporation and may not advertise the availability of U.S. dollar denominated investments.

Challenges and lessons learned – the African perspective

Financial institutions will have to consider what steps to take to prepare for FATCA compliance and take into account other FATCA obligations, such as account due diligence and withholding against non-compliant U.S. accountholders and/or financial institutions.

The core of FATCA is the process of reviewing customer records to search for “U.S. indicia” — that is, evidence that a customer might be a U.S. taxpayer. Under certain circumstances, FATCA requires financial institutions to look through their customers and counterparties’ ownership to find “substantial U.S. owners” (generally, certain U.S. persons holding more than 10% of an entity). In many countries the existing anti-money laundering legislation generally requires that financial institutions look through entities only when there is a 20% or 25% owner, leaving a gap between information that may be needed for FATCA compliance and existing procedures. Even how to deal with non-FATCA compliant financial institutions and whether to completely disengage business ties with them, remains open.

The following is an outline of some of the lessons learned in approaching FATCA compliance and the considerations financial institutions should make:

Focus on reducing the problem

Reducing the problem through the analysis and filtering of legal entities, products, customer types, distribution channels and account values, which may be prudently de-scoped, can enable financial institutions to address their distinct challenges and to identify areas of significant impact across their businesses. This quickly scopes the problem areas and focuses the resource and budget effort to where it is most necessary.

Select the most optimal design solution

FATCA legislation is complex and comprehensive as it attempts to counter various potential approaches to evade taxes. Therefore, understanding the complexities of FATCA and distilling its key implications is crucial in formulating a well rounded, easily executable FATCA compliance programme in the limited time left.

Selecting an option for compliance is dependent on the nature of the business and the impact of FATCA on the financial institution. However, due to compliance time constraints and the number of changes required by financial institutions, the solution design may well require tactical solutions with minimal business impact and investment. This will allow financial institutions to achieve compliance by applying low cost ‘work arounds’ and process changes. Strategic and long-term solutions can be better planned and phased-in with less disruption to the financial institution thereafter.

Concentrate on critical activities for 2014

FATCA has phased timelines, which run from 2014 to 2017 and beyond. By focusing on the “must-do” activities, which require compliance as of 1 January 2014 – such as appointing a Responsible Officer, registering with the IRS, and addressing new client on-boarding processes and systems – financial institutions can dedicate the necessary resources more efficiently and effectively to meet immediate deadlines.

Clear ownership – both centrally and within local subsidiaries

FATCA is a strategic issue for the business, requiring significant and widespread change. Typically it starts as a ‘tax issue’ but execution has impacts across IT, AML/KYC, operations, sales, distribution and client relationship management. It is imperative to get the right stakeholders and support onboard to ensure that the operational changes are being coordinated, managed and implemented by the necessary multidisciplinary teams across the organization. These include business operations, IT, marketing, and legal and compliance, to name but a few. Early involvement and clear ownership is key from the start.

Understand your footprint in Africa

Many African financial institutions have operations in various African countries and even overseas, and have strategically chosen to make further investments throughout Africa. The degree to which these African countries have exposure to the FATCA regulations needs to be understood. It is best to quickly engage with appropriate stakeholders, understand how FATCA impacts these African countries and the financial institutions’ foreign subsidiaries, and find solutions that enable pragmatic compliance.

What next for financial institutions in Africa?

Negotiations with the U.S. are under way with over 60 countries to enshrine FATCA in national law of countries around the world via IGAs. Implementation of FATCA is approaching on 1 January 2014 and many local financial institutions have either not started or are just at the early stages of addressing the potential impact of FATCA. In South Africa, only few of the leading banks are completing impact assessments and already optimizing solutions. Other financial services groups and asset management institutions are in the process of tackling the impact assessment. Industry representative in Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria and Zimbabwe have started engaging relevant government and industry stakeholders, but the awareness is seemingly oblivious to date. In the rest of Africa, FATCA is mainly unheard of.

Financial institutions choosing to comply with FATCA will first need to appoint a responsible officer for FATCA and register with the IRS, ensure proper new client on-boarding procedures are in place, then identify and categorize all customers, and eventually report U.S. persons to the IRS (or local tax authorities in IGA jurisdictions). Institutions will also need to consider implementing a host of other time-consuming operational tasks, including revamping certain electronic systems to capture applicable accountholder information and/or to accommodate the new reporting and withholding requirements, enhancing customer on-boarding processes, and educating both customers and staff on the new regulations. Where possible, institutions should seek to achieve these tasks through enhancing existing initiations so as to minimise the cost and disruption to the business.

Conclusion

Financial institutions in Africa face tight FATCA compliance timelines with limited budgets, resources, time, and expertise available. This is coupled with having to fulfil multiple other regulatory requirements. To add to the burden, FATCA has given stimulus to several countries in the European Union to start discussing a multilateral effort against tax evasion. The support of other countries in the IGA process indicates that some of these countries will follow with their own FATCA-equivalent legislation in an attempt to increase local tax revenues at a time when economies around the world are under unprecedented pressure. The best approach for African financial services industry groups is to engage their local governments in dialogue with the IRS and Treasury, while for African financial institutions to pro-actively assess their FATCA strategic and operational burdens as they inevitably prepare for compliance.

 

About Ernst & Young

Ernst & Young is a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services. Worldwide, our 167,000 people are united by our shared values and an unwavering commitment to quality. We make a difference by helping our people, our clients and our wider communities achieve their potential.

The Ernst & Young Africa Sub-Area consists of practices in 28 countries across the African continent. We pride ourselves in our integrated operating model which enables us to serve our clients on a seamless basis across the continent, as well as across the world.

Ernst & Young South Africa has a Level two, AAA B-BBEE rating. As a recognised value adding enterprise, our clients are able to claim B-BBEE recognition of 156.25%.

Ernst & Young refers to the global organisation of member firms of Ernst & Young Global Limited, each of which is a separate legal entity. All Ernst & Young practices in the Africa Sub Area are members of Ernst & Young Africa Limited (NPC). Ernst & Young Africa Limited (NPC) in turn is a member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee. Neither Ernst & Young Global Limited nor Ernst & Young Limited (NPC) provides services to clients.

For more information about our organisation, please visit www.ey.com/za

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Un nouveau rapport de la Banque mondiale prévoit un triplement de la part des pays en développement dans les investissements mondiaux d’ici 2030

Posted on 20 May 2013 by Africa Business

D’ici dix-sept ans, les pays en développement, et principalement ceux d’Asie de l’Est et d’Amérique latine, abriteront la moitié des capitaux mondiaux — soit 158 000 milliards de dollars (en dollars de 2010) — contre un tiers seulement aujourd’hui. C’est ce que prévoit la dernière édition des Global Development Horizons (GDH) de la Banque mondiale, un rapport qui étudie l’évolution probable des tendances en matière d’investissement, d’épargne et de mouvement de capitaux sur les vingt prochaines années.

Selon cette nouvelle publication intitulée Capital for the Future: Saving and Investment in an Interdependent World (« Les capitaux de demain : épargne et investissement dans un monde interdépendant »), les pays en développement, qui ne représentaient qu’un cinquième des investissements mondiaux en 2000, devrait voir leur part tripler d’ici 2030. Les changements démographiques joueront un grand rôle dans ces mutations structurelles puisque la population mondiale devrait passer de 7 milliards en 2010 à 8,5 milliards en 2030 tandis que les pays développés connaissent un vieillissement rapide.

« Le rapport GDH repose sur l’exploitation d’une somme phénoménale d’informations statistiques et constitue l’un des efforts les plus aboutis de projection dans un futur éloigné », explique Kaushik Basu, premier vice-président et économiste en chef de la Banque mondiale. « L’expérience de pays aussi divers que la Corée du Sud, l’Indonésie, le Brésil, la Turquie et l’Afrique du Sud nous montre combien le rôle de l’investissement est crucial pour la croissance à long terme. Dans moins d’une génération, l’investissement mondial sera dominé par les pays en développement, la Chine et l’Inde en tête. Ces deux pays devraient, en effet, assurer 38 % des investissements bruts mondiaux en 2030. Ces changements vont modifier le paysage économique mondial et c’est ce qu’étudie le rapport GDH. »

Le rattrapage des retards de productivité, l’intégration croissante dans les marchés mondiaux, la poursuite de bonnes politiques macroéconomiques ainsi que les progrès accomplis dans l’éducation et la santé sont autant de facteurs d’accélération de la croissance qui créent d’énormes opportunités d’investissement, lesquelles entraînent à leur tour une modification de l’équilibre économique mondial en faveur des pays en développement..À cela s’ajoute l’explosion démographique de la jeunesse, qui contribuera aussi à doper l’investissement : la population globale des pays en développement devrait s’accroître de 1,4 milliard d’individus d’ici 2030, sachant que le bénéfice de ce « dividende démographique » n’a pas encore été totalement récolté, en particulier dans les régions relativement plus jeunes que sont l’Afrique subsaharienne et l’Asie du Sud.

Les pays en développement auront probablement, enfin, les ressources nécessaires pour financer des investissements massifs dans les infrastructures et les services, au premier rang desquels l’éducation et la santé, ce qui est une bonne nouvelle. Les robustes taux d’épargne des pays en développement devraient culminer à 34 % du revenu national en 2014 et enregistrer une moyenne annuelle de 32 % jusqu’en 2030. Globalement, le monde en développement représentera 62 à 64 % de l’épargne mondiale en 2030 (25 à 27 000 milliards), contre 45 % en 2010.

Toutefois, comme le souligne Hans Timmer, directeur du Groupe des perspectives de développement à la Banque mondiale, « malgré de hauts niveaux d’épargne, et pour être en mesure de financer leurs importants besoins d’investissements, les pays en développement devront à l’avenir accroître considérablement leur participation, actuellement limitée, aux marchés financiers internationaux s’ils souhaitent tirer parti des profonds bouleversements en cours ».

Le rapport GDH envisage deux scénarios qui diffèrent par la vitesse de convergence entre les niveaux de revenu par habitant des pays développés et des pays en développement, et par le rythme des transformations structurelles des deux groupes (sur le plan du développement du secteur financier et de l’amélioration des institutions notamment). Le premier scénario prévoit une convergence progressive entre les pays développés et les pays en développement et le second une évolution nettement plus rapide.

Pour les vingt prochaines années, le scénario progressif et le scénario rapide prévoient une croissance économique moyenne de, respectivement, 2,6 % et 3 % par an dans le monde, et de 4,8 % et 5,5 % dans les pays en développement.

Dans les deux hypothèses, à l’horizon 2030, les services représenteront plus de 60 % de l’emploi total dans les pays en développement et plus de 50 % du commerce mondial. Ce changement est lié à l’augmentation de la demande en services d’infrastructure induite par l’évolution démographique. Le rapport GDH chiffre d’ailleurs à 14 600 milliards de dollars les besoins de financement d’infrastructures du monde en développement d’ici 2030.

Le rapport souligne aussi le vieillissement des populations d’Asie de l’Est, d’Europe de l’Est et d’Asie centrale, régions dans lesquelles les taux d’épargne privée devraient afficher une baisse particulièrement marquée. L’évolution démographique mettra à l’épreuve la pérennité des finances publiques et les États devront résoudre des enjeux complexes afin de maîtriser la charge des soins de santé et des retraites sans imposer de trop grandes difficultés aux personnes âgées. L’Afrique subsaharienne qui a une population relativement jeune, en augmentation rapide, et qui connaît une solide croissance économique, sera la seule région à ne pas enregistrer de baisse du taux d’épargne.

En termes absolus, l’épargne continuera néanmoins à être dominée par l’Asie et le Moyen-Orient. Selon le scénario de convergence progressive, en 2030, la Chine épargnera nettement plus que les autres pays en développement (9 000 milliards en dollars de 2010), suivie de loin par l’Inde (1 700 milliards), dépassant les niveaux d’épargne du Japon et des États-Unis dans les années 2020.

Selon le même scénario, à l’horizon 2030, la Chine représentera à elle seule 30 % des investissements mondiaux, tandis que le Brésil, l’Inde et la Russie y contribueront ensemble à hauteur de 13 %. En volume, les investissements atteindront 15 000 milliards (en dollars de 2010) dans les pays en développement contre 10 000 milliards pour les pays à revenu élevé. La Chine et l’Inde représenteront près de la moitié des investissements mondiaux dans le secteur manufacturier.

« Le rapport GDH met clairement en évidence le rôle croissant des pays en développement dans l’économie mondiale, et c’est incontestablement une avancée significative », indique Maurizio Bussolo, économiste principal à la Banque mondiale et auteur principal du rapport, tout en soulignant que « cette meilleure répartition des richesses entre pays ne signifie pas que tous les habitants des différents pays en bénéficieront de manière égale ».

Selon le rapport, les groupes de population les moins instruits d’un pays, qui ont peu ou pas du tout d’épargne, se trouvent dans l’impossibilité d’améliorer leur capacité de gain et, pour les plus pauvres, d’échapper à l’engrenage de la pauvreté.

Maurizio Bussolo conclut : « Les responsables politiques des pays en développement ont un rôle déterminant à jouer pour stimuler l’épargne privée par des mesures qui permettront d’élever le capital humain, en particulier pour les plus pauvres ».

Points marquants des différentes régions

L’Asie de l’Est et le Pacifique enregistreront une baisse de leur taux d’épargne et une chute encore plus forte de leur taux d’investissement, taux qui resteront toutefois élevés à l’échelle internationale. Malgré cette baisse des taux, la part de la région dans l’investissement et l’épargne continuera d’augmenter au plan mondial jusqu’en 2030 en raison d’une solide croissance économique. La région connaît un fort dividende démographique, avec moins de 4 personnes d’âge non actif pour 10 personnes d’âge actif, ce qui représente le plus faible taux de dépendance du monde. Ce dividende arrivera à son terme après avoir atteint un pic en 2015. La croissance de la population active ralentira ensuite et en 2040 la région pourrait afficher l’un des taux de dépendance les plus élevés de toutes les régions en développement (avec plus de 5,5 personnes d’âge non actif pour 10 personnes d’âge actif). La Chine, grand moteur de la région, devrait continuer à enregistrer d’importants excédents de la balance des opérations courantes, en raison de fortes baisses de son taux d’investissement liées à l’évolution du pays vers un système de plus faible engagement public dans les investissements.

L’Europe de l’Est et l’Asie centrale forment la région la plus avancée en termes de transition démographique, qui devrait être la seule du monde en développement à atteindre une croissance démographique nulle d’ici 2030. Ce vieillissement, qui devrait ralentir la croissance économique de la région, pourrait aussi entraîner une baisse du taux d’épargne plus forte que dans les autres régions en développement, à l’exception de l’Asie de l’Est. Le taux d’épargne pourrait ainsi descendre au-dessous du taux d’investissement, ce qui obligerait les pays de la région à attirer des flux de capitaux extérieurs pour financer leurs investissements. La région devra également faire face à une importante pression budgétaire due au vieillissement. La Turquie, par exemple, pourrait voir ses dépenses de retraites publiques augmenter de plus de 50 % d’ici 2030 en application du régime actuel. Plusieurs autres pays de la région seront aussi confrontés à d’importantes augmentations des dépenses de retraites et de santé.

L’Amérique latine et les Caraïbes forment une région où l’épargne est historiquement faible, qui pourrait afficher l’épargne la plus faible au monde en 2030. La démographie devrait certes y jouer un rôle positif (avec une baisse du taux de dépendance jusqu’en 2025) mais cet avantage sera probablement neutralisé par le développement du marché financier (qui réduit l’épargne de précaution) et une croissance économique modérée. De même, l’effet positif puis négatif de la démographie sur la croissance de la population active devrait d’abord entraîner une hausse du taux d’investissement à court terme puis une baisse progressive. Toutefois, la relation entre inégalité et épargne pourrait déboucher sur un autre scénario dans cette région. Comme ailleurs, les ménages les plus pauvres ont tendance à moins épargner ; l’amélioration des capacités de gain, l’augmentation des revenus et la réduction des inégalités pourraient donc doper l’épargne nationale et surtout contribuer à rompre le cercle vicieux de la pauvreté entretenu par le faible niveau d’épargne des ménages pauvres.

Le Moyen-Orient et l’Afrique du Nord disposent d’une importante marge de développement du marché financier, susceptible de soutenir l’investissement mais aussi, en raison du vieillissement de la population, de réduire l’épargne. De ce fait, les excédents de la balance des opérations courantes pourraient baisser modérément jusqu’en 2030, en fonction du rythme du développement du marché financier. Cette région est dans une phase de transition démographique relativement précoce qui se caractérise par une croissance encore rapide de la population générale et de la population active en même temps qu’une augmentation de la part des personnes âgées. Le changement de la structure des ménages pourrait aussi influencer les modèles d’épargne. Cette structure pourrait, en effet, évoluer d’une organisation intergénérationnelle, où la famille prend en charge les anciens, vers une structure composée de ménages plus petits avec une plus grande dépendance des personnes âgées vis-à-vis des revenus patrimoniaux. C’est dans cette région que les ménages à faible revenu recourent le moins aux institutions financières officielles pour épargner, d’où une marge importante de développement du rôle des marchés financiers dans l’épargne des ménages.

L’Asie du Sud restera l’une des régions où l’on épargne et investit le plus jusqu’en 2030. Toutefois, compte tenu des possibilités de progression rapide de la croissance économique et des marchés financiers, l’évolution de l’épargne, de l’investissement et des flux de capitaux peut varier considérablement : dans l’hypothèse d’une progression plus rapide de la croissance économique et des marchés financiers, les taux d’investissement resteront élevés tandis que l’épargne baissera considérablement, d’où d’importants déficits de la balance des opérations courantes. L’Asie du Sud est une région jeune qui, vers 2035, aura probablement le plus haut ratio au monde des personnes d’âge actif par rapport aux personnes d’âge non actif. Le phénomène général de déplacement des investissements vers le secteur manufacturier et le secteur des services aux dépens de l’agriculture devrait être particulièrement marqué en Asie du Sud ; la part de cette région dans les investissements globaux devrait ainsi presque doubler dans le secteur manufacturier et gagner au moins huit points de pourcentage dans le secteur des services, dépassant les deux tiers du total.

En Afrique subsaharienne, le taux d’investissement restera stable en raison d’une solide croissance de la population active. C’est la seule région qui n’enregistrera pas de baisse de son taux d’épargne dans l’hypothèse d’un développement modéré des marchés financiers, le vieillissement n’y étant pas un facteur significatif. Dans le scénario d’une croissance plus rapide, les pays africains plus pauvres connaîtront un développement plus marqué des marchés financiers et les investisseurs étrangers seront de plus en plus disposés à financer des investissements dans la région. L’Afrique subsaharienne est actuellement la région la plus jeune, qui affiche aussi le plus haut ratio de dépendance. Ce ratio enregistrera une baisse constante sur toute la période considérée et au-delà, entraînant un dividende démographique durable. C’est cette région qui aura les plus grands besoins d’investissement en infrastructures au cours des vingt prochaines années (en pourcentage du PIB). Dans le même temps, on observera probablement un changement dans le financement des investissements en infrastructures qui devrait être davantage ouvert au secteur privé, avec une augmentation substantielle des afflux de capitaux privés, venant notamment des autres régions en développement.

Source: WorldBank.org

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Forte progression du poids du monde en développement d’ici 2030

Posted on 19 May 2013 by Africa Business

  • La part des pays en développement dans les investissements mondiaux va tripler d’ici 2030.
  • La Chine et l’Inde seront les plus grands investisseurs du monde en développement.
  • L’amélioration des conditions de vie des populations pauvres passe par une meilleure éducation.

Dans moins d’une génération, le monde en développement dominera l’épargne et les investissements mondiaux. C’est ce qui ressort du dernier rapport Global Development Horizons (GDH).

Ce rapport étudie l’évolution probable des tendances en matière d’investissement, d’épargne et de mouvement de capitaux au cours des vingt prochaines années. Il prévoit que, d’ici 2030, les pays en développement, et principalement ceux d’Asie de l’Est et d’Amérique latine, abriteront la moitié des capitaux mondiaux — soit 158 000 milliards de dollars (en dollars de 2010) — contre un tiers seulement aujourd’hui.

Selon cette nouvelle publication intitulée Capital for the Future: Saving and Investment in an Interdependent World (« Les capitaux de demain : épargne et investissement dans un monde interdépendant »), les pays en développement, qui ne représentaient qu’un cinquième des investissements mondiaux en 2000, devrait voir leur part tripler d’ici 2030.

Le rattrapage des retards de productivité, l’intégration croissante dans les marchés mondiaux, la poursuite de bonnes politiques macroéconomiques ainsi que les progrès accomplis dans l’éducation et la santé sont autant de facteurs d’accélération de la croissance qui créent d’énormes opportunités d’investissement, lesquelles entraînent à leur tour une modification de l’équilibre économique mondial en faveur des pays en développement.

À cela s’ajoute l’explosion démographique de la jeunesse, qui contribuera aussi à doper l’investissement. D’ici 2020, c’est-à-dire dans moins de sept ans, la croissance de la population mondiale en âge de travailler sera exclusivement déterminée par les pays en développement dont la population globale devrait s’accroître d’1,4 milliard d’individus d’ici 2030. Or tout le bénéfice de ce « dividende démographique » n’a pas encore été récolté, en particulier dans les régions relativement plus jeunes que sont l’Afrique subsaharienne et l’Asie du Sud.

Le rapport GDH envisage deux scénarios qui diffèrent par la vitesse de convergence entre les niveaux de revenu par habitant des pays développés et des pays en développement, et par le rythme des transformations structurelles des deux groupes (sur le plan du développement du secteur financier et de l’amélioration des institutions notamment). Le premier scénario prévoit une convergence progressive entre les pays développés et les pays en développement et le second une évolution nettement plus rapide.

Dans les deux hypothèses, à l’horizon 2030, les services représenteront plus de 60 % de l’emploi total dans les pays en développement et plus de 50 % du commerce mondial. Ce changement est lié à l’augmentation de la demande en services d’infrastructure induite par l’évolution démographique. Le rapport GDH chiffre d’ailleurs à 14 600 milliards de dollars les besoins de financement d’infrastructures du monde en développement d’ici 2030.

Le rapport souligne aussi le vieillissement des populations d’Asie de l’Est, d’Europe de l’Est et d’Asie centrale, régions dans lesquelles les taux d’épargne privée devraient afficher une baisse particulièrement marquée. L’évolution démographique mettra à l’épreuve la pérennité des finances publiques et les États devront résoudre des enjeux complexes afin de maîtriser la charge des soins de santé et des retraites sans imposer de trop grandes difficultés aux personnes âgées. L’Afrique subsaharienne qui a une population relativement jeune, en augmentation rapide, et qui connaît une solide croissance économique, sera la seule région à ne pas enregistrer de baisse du taux d’épargne.

Open Quotes

Les responsables politiques des pays en développement ont un rôle déterminant à jouer pour stimuler l’épargne privée par des mesures qui permettront d’élever le capital humain, en particulier pour les plus pauvres. Close Quotes

Maurizio Bussolo
Auteur principal du rapport, Global Development Horizons 2013

En termes absolus, l’épargne continuera néanmoins à être dominée par l’Asie et le Moyen-Orient. Selon le scénario de convergence progressive, en 2030, la Chine épargnera nettement plus que les autres pays en développement (9 000 milliards en dollars de 2010), suivie de loin par l’Inde (1 700 milliards), dépassant les niveaux d’épargne du Japon et des États-Unis dans les années 2020.

Selon le même scénario, à l’horizon 2030, la Chine représentera à elle seule 30 % des investissements mondiaux, tandis que le Brésil, l’Inde et la Russie y contribueront ensemble à hauteur de 13 %. En volume, les investissements atteindront 15 000 milliards (en dollars de 2010) dans les pays en développement contre 10 000 milliards pour les pays à revenu élevé. La Chine et l’Inde seront aussi en tête du classement des plus gros investisseurs du monde en développement, ces deux pays représentant ensemble 38 % des investissements bruts mondiaux en 2030 et près de la moitié des investissements mondiaux dans le secteur manufacturier.

« Le rapport GDH met clairement en évidence le rôle croissant des pays en développement dans l’économie mondiale, et c’est incontestablement une avancée significative », indique Maurizio Bussolo, économiste principal à la Banque mondiale et auteur principal du rapport, tout en soulignant que « cette meilleure répartition des richesses entre pays ne signifie pas que tous les habitants des différents pays en bénéficieront de manière égale ».

Selon le rapport, les groupes de population les moins instruits d’un pays, qui ont peu ou pas du tout d’épargne, se trouvent dans l’impossibilité d’améliorer leur capacité de gain et, pour les plus pauvres, d’échapper à l’engrenage de la pauvreté.

Et Maurizio Bussolo de conclure : « Les responsables politiques des pays en développement ont un rôle déterminant à jouer pour stimuler l’épargne privée par des mesures qui permettront d’élever le capital humain, en particulier pour les plus pauvres ».

Points marquants des différentes régions

L’Asie de l’Est et le Pacifique enregistreront une baisse de leur taux d’épargne et une chute encore plus forte de leur taux d’investissement, taux qui resteront toutefois élevés à l’échelle internationale. Malgré cette baisse des taux, la part de la région dans l’investissement et l’épargne continuera d’augmenter au plan mondial jusqu’en 2030 en raison d’une solide croissance économique. La région connaît un fort dividende démographique, avec moins de 4 personnes d’âge non actif pour 10 personnes d’âge actif, ce qui représente le plus faible taux de dépendance du monde. Ce dividende arrivera à son terme après avoir atteint un pic en 2015. La croissance de la population active ralentira ensuite et en 2040 la région pourrait afficher l’un des taux de dépendance les plus élevés de toutes les régions en développement (avec plus de 5,5 personnes d’âge non actif pour 10 personnes d’âge actif). La Chine, grand moteur de la région, devrait continuer à enregistrer d’importants excédents de la balance des opérations courantes, en raison de fortes baisses de son taux d’investissement liées à l’évolution du pays vers un système de plus faible engagement public dans les investissements.

 

L’Europe de l’Est et l’Asie centrale forment la région la plus avancée en termes de transition démographique, qui devrait être la seule du monde en développement à atteindre une croissance démographique nulle d’ici 2030. Ce vieillissement, qui devrait ralentir la croissance économique de la région, pourrait aussi entraîner une baisse du taux d’épargne plus forte que dans les autres régions en développement, à l’exception de l’Asie de l’Est. Le taux d’épargne pourrait ainsi descendre au-dessous du taux d’investissement, ce qui obligerait les pays de la région à attirer des flux de capitaux extérieurs pour financer leurs investissements. La région devra également faire face à une importante pression budgétaire due au vieillissement. La Turquie, par exemple, pourrait voir ses dépenses de retraites publiques augmenter de plus de 50 % d’ici 2030 en application du régime actuel. Plusieurs autres pays de la région seront aussi confrontés à d’importantes augmentations des dépenses de retraites et de santé.

 

L’Amérique latine et les Caraïbes forment une région où l’épargne est historiquement faible, qui pourrait afficher l’épargne la plus faible au monde en 2030. La démographie devrait certes y jouer un rôle positif (avec une baisse du taux de dépendance jusqu’en 2025) mais cet avantage sera probablement neutralisé par le développement du marché financier (qui réduit l’épargne de précaution) et une croissance économique modérée. De même, l’effet positif puis négatif de la démographie sur la croissance de la population active devrait d’abord entraîner une hausse du taux d’investissement à court terme puis une baisse progressive. Toutefois, la relation entre inégalité et épargne pourrait déboucher sur un autre scénario dans cette région. Comme ailleurs, les ménages les plus pauvres ont tendance à moins épargner ; l’amélioration des capacités de gain, l’augmentation des revenus et la réduction des inégalités pourraient donc doper l’épargne nationale et surtout contribuer à rompre le cercle vicieux de la pauvreté entretenu par le faible niveau d’épargne des ménages pauvres.

 

Le Moyen-Orient et l’Afrique du Nord disposent d’une importante marge de développement du marché financier, susceptible de soutenir l’investissement mais aussi, en raison du vieillissement de la population, de réduire l’épargne. De ce fait, les excédents de la balance des opérations courantes pourraient baisser modérément jusqu’en 2030, en fonction du rythme du développement du marché financier. Cette région est dans une phase de transition démographique relativement précoce qui se caractérise par une croissance encore rapide de la population générale et de la population active en même temps qu’une augmentation de la part des personnes âgées. Le changement de la structure des ménages pourrait aussi influencer les modèles d’épargne. Cette structure pourrait, en effet, évoluer d’une organisation intergénérationnelle, où la famille prend en charge les anciens, vers une structure composée de ménages plus petits avec une plus grande dépendance des personnes âgées vis-à-vis des revenus patrimoniaux. C’est dans cette région que les ménages à faible revenu recourent le moins aux institutions financières officielles pour épargner, d’où une marge importante de développement du rôle des marchés financiers dans l’épargne des ménages.

L’Asie du Sud restera l’une des régions où l’on épargne et investit le plus jusqu’en 2030. Toutefois, compte tenu des possibilités de progression rapide de la croissance économique et des marchés financiers, l’évolution de l’épargne, de l’investissement et des flux de capitaux peut varier considérablement : dans l’hypothèse d’une progression plus rapide de la croissance économique et des marchés financiers, les taux d’investissement resteront élevés tandis que l’épargne baissera considérablement, d’où d’importants déficits de la balance des opérations courantes. L’Asie du Sud est une région jeune qui, vers 2035, aura probablement le plus haut ratio au monde des personnes d’âge actif par rapport aux personnes d’âge non actif. Le phénomène général de déplacement des investissements vers le secteur manufacturier et le secteur des services aux dépens de l’agriculture devrait être particulièrement marqué en Asie du Sud ; la part de cette région dans les investissements globaux devrait ainsi presque doubler dans le secteur manufacturier et gagner au moins huit points de pourcentage dans le secteur des services, dépassant les deux tiers du total.

 

En Afrique subsaharienne, le taux d’investissement restera stable en raison d’une solide croissance de la population active. C’est la seule région qui n’enregistrera pas de baisse de son taux d’épargne dans l’hypothèse d’un développement modéré des marchés financiers, le vieillissement n’y étant pas un facteur significatif. Dans le scénario d’une croissance plus rapide, les pays africains plus pauvres connaîtront un développement plus marqué des marchés financiers et les investisseurs étrangers seront de plus en plus disposés à financer des investissements dans la région. L’Afrique subsaharienne est actuellement la région la plus jeune, qui affiche aussi le plus haut ratio de dépendance. Ce ratio enregistrera une baisse constante sur toute la période considérée et au-delà, entraînant un dividende démographique durable. C’est cette région qui aura les plus grands besoins d’investissement en infrastructures au cours des vingt prochaines années (en pourcentage du PIB). Dans le même temps, on observera probablement un changement dans le financement des investissements en infrastructures qui devrait être davantage ouvert au secteur privé, avec une augmentation substantielle des afflux de capitaux privés, venant notamment des autres régions en développement.

Source: WorldBank.org

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

TeleCommunication Systems Technology Experts to Discuss International Trade Issues at the Maryland/DC Celebration of International Trade 2013

Posted on 17 May 2013 by Africa Business

 

About TeleCommunication Systems, Inc.
TeleCommunication Systems, Inc. (TCS) (NASDAQ: TSYS) is a world leader in highly reliable and secure mobile communication technology. TCS infrastructure forms the foundation for market leading solutions in E9-1-1, text messaging, commercial location and deployable wireless communications. TCS is at the forefront of new mobile cloud computing services providing wireless applications for navigation, hyper-local search, asset tracking, social applications and telematics. Millions of consumers around the world use TCS wireless apps as a fundamental part of their daily lives. Government agencies utilize TCS’ cyber security expertise, professional services, and highly secure deployable satellite solutions for mission-critical communications. Headquartered in Annapolis, MD, TCS maintains technical, service and sales offices around the world.

 

ANNAPOLIS, Md., May 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ – TeleCommunication Systems, Inc. (TCS) (NASDAQ: TSYS), a world leader in highly reliable and secure mobile communication technology, today announced that TCS Fellow John Linwood Griffin and TCS Senior Customer Executive Victor Hernandez will be participating in panel discussions as part of the Maryland/DC Celebration of International Trade 2013 on Tuesday, May 21 at the Maritime Institute Conference Center in Linthicum, MD. Attendees will experience in-depth discussions with expert-level export executives, leaders, practitioners and government leaders.

  • “Threat Considerations and Risk Mitigation When Doing Business Internationally,” Tuesday, May 21, 8:30 a.m.10:00 a.m.

 

TCS Fellow Dr. John Linwood Griffin will discuss the risk associated with conducting business internationally from a technical security perspective. Risk itself often represents an opportunity – when you understand and interpret technical risks in the context of your business objectives, you are able to make more efficient and competitive decisions. The panelists will engage in a lively early-morning discussion on how to keep risk from always leading to the answer, “no.”

Dr. John Linwood Griffin leads research and engineering programs on computer and communications security at TCS. He has written and taught academic and industrial courses on computer storage, security and networking and has co-authored refereed conference, journal and workshop papers. Among the honors, grants and awards he has received include an invitation to participate in the U.S./Japan Experts’ Workshop on Critical Information Infrastructure Protection, an Intel Foundation Ph.D. Fellowship and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  • “Selling into Emerging Markets – Africa, Middle East and Latin America Explored,” Tuesday, May 21, 10:00 a.m.11:30 a.m.

 

TCS Senior Customer Executive Victor Hernandez will explore the nuances of conducting business in the emerging market of Latin America through the lens of several case studies. In addition, the ability to leverage government resources that are available to ease entrance into new markets from the Departments of Commerce and State will also be addressed by other panelists.

Victor Hernandez is responsible for promoting TCS’ products and services portfolio in the Caribbean and Latin American regions. He has more than 23 years of experience in the Latin American wireless industry and has worked with some of the wireless industry’s biggest names, helping them bridge the business gap between the Caribbean, Latin America and North America.

To learn more about emerging and innovative wireless technologies, visit www.telecomsys.com.

 

SOURCE TeleCommunication Systems, Inc.

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

LICEX 2013 Launched Sustainable development and investment opportunities in Lebanon’s infrastructure

Posted on 14 May 2013 by Africa Business

May 2013 – The Lebanon Infrastructure Conference and Exhibition (LICEX 2013) is taking place in the prestigious Hilton Habtoor Grand Hotel, Beirut on 10 and 11 October 2013 with the support of the Secretariat General of the Higher Council for Privatisation.

Organized by Global Events Partners Ltd (GEP) from the UK and Lebanon’s Planners and Partners S.A.L., LICEX 2013 is also supported by the UK Department of Trade and Industry, the Brazilian Chambers of Commerce and other international and local organizations.

‘’LICEX 2013 will feature an exhibition and conference bringing together the infrastructure community in Lebanon,’’ said Paul Gilbert from the GEP. ‘’Participants will have the opportunity to hear from industry experts about the latest planned infrastructure projects and to discuss the vast investment opportunities available in the country. They will have also a chance to hear from international experts about the latest on the Public Private Partnership.”

“There are a lot of new business opportunities to develop in Lebanon, particularly through possible contracts in the sectors of telecommunications, public transport, power and water management,” explained Dory Renno from Planners and Partners.

Gilbert explained that “LICEX 2013 will open the door for companies to introduce their latest products and services and to position themselves as leaders in their field to develop new business in Lebanon and to take advantage of the infrastructure contracts on offer.”

LICEX 2013 will attract exhibitors and visitors from across the infrastructure supply chain; EPC contractors, Government departments and companies from the following sectors: Construction, Technology, Regulators, Banks, Legal, Consultants, Telecommunications, Electricity, Transportation and Water and Power.

Despite the political instability all around the Middle East, Lebanon has kept a stable economy with a great potential for growth in the future. The constantly increasing interest in the country as a leading tourist destination, along with the emerging oil and gas sector offshore, are just two of many drivers for such an expected growth.

“The timing of the event is excellent,” said Renno, “it coincides with the increased interest and talk about the much-needed partnership between the private and public sectors in Lebanon.” A new PPP law is being prepared within the Lebanese Government, and could be approved at any time.

The programme of LICEX 2013 conference is being developed by government and industry partners. Conference will focus on the following main topics which will be structured in two or three days:

1- The investment climate in Lebanon particularly in infrastructure projects

2- The concept of PPP and its application in Lebanon

3- Presentations by a leading government ministries on their available projects

4- Leading local governments and the projects they have on offer

Speakers will include a large number of high-ranking government officials from involved ministries and governmental organizations, as well as representatives of leading infrastructure companies in Lebanon and internationally.

LICEX 2013 is being developed by the organisers of the Lebanon International Oil and Gas Summit (LIOG) which was held in December 2012 under the patronage of the Ministry of Energy and Water and in collaboration with the Ministry of Finance. It attracted over 330 delegates and 35 speakers from 23 countries representing 150 local and international companies and organizations, including major international oil companies (IOCs).

LICEX 2013 is the next step in the partnership between the UK based Global Event Partners Ltd and their local Lebanese partner company Planners and Partners SAL. Both companies are committed to holding the leading industry events in Beirut, with a strong commitment to Lebanon and its business climate.

To learn more about the event, how to participate and other details on the programme, participating delegates, speakers and sponsors, please visit: www.lebanoninfrastructure.com

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CHINA, AFRICA EXPLORE NEW OPPORTUNITIES TO COOPERATE ON HEALTH CHALLENGES, STRENGTHEN INNOVATIONS

Posted on 13 May 2013 by Amat JENG

Chinese and African leaders will come together at the 4th International Roundtable on China-Africa Health Cooperation to explore new partnerships to address some of the most pressing health challenges facing Africa and strengthen an innovative health partnership based on south-south cooperation. This year’s roundtable is the first to take place on the African continent. It will focus on promoting sustainable health solutions that meet the needs and priorities of African countries and draw on China’s unique expertise.

Officials will engage in two days of sessions aimed at determining how China and African countries can jointly tackle critical issues such as AIDS, malaria, schistosomiasis, reproductive health, access to lifesaving vaccines and non-communicable diseases. These health issues disproportionately affect African countries and have also been major health challenges for China. At the roundtable, China’s Director General of the National Health and Family Planning Commission will join Health Ministers from Botswana and Ghana; leaders from the African Union; representatives from the United Nations and non-governmental organizations; and entrepreneurs and business owners from China and Africa.

“Indeed, China and Africa have a long history of collaborating on health, built on shared challenges, experiences and addressing similar issues,” said Hon. Rev. Dr. John G. N. Seakgosing, Botswana’s Minister of Health. “China has a unique role in supporting African health progress. And with this roundtable, we look forward to deepening our partnership to benefit the health of our citizens.”

This roundtable comes as China and Africa mark the 50th anniversary of providing medical teams to Africa, with China also supporting African health personnel, infrastructure, malaria control and other programs such as scholarships for training health experts. At this year’s roundtable, officials will discuss how to shape health cooperation between China and Africa and help achieve long-term, sustainable gains, such as strengthening health systems and addressing the shortage of healthcare workers.

“Africa’s future is closely linked with our own and improving health is a critical building block towards a common prosperity,” said Dr. Ren Minghui, Director General of the Department of International Cooperation at China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission. “African countries have made tremendous gains to improve the health of their citizens. With China and Africa working hand-in-hand on health, we can have even greater impact.”

A major theme of the roundtable is how African and Chinese officials can create win-win scenarios that will benefit all partners. Much of China’s health assistance invests in expanding African capacity, which can help strengthen the continent’s self-sufficiency and economic development. China has a unique role in supporting Africa’s health progress, drawing from its investments in health research and development and its experience improving the health of its own citizens, such as its current health reform effort, which is the largest expansion of healthcare coverage in history.

When other countries send weapons to Africa, China sends water. China is gaining reputation for helping African countries develop

Roundtable participants will discuss how African countries can best work with Chinese scientists and pharmaceutical manufacturers to increase access to high-quality, low-cost health technologies, while ensuring products are safe and meet international quality standards. Participants will also explore how China can help support Africa’s local production of health products. At the same time, African leaders will share expertise on areas where China can learn from Africa, such as around AIDS prevention and treatment, to help improve China’s efforts at home. Africa has been very successful in scaling up HIV treatment as well as prevention of mother-to-child transmission programs.

“South-South cooperation facilitates optimization of resources, both human and material. This creates opportunities to share knowledge and experience, which contributes to sustainable health solutions,” said H.E. Dr. Mustapha Sidiki Kaloko, Commissioner of Social Affairs of the African Union. “China-Africa health partnership is based on a sense of shared responsibility and global solidarity in responding to health challenges.”

The roundtable comes as China and other emerging economies are bringing new resources and approaches to improve the health of people around the world. “The global health landscape is changing, with more partners than ever joining these efforts,” said Dr. Luiz Loures, Deputy Executive Director of Programme of UNAIDS. “The AIDS response and other experiences paved the way for transformative progress on health and can help China and Africa engage on a whole new level and innovate on a broad range of health issues.”

The roundtable sessions will be guided by discussion papers that draw on extensive research and discussion developed by the China-Africa Health Cooperation Taskforce, comprised of members of the Chinese government and leading technical institutions, with the support of international partners including the World Health Organization, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UNAIDS, PATH, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Global Health Strategies Initiatives (GHSi) and other organizations.

Facts you don't want to miss

The papers propose pilot projects for China-Africa collaboration in areas such as strengthening laboratory systems; establishing national control systems for malaria and schistosomiasis; transferring ARV drug manufacturing technology and technical support for local production; training African health personnel; and sharing China’s expertise in cold chain management and surveillance systems to boost immunization coverage. Sessions will also address ways to ensure transparency in these efforts and to guarantee high quality products.

“China has tremendous potential to support Africa’s long-term development by leveraging innovation. The roundtable is an opportunity to define a path for China and Africa to make a positive impact together on health,” said Dr. Ray Yip, Director of the China Program of the Gates Foundation.
One aim of the roundtable is to develop joint recommendations that could lay the groundwork for a long-term strategic plan for China-Africa health cooperation, which could be considered at the Ministerial Forum of China-Africa Health Development, part of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), which will take place in August in Beijing.

This year’s roundtable is hosted by the Botswana Ministry of Health, the China Chamber of Commerce of the Ministry of Commerce and the Institute for Global Health of Peking University. The roundtable series, organized by the Institute for Global Health and the China Institute of International Studies, began in 2009 as part of a China-led initiative to evaluate and improve its foreign assistance.

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Le Canada appuie l’amélioration du climat des affaires au profit de l’agriculture en Afrique

Posted on 13 May 2013 by Africa Business

LE CAP, Afrique du Sud, 10 mai 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ Le ministre de la Coopération internationale, l’honorable Julian Fantino, a participé au Forum économique mondial (en anglais) sur l’Afrique, au forum sur l’investissement en Afrique (Grow Africa Investment Forum) et à la rencontre du conseil des dirigeants de la Nouvelle Alliance pour la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition du G8, qui se tiennent au Cap, en Afrique du Sud. Sa présence a pour but de promouvoir le recours aux partenariats avec le secteur privé pour trouver des solutions novatrices aux défis en matière de développement agricole durable, de sécurité alimentaire et de nutrition en Afrique.

 

« Le Canada soutient depuis fort longtemps la sécurité alimentaire et le développement agricole durable partout en Afrique, et il est conscient du rôle clé que joue le secteur privé dans le domaine de l’agriculture, a déclaré le ministre Fantino. L’un des grands objectifs du Canada en Afrique est d’établir de nouveaux partenariats avec le secteur privé en vue de favoriser la transformation agricole, d’améliorer la nutrition et d’encourager une croissance économique durable dont profiteront les populations du continent tout entier. »

 

Le Canada se réjouit à l’idée que le secteur privé joue un plus grand rôle dans l’accroissement de la sécurité alimentaire, et complète de ce fait le rôle fondamental du secteur public. Il travaille activement au sein de la Nouvelle Alliance pour la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition, lancée par le G8 en 2012, et appuie fermement le forum sur l’investissement en Afrique et le Forum économique mondial sur l’Afrique, qui ont pour objet d’accélérer la diversification économique, de développer les infrastructures stratégiques ainsi que de libérer le potentiel de l’Afrique en vue de favoriser l’apparition de nouveaux partenariats entre les gouvernements africains et le secteur privé, pour stimuler l’investissement.

 

Le Canada demeure résolu à apporter son soutien aux Africains pour qu’ils puissent disposer d’aliments sains et nutritifs, en quantité suffisante. L’agriculture est le moteur de la croissance économique durable dans de nombreux pays en développement. Les investissements dans ce secteur permettent de créer des emplois, qui augmentent la sécurité alimentaire et les revenus des ménages, deux éléments clés de l’élimination de la pauvreté. Un grand nombre des initiatives canadiennes visent à aider les petits exploitants agricoles, en particulier les femmes, à cultiver des produits agricoles nutritifs et à diversifier leurs récoltes.

 

Le Canada a à cœur le développement agricole durable, en particulier le renforcement de la sécurité alimentaire et de la résilience des populations vulnérables. Le Plan d’action économique de 2013 réitère l’engagement du Canada à l’égard des investissements d’aide au développement international dans les domaines de l’agriculture, de la sécurité alimentaire et de la nutrition. Le nouveau ministère des Affaires étrangères, du Commerce et du Développement continuera à assumer le mandat de réduction de la pauvreté et permettra d’apporter une aide plus efficace, plus transparente et mieux ciblée pour continuer à améliorer le sort des populations démunies à l’échelle de la planète.

 

SOURCE

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MTN Uganda adjusts Mobile Money Tariffs

Posted on 09 May 2013 by Africa Business

MTN Uganda has adjusted its Mobile Money tariffs slightly for the first time since the largely successful product was first launched four years ago.

MTN Uganda launched their Mobile Money service in early 2009 and has in the last four years made significant changes to how Ugandans are transacting in the New World, through paying for goods and services as well as sending and receiving money from and to anywhere in the country as well as Internationally.

“MTN strives to constantly improve our service delivery to our customers. Our New tariffs are guided by our understanding that we need to constantly improve and sustain the robustness and availability of our MTN Mobile Money services across the country.” said Ernst Fonternel, MTN Uganda Chief Marketing Officer.

Fonternel explained that the increase in tariffs is meant to enable the telecom company to improve service delivery to their customers, in line with the current market and economic dynamics in Uganda.

“While the cumulative inflation since early 2009 to date is well in excess of 50%, MTN has never adjusted its tariffs to cater for inflationary and/or other economic pressures. We are adjusting our tariffs slightly, relative to the benefits associated with Mobile Money to ensure we have a sustainable business model for the future.” Fonternel said.

The new rates which took effect 8th May 2013 will affect sending money to both registered and non-registered Mobile Money users, withdrawing Money from an MTN Mobile Money agent, paying bills using the MTN Mobile Money Pay Bill service, paying bills using the MTN Mobile Money Goods & Services menu and Sending Bulk Mobile Money payments.

“The increase in tariffs will facilitate an increase in our Agent Network commissions to ensure that our agents get better rewards on high value transactions and as an incentive to hold adequate float to ensure that customers have the best distribution network available. The change in tariffs ensures that we can continue to invest into our platform bringing new innovative and relevant services to Uganda while expanding our extensive distribution network.” Fonternel added.

Fonternel explained that despite the changes, some tariffs will not be affected. “You can still buy airtime and buy Mobile Money (Deposit) free of charge. Also Registering for Mobile Money, checking your account balance and changing your PIN number are still free of charge.”

Transaction limits have stayed the same, with minimum account balance at 0/- and the minimum transaction limit at 500/-. The maximum account balance remains 5,000,000/- and the maximum daily transaction limit remains 4,000,000/-.

Since the product was first launched four years ago, MTN Mobile Money has grown significantly with monthly transactions now in excess of 27 million with a Mobile Money Base of more than 4 million customers.

It has also grown from a basic service enabling sending and receiving money, and buying airtime, to a convenient service that enables a lot more, such as paying school fees, trade and commerce, bill payments, and a host of other payments. Today, you can literally do anything with mobile money from the comfort of your office or home.

At a recent GSM Mobile Money adoption survey, MTN Mobile Money was declared the second fastest growing mobile money service in the world.

This year and going forward, MTN plans to increase the person to business and business to person services on the platform to enable more commerce to be done over the service.

The complete list of new tariffs is readily available at any MTN shop or service center as well as on www.mtn.co.ug/MobileMoneyRates.

For any further inquiries or assistance call the MTN Mobile Money helpline on 122, the General MTN Helpline on 123, or visit a nearby MTN Service Centre or MTN Mobile Money agent.

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

MasterCard to Power Nigerian Identity Card Program

Posted on 08 May 2013 by Africa Business

13 Million Cards to be issued first, in largest card rollout of its kind in Africa


About MasterCard

MasterCard (NYSE: MA) (http://www.mastercard.com) is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter @MasterCardNews (https://twitter.com/#!/MasterCardNews), join the discussion on the Cashless Conversations Blog (http://newsroom.mastercard.com/blog) and subscribe (http://newsroom.mastercard.com/subscribe) for the latest news (http://newsroom.mastercard.com).

About NIMC

The National Identity Management Commission (NIMC) was established by the NIMC Act No.23, 2007 as the primary legal, regulatory and institutional mechanism for implementing a reliable and sustainable national identity management system that will enable Nigerian citizens and legal residents assert their identity. The Act mandates the NIMC to create, own, operate and manage a national identity database, issue national identification numbers to registered individuals, provide identity authentication and verification services, issue multipurpose smartcards, integrate identity databases across government agencies and foster the orderly development of the identity sector in Nigeria. The Act also empowered the NIMC to collaborate with any public and or private sector organization to realize its objectives.

About Unified Payments

Unified Payments is owned by a consortium of Nigerian Banks. Our core businesses comprise Processing, Merchant Acquiring, Switching, Payment Terminal Services and provision of Value Added Services & Solutions. Unified Payments pioneered the issuance and acceptance of EMV Chip + PIN cards in Nigeria, leading to reduction of ATM fraud in Nigeria by over 95%. The company enabled Nigerian banks and merchants for the first time ever to accept foreign cards at ATMs and Points of Sale Terminals, and also pioneered the issuance of Naira cards that are globally accepted.

About Access Bank

Access Bank Plc (http://www.accessbankplc.com) is a full service commercial Bank operating through a network of over 300 branches and service outlets located in major centres across Nigeria, Sub Saharan Africa and the United Kingdom. Listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange, the Bank has over 800,000 shareholders and has enjoyed what is arguably Africa’s most successful banking growth trajectory in the last ten years ranking amongst Africa’s top 20 banks by total assets and capital in 2011. As part of its continued growth strategy, Access Bank has made sustainable business core to all its operations. The Bank strives to deliver sustainable economic growth that is profitable, environmentally responsible and socially relevant.


CAPE-TOWN, South-Africa, May 8, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ The Nigerian National Identity Management Commission (NIMC) (http://www.nimc.gov.ng) and MasterCard (http://www.mastercard.com) today announced at the World Economic Forum on Africa the roll-out of 13 million MasterCard-branded National Identity Smart Cards (http://www.nimc.gov.ng/reports/id_card_policy.pdf) with electronic payment capability as a pilot program. The National Identity Smart Card is the Card Scheme under the recently deployed National Identity Management System (NIMS). This program is the largest roll-out of a formal electronic payment solution in the country and the broadest financial inclusion initiative of its kind on the African continent.

The Nigerian National Identity Management Commission (NIMC) will be issuing MasterCard-branded National Identity Smart Cards with electronic payment capability. This program is the largest roll-out of a formal electronic payment solution in the country and the broadest financial inclusion initiative of its kind on the African continent.

 

Earlier this year Ajay Banga commended the Finance Minister of Nigeria Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala and the Central Bank Governor Sanusi Lamido on the Cashless Nigeria initiative and discussed MasterCard’s commitment to supporting a widespread national identification program in the country.

 

 

Infographic – Navigating the Next Cashless Continent: http://newsroom.mastercard.com/press-releases/mastercard-to-power-nigerian-identity-card-program/mastercard_africa_infographic_01-13_v9/

As part of the program, in its first phase, Nigerians 16 years and older, and all residents in the country for more than two years, will get the new multipurpose identity card which has 13 applications including MasterCard’s prepaid payment technology that will provide cardholders with the safety, convenience and reliability of electronic payments. This will have a significant and positive impact on the lives of these Nigerians who have not previously had access to financial services.

The Project will have Access Bank Plc as the pilot issuer bank for the cards and Unified Payment Services Limited (Unified Payments) as the payment processor. Other issuing banks will include United Bank for Africa, Union Bank, Zenith, Skye Bank, Unity Bank, Stanbic, and First Bank.

The announcement was witnessed by Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Minister of Finance and Coordinating Minister for the Economy in Nigeria, who stressed the importance of the National Identity Smart Card Scheme in moving Nigeria to an electronic platform. This program is good practice for us to bring all the citizens on a common platform for interacting with the various government agencies and for transacting electronically. We will implement this initiative in a collaborative manner between the public and private sectors, to achieve its full potential of inclusive citizenship and more effective governance,” she said.

“Today’s announcement is the first phase of an unprecedented project in terms of scale and scope for Nigeria,” said Michael Miebach, President, Middle East and Africa, MasterCard. “MasterCard has been a firm supporter of the Central Bank of Nigeria’s (CBN) (http://www.cenbank.org) Cashless Policy (http://www.cenbank.org/cashless) as we share a vision of a world beyond cash. From the program’s inception, we have provided the Federal Government of Nigeria with global insights and best practices on how electronic payments can enable economic growth and create a more financially inclusive economy”.

Chris ‘E Onyemenam, the Director General and Chief Executive of the National Identity Management Commission, said “We have chosen MasterCard to be the payment technology provider for the initial rollout of the National Identity Smart Card project because the Company has shown a commitment to furthering financial inclusion through the reduction of cash in the Nigerian economy.” He added “MasterCard has pioneered large scale card schemes that combine biometric functionality with electronic payments and we want to capitalize on their experience in this field to make our program rollout a sustainable success for the country and for the continent.”

“Access Bank’s involvement in this project is testament to our ongoing efforts to expand financial inclusion in Nigeria,” said Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, CEO of Access Bank. “The new identity card will revolutionize the Nigerian economic landscape, breaking down one of the most significant barriers to financial inclusion – proof of identity, while simultaneously providing Nigerians with a world class payment solution”.

“Unified Payments is the foremost transaction processor and pioneer of EMV processing and acquiring in Nigeria, owned by leading Nigerian banks. We will use our expertise and experience to guarantee the success of the project and ensure that the data of Nigerians are protected. We look forward to working with other partners in delivering value to all stakeholders”, said Agada Apochi, Managing Director and CEO, Unified Payments.

The new National Identity Smart Card will incorporate the unique National Identification Numbers (NIN) of duly registered persons in the country. The enrollment process involves the recording of an individual’s demographic data and biometric data (capture of 10 fingerprints, facial picture and digital signature) that are used to authenticate the cardholder and eliminate fraud and embezzlement. The resultant National Identity Database will provide the platform for several other value propositions of the NIMC including identity authentication and verification.

Thanks to the unique and unambiguous identification of individuals under the NIMS, other identification card schemes like the Driver’s License, Voters Registration, Health Insurance, Tax, SIM and the National Pension Commission (PENCOM) will benefit and can all be integrated, using the NIN, into the multi-function Card Scheme of the NIMS. When fully utilizing the card as a prepaid payment tool, the cardholder can deposit funds on the card, receive social benefits, pay for goods and services at any of the 35 million MasterCard acceptance locations globally, withdraw cash from all ATMs that accept MasterCard, or engage in many other financial transactions that are facilitated by electronic payments. All in a secure and convenient environment enabled by the EMV Chip and Pin standard.

Upon completion of the National ID registration process, NIMC aims to introduce more than 100 million cards to Nigeria’s 167 million (http://www.tradingeconomics.com/nigeria/population) citizens.

 

SOURCE

MasterCard Worldwide

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

La part africaine des investissements directs à l’étranger (IDE) mondiaux augmente depuis les cinq dernières années – Africa Attractiveness Survey

Posted on 06 May 2013 by Africa Business

JOHANNESBURG, Afrique du Sud, 6 mai 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/

- Part mondiale des IDE en hausse, mais baisse du nombre de projets en 2012

-    Croissance africaine prévue à 4 % en 2013 et 4,6 % en 2014

La part africaine des investissements directs à l’étranger (IDE) mondiaux a augmenté au cours des cinq dernières années, reflétant l’intérêt croissant des investisseurs étrangers, selon la troisième étude Africa Attractiveness Survey d’Ernst & Young (http://www.ey.com/za), parue aujourd’hui.

Download the presentation: http://www.apo-mail.org/Africa_attractiveness_2013_Low_Res

Ce rapport associe une analyse des investissements internationaux en Afrique au cours des cinq dernières années à une enquête menée en 2013 auprès de plus de 500 chefs d’entreprises à propos de leur opinion sur le potentiel du marché africain. Les dernières données montrent que malgré une baisse du nombre de projets, de 867 en 2011 à 764 en 2012 (ce qui correspond à la tendance mondiale), ce nombre reste nettement supérieur à ceux qui ont précédé le pic de 2008. La part mondiale des IDE dans le continent est également passée de 3,2 % en 2007 à 5,6     % en 2012.

Mark Otty, Managing Partner EMEIA chez Ernst & Young, commente : « Un processus de démocratisation qui s’enracine dans la plus grande partie du continent ; des améliorations constantes à l’environnement commerciale, une croissance exponentielle du commerce et de l’investissement ainsi que des améliorations substantielles dans la qualité de la vie humaine ont offert une plateforme à la croissance économique qu’un grand nombre d’économies africaines ont connu au cours de la dernière décennie. »

Malgré l’impact de la situation économique mondiale actuelle, la taille de l’économie africaine a plus que triplé depuis 2000. Les perspectives semblent aussi positives, avec la région dans sa globalité qui devrait connaître une croissance de 4 % en 2013 et de 4,6 % en 2014. Plusieurs économies africaines devraient conserver certaines des croissances les plus rapides au monde dans un avenir proche.

86 % des répondants qui ont une présence établie sur le continent pensent que l’attractivité de l’Afrique en tant que lieu pour faire des affaires continuera à augmenter. Ils ont classé l’Afrique seconde destination d’investissement la plus attractive après l’Asie.

Des investissements croissants des marchés émergents

L’investissement des pays développés dans des projets d’IDE a chuté de 20 %. Bien que les projets d’IDE du Royaume-Uni aient augmenté (de 9 % par année), ceux des États-Unis et de la France (les deux autres grands marchés développés investisseurs en Afrique) ont considérablement diminué. En revanche, l’investissement des marchés émergents en Afrique a encore augmenté en 2012, poursuivant la tendance des trois dernières années.

Depuis 2007, les projets d’IDE des marchés émergents en Afrique ont augmenté à un taux cumulé conséquent de plus de 21 %. En comparaison, l’investissement des marchés développés n’a augmenté que de 8 %. Les plus grands contributeurs des marchés émergents sont l’Inde (237), l’Afrique du Sud (235), les EAU (210), la Chine (152), le Kenya (113), le Nigeria (78), l’Arabie Saoudite (56) et la Corée du Sud (57), tous classés parmi les 20 plus grands investisseurs sur cette période.

L’investissement intra-africain a été particulièrement impressionnant pendant cette même période, avec un taux de croissance cumulé de 33 %. L’Afrique du Sud a été en première ligne de la croissance du commerce intra-africain et des investissements accrus des marchés émergents (le plus grand investisseur en projets d’IDE hors d’Afrique du Sud). Le Kenya et le Nigeria ont également fortement investi mais on prévoit que d’autres, à l’instar de l’Angola, avec un fonds souverain de 5 milliards de dollars, deviendront des investisseurs de plus en plus présents sur le continent au cours des prochaines années.

Ajen Sita, Managing Partner Afrique chez Ernst & Young, explique : « Il y a une confiance et un optimisme croissant chez les Africains eux-mêmes au sujet des progrès et de l’avenir du continent. »

Un important changement s’est également produit dans l’investissement sur le continent ces dernières années, tant en termes de marchés de destination que de secteurs. Tandis que l’investissement en Afrique du Nord a largement stagné, les projets d’IDE en Afrique sub-saharienne ont augmenté à un taux de croissance cumulé de 22 % depuis 2007. Parmi les pays « stars » attirant un nombre croissant de projets, on compte le Ghana, le Nigeria, le Kenya, la Tanzanie, la Zambie, le Mozambique, l’île Maurice et l’Afrique du Sud.

Perception contre réalité

Notre édition 2013 d’Africa Attractiveness Survey montre des progrès en termes de perception des investisseurs depuis la première édition de 2011. La majorité des répondants a une vision positive des progrès réalisés et des perspectives pour l’Afrique. L’Afrique a également gagné du terrain par rapport aux autres régions du monde. En 2011, l’Afrique était seulement classée au-dessus de deux autres régions, tandis que cette année, elle surclasse cinq autres régions (les anciens États soviétiques, l’Europe de l’Est, l’Europe de l’Ouest, le Moyen-Orient et l’Amérique centrale).

Cependant, il reste toujours un fossé de perceptions entre les répondants qui opèrent déjà en Afrique et ceux qui n’ont pas encore investi dans le continent. Ceux qui ont une activité établie en Afrique sont extrêmement positifs. Ils comprennent les risques opérationnels réels plutôt que ceux perçus, connaissent les progrès réalisés et voient les opportunités de croissance future. 86 % de ces chefs d’entreprise pensent que l’attractivité de l’Afrique en tant que lieu où faire des affaires continuera à augmenter, et ils classent l’Afrique seconde destination d’investissement la plus attractive au monde après l’Asie.

En revanche, ceux qui ne sont pas présents en Afrique sont bien plus négatifs en ce qui concerne les progrès et les prospects de l’Afrique. Seuls 47 % de ces répondants pensent que l’attractivité de l’Afrique augmentera dans les trois prochaines années, et ils classent l’Afrique destination d’investissement la moins attractive au monde.

Les deux défis fondamentaux qui existent pour ceux qui sont déjà présents ou qui cherchent à investir en Afrique sont les infrastructures de transport et de logistique, ainsi que la corruption et les pots-de-vin. Toutefois, des mesures sont prises sur ces deux plans pour dissiper les craintes des investisseurs.

Les manques d’infrastructures, particulièrement en matière de logistique et d’électricité, sont constamment cités comme plus gros problèmes par ceux qui font des affaires en Afrique. Au niveau macro-économique également, la croissance africaine sera forcément limitée tant que le déficit d’infrastructure ne sera pas comblé. Le côté positif de ce problème, cependant, est qu’une croissance forte a lieu malgré ces contraintes infrastructurelles. Cela augure un potentiel pour non seulement maintenir, mais accélérer la croissance lorsque ce manque sera réduit. Nos analyses indiquent qu’en 2012 il y avait plus de 800 projets d’infrastructure actifs dans différents secteurs en Afrique, avec une valeur combinée dépassant les 700 milliards de dollars. La grande majorité des projets d’infrastructure sont liés à l’électricité (37 %) et aux transports (41 %).

S’éloigner des industries extractives

En raison de la nature volatile des prix des matières premières, une sur-dépendance à quelques secteurs clés soulève des questions sur la pérennisation de la croissance. Malgré les perceptions contraires, moins d’un tiers de la croissance africaine provient de ressources naturelles.

La tendance à la diversification se poursuit, avec une emphase toujours plus grande sur les services, la fabrication et les activités liées aux infrastructures. En 2007, les industries extractives représentaient 8 % des projets d’IDE et 26 % des capitaux investis en Afrique ; en 2012, elles représentaient 2 % des projets et 12 % du capital. En comparaison, les services comptaient pour 70 % des projets en 2012 (contre 45 % en 2007), et les activités de fabrication comptaient pour 43 % du capital investi en 2012 (contre 22 % en 2007).

Le secteur minier et des métaux est toujours perçu par les répondants à l’enquête comme celui présentant le plus grand potentiel de croissance en Afrique, mais le nombre de répondants qui pensent cela (26 %) a diminué, puisqu’il était de 38 % en 2012 et de 44 % en 2011. En revanche, l’intérêt pour les projets d’infrastructure en Afrique augmente nettement, avec 21 % des répondants les identifiant comme un secteur de croissance contre 14 % l’année dernière et seulement 4 % en 2011. Les autres secteurs où un changement notable s’est produit sont les technologies de l’information et de la communication (14 %, contre 8 % l’année dernière), les services financiers (13 %, contre 6 % l’an dernier), et l’éducation (qui est partie de pratiquement rien pour arriver à 10 % cette année).

M. Otty commente : « Ces perceptions changeantes de l’attractivité relative des secteurs en Afrique reflètent l’évolution des fondamentaux de nombreuses économies africaines : la diversification à la fois des sources de croissance (par exemple, la contribution croissante des services et une classe de consommateurs croissante), et des IDE entrant dans ces économies. »

L’Afrique du Sud plus attractive pour les investisseurs étrangers, suivie par d’autres pays en grande forme

La grande majorité des répondants considère l’Afrique du Sud comme le pays africain le plus attractif pour faire des affaires : 41 % de tous les répondants ont placé l’Afrique du Sud en première place, et 61 % dans leur top 3. Les principales raisons de la popularité de l’Afrique du Sud semblent être ses infrastructures relativement bien développées, un environnement politique stable et un marché intérieur relativement important. Les pays suivants en ordre de popularité sont le Maroc (20 % le plaçant dans leur top 3, et 8 % en première place), le Nigeria (également 20 % dans le top 3, et 6 % à la première place), l’Égypte (15 % dans le top 3 et 5 % en première place) et le Kenya (15 % dans les trois premiers et 4 % à la première place). En général, ces classements correspondent aux centres régionaux émergents pour les affaires dans différentes régions d’Afrique.

Se tourner vers l’avenir

M. Sita conclut : « Avec un contexte de plus en plus solide de réformes économiques, politiques et sociales, associés à des taux de croissance résilients, nous sommes convaincus que le continent dans son ensemble est sur une trajectoire de croissance durable. Cette direction, plutôt que la destination actuelle, est ce qui compte le plus.

Une masse cruciale d’économies africaines continuera ce parcours. Malgré le fait qu’il y aura forcément des obstacles sur la route, il est fort probable que plusieurs de ces économies suivront le même développement que certains des marchés asiatiques et autres marchés à croissance rapide au cours des 30 dernières années. D’ici les années 2040, nous sommes sûrs que des pays tels que le Nigeria, le Ghana, l’Angola, l’Égypte, l’Éthiopie et l’Afrique du Sud seront considérés comme des moteurs de croissance de l’économie mondiale. »

 

SOURCE

Ernst & Young

Bookmark and Share

Comments (0)

AfricaBusiness.com Newsletter

* required

*





AfricaBusiness.com Newsletter



Business in UAE
Copyright © 2009 - 2016. African Business Environment. All Rights Reserved. AfricaBusiness.com Business Magazine