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GBOT, The First Exchange in Africa, to Successfully Launch Contracts for Difference (CFDs)

Posted on 07 May 2013 by Africa Business

 

GBOT is the 1st exchange in Africa and 2nd in the world to introduce CFDs

About GBOT (http://www.gbot.mu)

Global Board of Trade Ltd. (GBOT) (http://www.gbot.mu) is the first international multi-asset bourse from Mauritius that offers participants, from across the globe, access to a tech centric market that is regulated, liquid and transparent with efficient clearing and settlement systems. GBOT’s state of the art infrastructure provides a world class platform for risk management, trading and investment on global and African products.

The bourse is licensed and regulated by Financial Services Commission (FSC), Mauritius to offer trading in commodity derivatives, currency derivatives, equity cash and equity derivatives. The current product offering of the bourse includes commodity derivatives, currency derivatives and CFDs.

GBOT is promoted by the Financial Technologies Group (http://www.ftindia.com), a global leader in setting up and operating tech-centric next generation exchanges in the emerging but fast growing economies from Africa to Asia and Middle East to South-East Asia.

 

EBENE, Mauritius, May 7, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/

•    GBOT has successfully launched CFDs on 18th April 2013

•    GBOT is the 1st exchange in Africa and 2nd in the world to introduce CFDs

•    GBOT has introduced four CFD contracts on Gold, WTI (Crude Oil), EUR/USD and GBP/USD

•    Individuals and organizations can trade with as low as USD 20

Global Board of Trade (http://www.gbot.mu), the first international multiasset bourse from Mauritius has successfully launched Contracts for Difference (CFDs). The launch of CFDs on GBOT makes it the 1st exchange in Africa and 2nd in the world to introduce CFDs.


GBOT CFDs will replicate the spot price performance of underlying assets and give traders and investors easy and seamless exposure to USD denominated currencies, commodities, equities and indices. The introductory CFD contracts on GBOT will include GOLD (1 Troy Ounce), WTI Crude Oil (10 Barrels), EUR/USD (1000 Euro) and GBP/USD (1000 GBP). The small sized products are launched with the objective of taking markets to the masses by allowing the investor to trade with as low as USD 20. As the market matures, GBOT will scale up its operations along with its CFD product portfolio to suit the preferences of its members and aid their business expansion.

By definition, Contract for Difference (CFD) means a standardized derivative traded on GBOT where a buyer and a seller agree to exchange the difference in value of a particular underlying between the time when the Contract is opened and when it is closed. CFDs are leveraged instruments that allow traders to hold large positions on commodities, currencies, equities and indices with a small margin deposit. Traders can take advantage of both rising and falling markets. The standardized GBOT CFD contracts will offer enhanced transparency, no counterparty risk, high return potential, low entry threshold and no levy of overnight rollover and open interest charges.

Ms. Clairette Ah-Hen, Chief Executive of Financial Services Commission, Mauritius said: “The launching of CFDs represents yet another milestone in our financial services landscape as it will enable both local and overseas investors, be it individual or institutional, to diversify further their investments. CFDs may bring more value-addition by enabling investors to take advantage of both rising and falling share prices. Small investors too will be able to trade on CFDs, given the low capital entry requirement. The overall result will be enhanced liquidity and buoyancy in the market, thereby attracting more international buyers and improving the visibility of our jurisdiction.”

Mr. Jignesh Shah, Chairman & Managing Director of Financial Technologies Group, India and Vice-Chairman of Global Board of Trade, said: “The launch of CFDs on GBOT reinstates our vision of taking Wall Street to the Man on Street. We have been successfully implementing our model of organized markets for masses from Asia to Middle-East and are committed to lead the development of African Financial Markets with GBOT.”

Commenting on the launch of CFDs, Mr. Rinsy Ansalam, MD & CEO of GBOT, said: “A key ingredient towards a vibrant capital is product innovation and the launch of CFDs is yet another initiative of GBOT that will democratize markets and allow the smallest investor to participate. The target market range of this segment includes fund houses, traders, students, house wives and people with no finance background. As a CFD pre-launch initiative, GBOT has conducted over 50 workshops to educate over 500 participants on its features and advantages. Through education, we are simplifying financial markets for masses.”

 

 

SOURCE

Global Board of Trade Ltd. (GBOT)

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Carlson Rezidor announces the Radisson Blu Hotel, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

Posted on 22 April 2013 by Africa Business

The Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group – born in early 2012 – is one of the world’s largest and most dynamic hotel groups. The portfolio of the Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group includes more than 1,300 hotels, a global footprint spanning 80 countries, a powerful set of global brands (Radisson Blu, Radisson®, Country Inns & Suites by CarlsonSM, Park Inn by Radisson, Hotel Missoni and Park Plaza®). In most of the group’s hotels, guests can benefit from the loyalty program Club Carlson, one of the most rewarding loyalty programs in the world. The Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group and its brands employ more than 80,000 people. The Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group is headquartered in Minneapolis, USA, and Brussels, Belgium. http://www.carlsonrezidor.com; http://www.rezidor.com

 

The Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group, one of the fastest growing hotel companies worldwide, announces their 49th hotel deal in Africa: The Radisson Blu Hotel, Port Harcourt Olympia in Nigeria is scheduled to open in 2016 and will add a further 206 rooms to Rezidor’s portfolio of 11,000 rooms on the continent.

“This announcement brings the total number to eight hotels which the Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group operates and has under development in Nigeria. The success of the Radisson Blu Lagos illustrates the increasingly high demand for world class hospitality in Africa’s second largest economy,” comments Andrew McLachlan, Vice President Business Development Africa & Indian Ocean Islands.

The new Radisson Blu Hotel, Port Harcourt Olympia complements the existing Radisson Blu Anchorage Hotel in Lagos; the up and coming Radisson Blu Hotel in Abuja, and the Park Inn properties by Radisson in Lagos, Apapa, Ikeja, Abeoukuta and Abuja. Nigeria is a key development market for Rezidor – the group will be the first international operator to provide world-class hotel standards in the three major financial hubs of Lagos, Abuja and Port Harcourt”, McLachlan adds.

Opposite the Port Harcourt Club 1928 Golf course and offering spectacular views over the fairways and greens, the Radisson Blu hotel site is located in the southern part of the city in the less congested old Government Reserve Area. Besides 206 guest rooms all featuring Radisson Blu signature services such as free high speed internet access, the hotel will also offer an all-day dining restaurant, a specialty restaurant & bar, and the largest conference facilities within the Niger Delta, with 2,100 square metres of conference and meeting space. Additionally there will be a gym, spa, outdoor swimming pool, business centre and rooftop bar & terrace.


Port Harcourt is the economic hub of the Niger Delta and the capital of Rivers State, one of Nigeria’s richest states due its large crude oil and natural gas deposits. It is home to major oil companies, banking institutions and government agencies. Hotel room supply in the city has not grown for several years, and the Radisson Blu business and conference hotel will benefit from being the most modern internationally branded property in the city.

With no significant increase in hotel room supply in Port Harcourt since 2006, we feel the time is ripe to establish a Radisson Blu in Port Harcourt for the business traveler,” remarks McLachlan, “Carlson Rezidor has the largest pipeline of rooms under development in sub-Saharan Africa. This signing further strengthens our leading position and underlines the importance Nigeria has for our group”.

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Why has Africa been so important for Global Pacific & Partners ?

Posted on 06 April 2013 by Thandisizwe Mgudlwa

Dr Duncan Clarke,
CEO of Global Pacific & Partners

What is the nature of your organisation?

We are a private advisory group, built on research and knowledge, with a suite of annual strategy briefings and landmark management conferences in world oil and gas with focus on Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East, with thirty years-plus in the upstream industry, whilst we equally hold extensive database on world oil/gas and on the economics of Africa, on which we have been author for widely-acclaimed books (Africa: Crude Continent, and Africa’s Future- as well as a TV/Film Documentary made on Africa’s oil and gas. So we are diversified but highly focused and we have pioneered many facets within the world industry including dedicated and gratis Newsletters across the world.

How do you see your role?

Our firm has been active in building relationships in oil and gas between companies and Governments and National oil Companies across Continents over many years, and we undertake Roadshows as well as assist Private Clients in advisory practice whilst our renown PetroAfricanus Club has been active in Africa for over a decade. So in a sense we facilitated acreage and asset marketing and strategies, and high-level management interfaces across the corporate/state oil world.

How long have you been with Global Pacific & Partners, and where did it all begin?

I am the founder of the firm which began in its inception and origins in the late 1970s, whilst in the last two decades Babette van Gessel (Senior Partner) has been involved with our business in all spheres, and acts now as Deputy-CEO. Our origins trace back to Geneve and research ventures and joint ventures begun there, and our Conference suite dates from 1991 (our landmark Africa Upstream since 1994) whilst we have undertaken 22 years in the sphere of Strategy Briefings which are conducted worldwide.

What conferences are taking place this year and where will your first conference be?

We have a well-established conference suite – including on Western Africa, Eastern Africa, North Africa-Mediterranean-MidEast, and Africa Oil Week (24-29th November 2013) as well as on Asia and Latin America, for which details can be found on www.petro21.com

Why is Western Africa so hot right now and what can delegates expect from the 19th Western Africa Oil, Gas & Energy conference?

Our Conference in Windhoek, Namibia over 22-24th April showcases the potential in oil/gas and LNG from Morocco to South Africa and including the littoral states, whiles it features 30 speakers, and covers highly prospective exploration zones, onshore and offshore frontiers, and deepwater potential across 25 countries – half of Africa nearly.

Why has Africa been so important for Global Pacific & Partners ?

Our origins lie in Africa, for both Senior Partners, and where we have been active in economics and related sphere for over four decades, whilst we have had an office in South Africa since 1994, and many of our Team come from Southern Africa, whilst we have been active with all countries on the Continent, visited around 47 countries on business to date, and been intimately involved in the oil and gas industry across the continent, plus we have extensively published on Africa and conducted numerous Advisory mandates in and on the Continent, and not just its hydrocarbon industry.

What will be some of the highlights for this year?

Probably the continued interest in Africa both in economic growth terms and in hydrocarbons, as well as in intensified competition and corporate new entries into frontiers, notably Eastern Africa.

In what ways, do you think Global Pacific & Partners is meeting the needs and expectations of delegates that attend these conferences?

Our feedback from a wide range of delegates, sponsors and exhibitors as well as speakers is excellent, and has earned us the reputation as the No-1 player of our type in Africa and the global upstream, with the greatest longevity of a cross-continent suite of meetings, the deepest and most important Conference portfolio on Africa within the oil and gas industry, and an unrivalled position in strategy briefings, roadshows and social networking for corporate/state clients across the world.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

Thank you for this invitation to be interviewed.

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IMF Executive Board Concludes 2012 Article IV Consultation with Nigeria

Posted on 29 March 2013 by Africa Business

ABUJA, Nigeria, March 29, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ On February 6, 2013, the Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) concluded the 2012 Article IV consultation with Nigeria.1

Background

Macroeconomic performance has been broadly positive over the past year. Real gross domestic product (GDP) growth is projected to have decelerated slightly to 6.3 percent, reflecting the effects of the nationwide strike in early 2012, floods in the fourth quarter of 2012, and continued security problems in the north. Annual inflation increased from 10.3 percent (end-of-period) in 2011 to 12.3 percent in 2012, owing mainly to the adjustment of administrative prices of fuel and electricity; large increases in import tariffs on rice and wheat; and the impact of floods in Q3. The external position has strengthened and international reserves rose from US$32.6 billion at end-2011 to US$44 billion at end-2012 (5½ months of prospective imports), driven by sustained high oil prices, stricter administration of the gasoline subsidy regime, and strong portfolio inflows.

The fiscal policy stance was tightened in 2012 and fiscal buffers are being rebuilt. The non-oil primary deficit of the consolidated government is estimated to have narrowed from about 36 percent of non-oil GDP in 2011 to 30.5 percent in 2012, mainly due to expenditure restraint. Monetary policy remained tight in 2012 in response to inflationary pressures. The central bank kept its policy rate unchanged during the year but raised the cash reserve requirement for banks from 8 percent to 12 percent and lowered allowable open foreign exchange position for banks. Financial soundness indicators point to continued improvements in the health of the banking system.

In 2013, growth is expected to recover to above 7 percent. Inflation is projected to decline below 10 percent, supported by the tight monetary policy stance and ongoing fiscal consolidation. The key downside risks are a large drop in world oil prices; and slow progress in building consensus around key fiscal reforms.

Executive Board Assessment

Executive Directors commended the authorities for prudent macroeconomic policies that have underpinned a strong economic performance in recent years. Looking ahead, Directors agreed that widespread unemployment and poverty remain key challenges for policymakers, and called for renewed efforts to make economic growth more broad-based and inclusive.

Directors supported the authorities’ strategy of consolidating the fiscal position while opening up policy space for needed investment in infrastructure and human capital. To this end, they underscored the need to improve tax administration, better prioritize public expenditure, strengthen public financial management, and improve the fiscal framework. In particular, they encouraged the authorities to reduce poorly-targeted fuel subsidies, adopt a rule to set the reference oil price in the budget, and fully operationalize the Sovereign Wealth Fund as soon as possible. Efforts to mobilize public support for these reforms should be intensified.

Directors considered the current tight monetary stance to be consistent with the authorities’ objective of reducing inflation to single digits. They also took note of the staff’s assessment that the exchange rate in real effective terms is broadly in line with fundamentals.

Directors commended the authorities’ success in restoring financial stability after the 2009 banking crisis. In light of this achievement, they recommended winding down the operations of the asset management company to curb moral hazard and fiscal risks. Directors welcomed the central bank’s commitment to address supervisory and regulatory gaps identified in the Financial Stability Assessment Update, particularly the need to strengthen cross-border supervision and the regime against money laundering and terrorism financing.

Directors concurred that wide-ranging reforms are key to make growth more inclusive. They agreed on the importance of supporting sectors with high employment potential, not through protectionist measures or tax incentives but rather with initiatives to improve governance, the investment climate, and competiveness. Directors welcomed reforms underway in the energy sector, and looked forward to an early passage of the Petroleum Industry Bill which would boost investment, government revenue, and fiscal transparency. They also encouraged the authorities to promote market-based access to credit for small- and medium-sized enterprises.

 

Nigeria: Selected Economic and Financial Indicators, 2009–2013

 

2009    2010    2011    2012    2013

Act.    Act.    Act.    Act.    Proj.

 

National income and prices

(Annual percentage change,

Unless otherwise specified)

Real GDP (at 1990 factor cost)

7.0    8.0    7.4    6.3    7.2

Oil and Gas GDP

0.5    5.2    -0.6    1.8    4.9

Non-oil GDP

8.3    8.5    8.9    7.1    7.5

Production of crude oil (million barrels per day)

2.2    2.5    2.4    2.4    2.5

Nominal GDP at market prices (trillions of naira)

25.1    34.4    37.8    43.1    48.1

Nominal non-oil GDP at factor cost (trillions of naira)

17.7    19.9    22.5    26.9    31.1

Nominal GDP per capita (US$)

1,110    1,465    1,522    1,637    1,686

Consumer price index (end of period)

12.5    13.7    10.8    12.7    8.2

Current account balance (percent of GDP) 1

8.3    5.9    3.6    4.7    4.0

Consolidated government operations

(Percent of GDP)

Total revenues and grants

17.8    20.0    29.9    28.1    26.7

Of which: oil and gas revenue

10.6    14.0    23.4    21.5    19.9

Total expenditure and net lending

27.3    26.9    29.4    27.1    26.7

Overall balance

-9.5    -6.9    0.5    0.9    0.0

Non-oil primary balance (percent of non-oil GDP)

-26.8    -34.3    -36.0    -30.4    -28.3

Excess Crude Account / SWF (US$ billions) 2

7.1    2.7    4.6    9.7    18.1

Money and credit

(Change in percent of broad money at the beginning of the period, unless otherwise specified)

Broad money

17.1    6.9    15.4    10.0    18.1

Net foreign assets

-10.9    -10.3    5.5    13.9    12.4

Net domestic assets

28.0    17.2    9.9    -3.9    5.7

Treasury bill rate (percent; end of period)

4.0    7.5    14.3    …    …

External sector

(Annual percentage change,

unless otherwise specified)

Exports of goods and services

-33.4    36.5    20.1    6.5    0.7

Imports of goods and services

-22.6    36.6    27.2    4.2    3.5

Terms of trade

-16.3    10.0    9.1    1.0    -2.1

Price of Nigerian oil (US$ per barrel)

61.8    79.0    109.0    110.1    104.4

Nominal effective exchange rate (end of period)

82.2    83.6    82.2    …    …

Real effective exchange rate (end of period)

110.0    120.7    119.4    …    …

Gross international reserves (US$ billions)

42.4    32.3    32.6    45.9    53.4

(Equivalent months of imports of goods and services)

7.4    4.5    4.3    5.9    6.4

 

Sources: Nigerian authorities; and IMF staff estimates and projections.

1Large errors and omissions in the balance of payments suggest that the current account surplus is overestimated by a significant (but unknown) amount.

2Consistent with federal, state, and local governments.

1 Under Article IV of the IMF’s Articles of Agreement, the IMF holds bilateral discussions with members, usually every year. A staff team visits the country, collects economic and financial information, and discusses with officials the country’s economic developments and policies. On return to headquarters, the staff prepares a report, which forms the basis for discussion by the Executive Board. At the conclusion of the discussion, the Managing Director, as Chairman of the Board, summarizes the views of Executive Directors, and this summary is transmitted to the country’s authorities. An explanation of any qualifiers used in summings up can be found here: http://www.imf.org/external/np/sec/misc/qualifiers.htm.

 

SOURCE

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

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African banks look to fill gap left in trade finance as Europe pulls back

Posted on 10 March 2013 by Africa Business

International commodity traders are turning to African banks to finance trade transactions as the global economic slowdown, Eurozone debt crisis and tougher capital requirements force international banks to pull back their lending in Africa.

Standard Bank’s Global Head of Structured Trade and Commodity Finance, Mr Craig Polkinghorne, says the pull-back forced on global banks is happening at a time when Africa’s trade continues to grow across a broad front of geographies and sectors.

Mr Polkinghorne says: “The scale of trade finance opportunity is substantial when considering that Africa’s exports alone grew to US $500-billion in 2012 from US $445-billion in 2011. It is something of a phenomenon that the general tightening of global credit continues to curtail availability of commodity trade finance from the traditionally dominant players, even as African countries ramp up trade relations with the fastest-growing economies.

Many international banks have reviewed their risk appetite and have withdrawn from, or limited their exposure to trade finance in Africa. Mr Polkinghorne says that a funding gap has consequently opened up, creating an opportunity for other players to fill that vacuum.

“This has created great opportunities for African banks to be more active in trade finance because they have strong balance sheets, the necessary capital and liquidity, and risk appetite. For domestic currency transactions they also have competitive funding costs compared to global counterparts,” he says.

“More importantly, as European and US demand has continued to decline, the liquidity from African banks has helped to deepen intra-African trade and increase trade flows between the continent and other emerging market regions.”

China is increasingly accounting for a significant portion of Africa’s trade compared to its trade with the rest of the world. Trade with China has grown from 10% of overall trade in 2008 to 18% in 2011. China’s dominant African trading partners are Angola, South Africa, Sudan, Nigeria, Egypt and Algeria.

African countries are also importing goods to support infrastructure investment and consumer spending. Standard Bank Group research shows that imports of machinery, transport equipment and textiles remain buoyant

“So, we see strong trade and constrained competitors as an ideal growth environment for banks with local presence and technical banking expertise,” says Mr Polkinghorne.

Standard Bank Group has recently expanded its client base to incorporate new jurisdictions in Africa. Mr Polkinghorne notes that the growth Standard Bank Group has experienced in issuing letters of credit shows growing trust in its ability to take on and manage the “Africa risk” portion of these transactions.

Standard Bank Group has used the opportunity to strengthen its position in trade finance in the energy, natural resources and agricultural sectors, says Mr Polkinghorne.

In one such recent deal, Standard Bank Group provided Tanzania’s Export Trading Group (ETG) with US $250-million in trade finance facilities. ETG is a leading integrated agricultural supply chain manager in East and Southern Africa.

In another transaction, Standard Bank Group assisted the Ghana Cocoa Board to secure a US$1.5-billion pre-export finance facility to purchase cocoa beans in the 2012/13 cocoa season. The facility is currently the largest non-oil deal in sub-Saharan Africa.

Standard Bank Group also acted as mandated lead arranger on the 2012 US $1.5bn Sonangol pre-export finance deal, further cementing the banks activities in Angola. Africa of course had three important global suppliers of crude oil; Angola, Egypt and Nigeria. Significant oil product import lines were provided across sub-Saharan Africa, where the Bank provides in excess of US $1bn of import trade finance lines across West, East and Southern Africa.

Oil and oil products remains a dominant influence in the continents GDP and is viewed as being strategically important to the success of the growth achieved by the continent as a whole, and as consumer discretionary spend increases, and car ownership rises, this will continue to be an important trade flow where the bank can provide bespoke trade finance solutions across the supply chain.

Mr Polkinghorne says: “An important change in growing our share of the trade finance market is that liquidity pressures have made the cost of funding for Standard Bank Group and its African counterparts more competitive when compared to European banks.

“We are seeing indications in the market that South African and other African banks are participating not only as lenders but co-arrangers on large pre-export finance deals.” he says.

Mr Polkinghorne notes that African banks are increasingly being called upon to step up their lending for trade transactions because of their stronger balance sheets and risk appetite.

“Natural resources, both within the oil and metals markets and the agriculture sector continue to dominate the African landscape. But it is perhaps the processes through which such resources are utilised, both in the facilitating of international and intra-regional trade and establishment of a suitable environment to conduct business that remain the key challenges. Local banks have increasingly found greater opportunities and increasing confidence to support major trade transactions, says Mr Polkinghorne.”

Source: StandardBank.com

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Atlantic Energy: How Indigenous Companies are Transforming the Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry

Posted on 06 March 2013 by The African Press Organization

 

Atlantic Energy (http://www.atlanticenergy.com) is a private upstream oil and gas group founded by Nigerian and international exploration and production (“E&P”) executives with an extensive track record and experience in the Nigerian E&P sector. The company currently operates in Nigeria and will continue in its Enduring Commitment to develop Nigeria and its abundant resources through energy and infrastructural development.

 

LAGOS, Nigeria, March 6, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ Atlantic Energy was a platinum sponsor at the recently concluded 13th Nigerian Oil and Gas conference, one of Africa’s largest oil and gas conference held in Abuja was a gathering of over 1000 national and international senior level delegates from the Upstream, Midstream and Downstream sectors of the oil and gas industry.

 

Representatives including the Nigerian Minister of Petroleum Resources, H.E. Diezani Alison-Madueke; Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), represented by the Group Managing Director, Andrew Yakubu and Group Executive Director, Exploration & Production, Abiye Membere; International and Indigenous Oil Companies (IOCs), Service Companies; Nigerian and international banks amongst others.

The Co-Chief Executive Officer of Atlantic Energy, Mr. Scott Aitken chaired the panel discussion on the topic: “Focus on Independents – How are Indigenous Companies Transforming the Nigerian Oil and Gas Industry? Key points that were discussed included: (1) Creating an enabling environment to encourage Nigerian companies to enter and expand operations; (2) what are the fiscal and regulatory incentives that indigenous companies require? (3) How can indigenous companies access the technical know-how and financing to further their operations? (4) The divestment process from IOCs to indigenous companies successes and pitfalls?

Mr. Aitken noted that while IOCs are responsible for over 90% of production in Nigeria, there are hundreds of undeveloped onshore discoveries, therefore, there is a need for more indigenous companies like Atlantic Energy to join in taking the Nigerian Oil and Gas industry forward.

He also noted that recently, the Nigerian government tasked the Nigerian Petroleum Development Company (NPDC), an operator (and fully owned subsidiary of the NNPC) who are in a strategic alliance with Atlantic Energy to develop a number of NPDC’s assets to drastically increase its production of crude oil and natural gas.

NPDC has 130,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) of current production with a target of reaching 250,000 bopd by 2015 and significantly increasing the supply of domestic gas to the country to enable an increase in power generation and support local manufacturing industries. Atlantic Energy through its Strategic Alliance with NPDC, will assist NPDC attain this target.

Additionally, he stated that a significant portion of the Nigeria’s marketed natural gas is processed into LNG and this natural gas only constituted 4% of the country’s energy consumption as at 2010; however, the power sector privatization is driving an increased demand for gas, with an installed capacity of 7,000 MW and a target capacity of 16,000 MW by the end of 2013.

Mr. Aitken further stated the challenges facing companies like Atlantic Energy and the wider industry and proffered solutions to the problems raging from old infrastructure, Swamp and land terrain, community stakeholder relationships and expectations, multiple partners/new models, to ambitious targets can be addressed through detailed evaluation and phased infrastructure replacement/upgrade, encouragement of swamp and land terrain asset management, community engagements and updates should be assessed, there should be project prioritization and clear centralization management structures including strong relationship building and there is a need to have fast track solutions to deliver early results to fund further development.

 

SOURCE

Atlantic Energy

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Libya could produce more energy in solar power than oil

Posted on 27 February 2013 by Africa Business

Libya could generate approximately five times the amount of energy from solar power than it currently produces in crude oil, research by Nottingham Trent University shows.

 

A study led by the university’s School of Architecture, Design and the Built Environment found that the oil-rich nation could generate enough renewable power to meet its own demand and a “significant part of the world energy demand by exporting electricity”.

 

Libya is located on the cancer orbit line and is exposed to the sun’s rays throughout the year with long hours during the day. It has an average daily solar radiation rate of about 7.1 kilowatt hours per square metre per day (kWh/m²/day) on a flat plane on the coast and 8.1kWh/m²/day in the south region. By comparison, the UK’s average solar radiation rate is less than half that amount at about 2.95kWh/m²/day.

 

If the North African country – which is estimated to be 88 per cent desert – used 0.1% of its landmass to harness solar power, it could produce the equivalent to almost seven million barrels of crude oil per day in energy, the study found. Currently, Libya produces about 1.41 million barrels of crude oil per day.

 

Researcher Dr Amin Al-Habaibeh, who is leading the Innovative and Sustainable Built Environment Technologies research group at the university, said: “Although Libya is rich in renewable energy resources, it is in urgent need of a more comprehensive energy strategy. It is difficult to break the dependency on oil and natural gas, not just in terms of the country’s demand for it, but also in terms of the revenues that it generates.

 

“Renewable energy technology is still in its early days in Libya and a clear strategy and timetable is needed to take it forward. In particular, work needs to be done to develop the skills and knowledge needed to install and maintain renewable energy systems.”

 

The study also found that Libya has the potential to generate significant amounts of wind power, as the country is exposed to dry, hot and prolonged gusts.

 

“Wind energy could play an important role in the future in meeting the total electric energy demand,” added Ahmed Mohamed, a Nottingham Trent University PhD student, from Libya, who worked on the project.

 

“Several locations, including a number along the coast, experience high wind speeds which last for long periods of time.

 

“If Libya could harness only a tiny fraction of the renewable energy resources it has available in the form of solar and wind power, not only could it meet its own demands for energy, but also a significant part of the world’s demands by exporting electricity.

 

“The availability of renewable energy could provide a good complement to meet peak loads and current energy demand, and this in turn can be a good reason for encouraging wind and solar energy projects in Libya.”

 

Dr Hafez Abdo, a senior lecturer in accounting at Nottingham Business School, who also supervised the study, added: “This study tackles a significant emerging issue that is related to the feasibility of implementing renewable energy options in an oil and gas rich country such as Libya. The study explores whether the benefits outstrip the costs of implementing these options, and if not then when this would be likely to happen.

 

“This study can be applied to other countries such as the UK as an oil producing country and Japan, for example, as a net oil and gas importer country. The significance of this study arises from the fact that the final results should be a stepping stone for other studies to find a sufficient solution to energy security and climate change in the world.”

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Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017

Posted on 06 February 2013 by Africa Business

NEW YORK, Feb., 2013  /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017
http://www.reportlinker.com/p0397016/Refining-Industry-Outlook-in-Middle-East-and-Africa-2013—Capacity-Analysis-Forecasts-and-Details-of-All-Operating-and-Planned-Refineries-to-2017.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Oil_and_Gas_energy

Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017

Summary

GlobalData’s energy offering, “Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017″ is the essential source for industry data and information relating to the refining industry in Middle East and Africa. It provides asset level information relating to active and planned refineries in Middle East and Africa. The details of major companies operating in the refining industry in Middle East and Africa are included in the report. The latest news and deals relating to the sector are also provided and analyzed.

This report is built using data and information sourced from proprietary databases, primary and secondary research and in-house analysis by GlobalData’s team of industry experts.

Scope

- Updated information relating to all active and planned refineries
- Provides historical data from 2005 to 2012, forecast to 2017
- Information on refining, FCC, hydrocracking and coking capacities by refinery and country
- Provides operator information for all active and planned refineries
- Identifies key trends and issues in the refining industry
- Information on the top companies in the sector including business description and strategic analysis. Key companies covered are National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Saudi Arabian Oil Company and Kuwait National Petroleum Company
- Product and brand updates, strategy changes, R&D projects, corporate expansions and contractions and regulatory changes.
- Key mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, private equity investments and IPOs.

Reasons to buy

- Obtain the most up to date information available on all active and planned refineries in Middle East and Africa
- Identify growth segments and opportunities in the industry.
- Facilitate market analysis and forecasting of future industry trends.
- Facilitate decision making on the basis of strong historic and forecast refinery and unit capacity data.
- Assess your competitor’s refining portfolio and its evolution
- Understand and respond to your competitors business structure, strategy and prospects.
- Develop strategies based on the latest operational, financial, and regulatory events.
- Do deals with an understanding of how competitors are financed, and the mergers and partnerships that have shaped the market.
- Identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the leading companies in Middle East and Africa.

Table of Contents

1 Table of CContents 2
1.1 List of Tables 8
1.2 List of Figures 10
2 Introduction 11
2.1 What is This Report About? 11
2.2 How to Use This Report? 11
2.3 Market Definition 11
3 Middle East And Africa Refining Industry 12
3.1 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Overview 12
3.1.1 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Key Data 12
3.1.2 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Total Refining Capacity 12
3.2 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry: Trends and Issues 15
3.2.1 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry: Key Drivers and Issues 15
3.3 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) 17
3.3.1 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran), Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 17
3.3.2 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran), Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 19
3.3.3 Refining Industry in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran), Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 20
3.4 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia 21
3.4.1 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 21
3.4.2 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 22
3.4.3 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 23
3.4.4 Refining Industry in Saudi Arabia, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 24
3.5 Refining Industry in Kuwait 24
3.5.1 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 25
3.5.2 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 25
3.5.3 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 26
3.5.4 Refining Industry in Kuwait, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 26
3.6 Refining Industry in Iraq 26
3.6.1 Refining Industry in Iraq, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 27
3.6.2 Refining Industry in Iraq, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 28
3.6.3 Refining Industry in Iraq, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 28
3.7 Refining Industry in Egypt 29
3.7.1 Refining Industry in Egypt, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 29
3.7.2 Refining Industry in Egypt, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 30
3.7.3 Refining Industry in Egypt, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 30
3.8 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates 31
3.8.1 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 31
3.8.2 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 32
3.8.3 Refining Industry in United Arab Emirates, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 32
3.9 Refining Industry in Algeria 33
3.9.1 Refining Industry in Algeria, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 33
3.9.2 Refining Industry in Algeria, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 34
3.10 Refining Industry in South Africa 34
3.10.1 Refining Industry in South Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 35
3.10.2 Refining Industry in South Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 35
3.10.3 Refining Industry in South Africa, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 36
3.11 Refining Industry in Nigeria 36
3.11.1 Refining Industry in Nigeria, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 37
3.11.2 Refining Industry in Nigeria, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 38
3.12 Refining Industry in Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 38
3.12.1 Refining Industry in Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 39
3.13 Refining Industry in Israel 39
3.13.1 Refining Industry in Israel, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 40
3.13.2 Refining Industry in Israel, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 40
3.13.3 Refining Industry in Israel, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 41
3.14 Refining Industry in Qatar 41
3.14.1 Refining Industry in Qatar, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 41
3.14.2 Refining Industry in Qatar, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 42
3.15 Refining Industry in Bahrain 42
3.15.1 Refining Industry in Bahrain, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 42
3.15.2 Refining Industry in Bahrain, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 43
3.15.3 Refining Industry in Bahrain, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 43
3.16 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic 43
3.16.1 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 44
3.16.2 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 44
3.16.3 Refining Industry in Syrian Arab Republic, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 45
3.17 Refining Industry in Sudan 45
3.17.1 Refining Industry in Sudan, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 45
3.17.2 Refining Industry in Sudan, Coking Capacity, 2005-2017 46
3.17.3 Refining Industry in Sudan, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 46
3.17.4 Refining Industry in Sudan, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 47
3.18 Refining Industry in Oman 47
3.18.1 Refining Industry in Oman, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 47
3.18.2 Refining Industry in Oman, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 48
3.18.3 Refining Industry in Oman, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 48
3.19 Refining Industry in Morocco 49
3.19.1 Refining Industry in Morocco, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 49
3.19.2 Refining Industry in Morocco, Fluid catalytic cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 50
3.19.3 Refining Industry in Morocco, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 50
3.20 Refining Industry in Yemen 51
3.20.1 Refining Industry in Yemen, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 51
3.21 Refining Industry in Jordan 52
3.21.1 Refining Industry in Jordan, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 52
3.21.2 Refining Industry in Jordan, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 52
3.21.3 Refining Industry in Jordan, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 53
3.22 Refining Industry in Cote d’Ivoire 53
3.22.1 Refining Industry in Cote d’Ivoire, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 53
3.22.2 Refining Industry in Cote d’Ivoire, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 54
3.23 Refining Industry in Kenya 54
3.23.1 Refining Industry in Kenya, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 54
3.24 Refining Industry in Cameroon 55
3.24.1 Refining Industry in Cameroon, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 55
3.24.2 Refining Industry in Cameroon, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 55
3.25 Refining Industry in Ghana 56
3.25.1 Refining Industry in Ghana, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 56
3.25.2 Refining Industry in Ghana, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 56
3.26 Refining Industry in Angola 57
3.26.1 Refining Industry in Angola, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 57
3.27 Refining Industry in Tunisia 57
3.27.1 Refining Industry in Tunisia, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 58
3.28 Refining Industry in Senegal 58
3.28.1 Refining Industry in Senegal, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 58
3.29 Refining Industry in Zambia 59
3.29.1 Refining Industry in Zambia, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 59
3.30 Refining Industry in Gabon 59
3.30.1 Refining Industry in Gabon, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 60
3.31 Refining Industry in Republic of the Congo 60
3.31.1 Refining Industry in Republic of the Congo, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 60
3.31.2 Refining Industry in Republic of the Congo, Hydrocracking Capacity, 2005-2017 61
3.32 Refining Industry in Chad 61
3.32.1 Refining Industry in Chad, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 61
3.33 Refining Industry in Republic of Niger 62
3.33.1 Refining Industry in Republic of Niger, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 62
3.33.2 Refining Industry in Republic of Niger, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Capacity, 2005-2017 62
3.34 Refining Industry in Republic of Guinea 63
3.34.1 Refining Industry in Republic of Guinea, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 63
3.35 Refining Industry in Uganda 63
3.35.1 Refining Industry in Uganda, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, 2005-2017 63
3.36 Middle East and Africa Refining Industry, Planned Refining Facilities 64
3.36.1 Refining Industry in Middle East and Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity, Planned Refining Facilities 64
4 Profile of National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company 65
4.1 National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Key Information 65
4.2 National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Company Overview 65
4.3 National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Business Description 65
4.3.1 Business Overview 65
5 Profile of Saudi Arabian Oil Company 67
5.1 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Key Information 67
5.2 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Company Overview 67
5.3 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Business Description 67
5.3.1 Business Overview 67
5.3.2 Exploration 68
5.3.3 Oil Operations 69
5.3.4 Refining and Chemicals 69
5.4 Saudi Arabian Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 70
5.4.1 Overview 70
5.4.2 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Strengths 71
5.4.3 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Weaknesses 73
5.4.4 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Opportunities 73
5.4.5 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Threats 75
6 Profile of Kuwait National Petroleum Company 76
6.1 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Key Information 76
6.2 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Company Overview 76
6.3 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Business Description 76
6.3.1 Business Overview 76
6.4 Kuwait National Petroleum Company, SWOT Analysis 77
6.4.1 Overview 77
6.4.2 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Strengths 78
6.4.3 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Weaknesses 78
6.4.4 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Opportunities 79
6.4.5 Kuwait National Petroleum Company Threats 80
7 Financial Deals Landscape 81
7.1 Detailed Deal Summary 81
7.1.1 Acquisition 81
7.1.2 Private Equity 85
7.1.3 Equity Offerings 86
7.1.4 Debt Offerings 87
7.1.5 Partnerships 90
7.1.6 Asset Transactions 95
8 Recent Developments 96
8.1 Strategy and Business Expansion 96
8.1.1 Oct 14, 2012: IOC To Help Raise Output At Nigerian Refineries 96
8.1.2 Sep 01, 2012: Orient Petroleum To Start New Refinery In Anambra State By 2013 96
8.1.3 Jul 02, 2012: Nigeria Signs MoU With Vulcan Petroleum To Build Six Refineries With $4.5 Billion Investment 96
8.1.4 May 21, 2012: PetroSA Signs JSA With Sinopec Group On Project Mthombo 96
8.1.5 Mar 05, 2012: RasGas Opens New Office At Ras Laffan In Qatar 97
8.2 Other Significant Developments 98
8.2.1 Jan 23, 2013: Kuwait To Partially Shut Mina Abdullah Refinery Units For Maintenance 98
8.2.2 Jan 09, 2013: Iran To Build Natural Gas Refinery With $1.6 Billion Investment 98
8.2.3 Jan 01, 2013: Petro Rabigh To Halt Operations At Saudi Refinery For Necessary Maintenance 98
8.2.4 Dec 17, 2012: Eni To Invest $8 Billion Over Next 10 Years To Develop Libyan Operations 98
8.2.5 Dec 05, 2012: Chevron Announces $36.7 Billion Capital And Exploratory Budget For 2013 99
8.2.6 Dec 03, 2012: Suncor Energy Provides Update On 2013 Capital Spending Plan And Production Outlook 101
8.2.7 Dec 03, 2012: NNPC Shuts Kaduna Refinery For Two Weeks Due To Routine Maintenance 102
8.2.8 Nov 06, 2012: Orpic Resumes Operations At Mina Al Fahal Refinery 102
8.2.9 Nov 05, 2012: Kuwait To Invest $100 Billion On Oil Projects In Next Five Years 102
8.2.10 Oct 29, 2012: Sasol And Total Natref Refinery Shut For Planned Maintenance 102
8.2.11 Oct 21, 2012: QInvest Arranges $200m Syndicated Facility For Tupras, Turkey 103
8.2.12 Oct 17, 2012: Nigeria To Invest NGN251 Billion On Refinery Upgrades 103
8.2.13 Sep 26, 2012: KNPC Resumes Operations At Mina Al-Ahmadi Refinery In Kuwait 103
8.3 New Contracts Announcements 104
8.3.1 Nov 14, 2012: Saudi Aramco Signs Contracts For Jazan Refinery And Terminal Project In Saudi Arabia 104
8.3.2 Jan 04, 2012: PMFG Secures Three New Project Awards Totaling $11m 105
9 Appendix 106
9.1 Abbreviations 106
9.2 Methodology 106
9.2.1 Coverage 106
9.2.2 Secondary Research 107
9.2.3 Primary Research 107
9.3 Contact Us 107
9.4 Disclaimer 108

List of Tables

Table 1: Middle East And Africa Refining Industry, Key Statistics, 2012 12
Table 2: Middle East And Africa, Refining Capacity by Country (MMTPA), 2005-2017 12
Table 3: Middle East And Africa, Refining Capacity by Company (MMTPA), 2005-2017 14
Table 4: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 17
Table 5: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 (Contd. 1) 18
Table 6: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 19
Table 7: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Iran (Islamic Republic of Iran) (MMTPA), 2005-2017 20
Table 8: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 21
Table 9: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 (Contd.1) 22
Table 10: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 22
Table 11: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 23
Table 12: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Saudi Arabia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 24
Table 13: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 25
Table 14: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 25
Table 15: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 26
Table 16: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Kuwait (MMTPA), 2005-2017 26
Table 17: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Iraq (MMTPA), 2005-2017 27
Table 18: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Iraq (MMTPA), 2005-2017 28
Table 19: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Iraq (MMTPA), 2005-2017 28
Table 20: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Egypt (MMTPA), 2005-2017 29
Table 21: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Egypt (MMTPA), 2005-2017 30
Table 22: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Egypt (MMTPA), 2005-2017 30
Table 23: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in United Arab Emirates (MMTPA), 2005-2017 31
Table 24: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in United Arab Emirates (MMTPA), 2005-2017 32
Table 25: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Cracking Unit Capacity in United Arab Emirates (MMTPA), 2005-2017 32
Table 26: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Algeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 33
Table 27: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Algeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 34
Table 28: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in South Africa (MMTPA), 2005-2017 35
Table 29: Middle East And Africa, Fluid catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in South Africa (MMTPA), 2005-2017 35
Table 30: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in South Africa (MMTPA), 2005-2017 36
Table 31: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Nigeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 37
Table 32: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Nigeria (MMTPA), 2005-2017 38
Table 33: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (MMTPA), 2005-2017 39
Table 34: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Israel (MMTPA), 2005-2017 40
Table 35: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Israel (MMTPA), 2005-2017 40
Table 36: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Israel (MMTPA), 2005-2017 41
Table 37: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Qatar (MMTPA), 2005-2017 41
Table 38: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Qatar (MMTPA), 2005-2017 42
Table 39: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Bahrain (MMTPA), 2005-2017 42
Table 40: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Bahrain (MMTPA), 2005-2017 43
Table 41: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Bahrain (MMTPA), 2005-2017 43
Table 42: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Syrian Arab Republic (MMTPA), 2005-2017 44
Table 43: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Syrian Arab Republic (MMTPA), 2005-2017 44
Table 44: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Syrian Arab Republic (MMTPA), 2005-2017 45
Table 45: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 45
Table 46: Middle East And Africa, Coking Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 46
Table 47: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 46
Table 48: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Sudan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 47
Table 49: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Oman (MMTPA), 2005-2017 47
Table 50: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Oman (MMTPA), 2005-2017 48
Table 51: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Oman (MMTPA), 2005-2017 48
Table 52: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Morocco (MMTPA), 2005-2017 49
Table 53: Middle East And Africa, Fluid catalytic cracking Unit Capacity in Morocco (MMTPA), 2005-2017 50
Table 54: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Morocco (MMTPA), 2005-2017 50
Table 55: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Yemen (MMTPA), 2005-2017 51
Table 56: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Jordan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 52
Table 57: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Jordan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 52
Table 58: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Jordan (MMTPA), 2005-2017 53
Table 59: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Cote d’Ivoire (MMTPA), 2005-2017 53
Table 60: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Cote d’Ivoire (MMTPA), 2005-2017 54
Table 61: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Kenya (MMTPA), 2005-2017 54
Table 62: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Cameroon (MMTPA), 2005-2017 55
Table 63: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Capacity in Cameroon (MMTPA), 2005-2017 55
Table 64: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Ghana (MMTPA), 2005-2017 56
Table 65: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Ghana (MMTPA), 2005-2017 56
Table 66: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Angola (MMTPA), 2005-2017 57
Table 67: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Tunisia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 58
Table 68: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Senegal (MMTPA), 2005-2017 58
Table 69: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Zambia (MMTPA), 2005-2017 59
Table 70: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Gabon (MMTPA), 2005-2017 60
Table 71: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Republic of the Congo (MMTPA), 2005-2017 60
Table 72: Middle East And Africa, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity in Republic of the Congo (MMTPA), 2005-2017 61
Table 73: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Chad (MMTPA), 2005-2017 61
Table 74: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Republic of Niger (MMTPA), 2005-2017 62
Table 75: Middle East And Africa, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity in Republic of Niger (MMTPA), 2005-2017 62
Table 76: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Republic of Guinea (MMTPA), 2005-2017 63
Table 77: Middle East And Africa, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity in Uganda (MMTPA), 2005-2017 63
Table 78: Middle East And Africa, Planned Crude Distillation Unit Capacity (MMTPA), 2013-2017 64
Table 79: National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company, Key Facts 65
Table 80: Saudi Arabian Oil Company, Key Facts 67
Table 81: Saudi Arabian Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 71
Table 82: Kuwait National Petroleum Company, Key Facts 76
Table 83: Kuwait National Petroleum Company, SWOT Analysis 77
Table 84: Sonangol Plans To Acquire 16.65% Interest In Galp Energia From Eni 81
Table 85: Arab Petroleum Sells 12.5% Stake In Bahrain National To Boubyan Petrochemical For $30 Million 82
Table 86: SOCAR To Acquire 24% Stake In SOCAR & Turcas Energy 83
Table 87: BP And Shell Plans To Sell Its Stake In SAPREF 84
Table 88: Qatar Holding Acquires Additional Stake In Total 85
Table 89: Oando Plans Public Offering Of Shares For $220.5 Million 86
Table 90: Oando Plans For Private Placement 86
Table 91: Tupras Files Prospectus For Public Offering Of Bonds For $1 Billion 87
Table 92: Dolphin Energy Completes Public Offering Of 5.5% Bonds Due 2021 For $1,300 Million 88
Table 93: Saudi Aramco Total Refining and Petrochemical Completes Public Offering Of Islamic Bond For $1,000 Million 89
Table 94: National Iranian Oil Plans To Issue Bonds For $15,000 Million 90
Table 95: Qatar Petroleum To Form Partnership To Develop Oil Refinery In Egypt 90
Table 96: Republic of Equatorial Guinea Plans To Form Partnership With Sinopec To Develop Refining And Petrochemical Complex 91
Table 97: PetroSA Enters Into Partnership With Sinopec To Build Oil Refinery In Africa 92
Table 98: Oman Oil Forms Joint Venture With International Petroleum Investment 93
Table 99: Sinopec Forms Joint Venture With Saudi Aramco 94
Table 100: PetroSA Plans To Acquire Downstream Energy Assets 95

List of Figures

Figure 1: Middle East and Africa, Country Wise Share Vis-à-vis Growth in Refining Capacity (%), 2007-2012 13
Figure 2: Middle East and Africa, Company Wise Share Vis-à-vis Growth in Refining Capacity (%), 2007-2012 14

Companies Mentioned

National Iranian Oil Refining and Distribution Company
Saudi Arabian Oil Company
Kuwait National Petroleum Company

To order this report:
Oil_and_Gas_energy Industry:
Refining Industry Outlook in Middle East and Africa, 2013 – Capacity Analysis, Forecasts and Details of All Operating and Planned Refineries to 2017

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Top 10 Emerging Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Markets and Market Developments in Unconventional Oil

Posted on 10 January 2013 by Africa Business

FARMINGTON, Conn., Jan. 10, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — The top 10 emerging oil and gas exploration and production markets include: the US Gulf of Mexico, Eagle Ford shale, Canada, the Santos basin in Brazil’s offshore region, Venezuela, Colombia, Poland and France in Europe, the western Siberian basin, Angola and Ghana in West Africa, and Mozambique and Tanzania in East Africa.

Global Information reports: Top 10 Emerging Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Markets and Market Developments in Unconventional Oil. (PRNewsFoto/Global Information, Inc.) PR Newswire

Of these 10 markets, Canada and Venezuela combined make up over 25% of the world’s extra-heavy oil and oil sands in proved oil reserves. In 2011, production from Canada’s oil sands and Venezuela’s extra-heavy oil belt posted approximately 581.9 MMbbl (million barrels) and 206.1 MMbbl, respectively. Set against the larger picture of oil production, unconventional oil only represented 3.1% of the global oil production industry in 2011. Meanwhile, sustained high crude oil prices continue to encourage the development of unconventional oil resources.

Global Top 10 Emerging Oil and Gas Exploration and Production (E&P) Markets – Market Analysis, Investment Scenario and Production Forecasts to 2020

In the Gulf of Mexico, although the number of new deepwater drilling permits declined since 2009, a rebound between September 2011 and March 2012 signaled a reduction in permit approval time and a gradual return to pre-blowout levels. These positive trends point to expectations that deepwater drilling in the US Gulf of Mexico will soon return to activity levels recorded before April 2010.

More highlights from the top 10 emerging oil and gas E&P markets include: Eagle ford shale – a sedimentary shale rock formation spanning 23 countries in south and east Texas – will emerge as a major crude oil production hub in the US. Home to 96% of the world’s oil sands, Canada has the third largest proved oil reserves on Earth. The Santos basin holds the highest volume of hydrocarbon reserves within the Brazilian subsalt region. Venezuela is the second largest developer of extra heavy oil reserves after Canada. In terms of resource potential, Poland and France represent key geographical locations for shale gas development in Europe. Angola and Ghana lead deep offshore oil and gas exploration in West Africa while Mozambique and Tanzania lead East Africa in the number of oil and gas discoveries made up until September 2012.

This report provides an overview of the top 10 emerging oil and gas E&P markets around the globe. An analysis of the major drivers and challenges affecting these leading markets, major exploration blocks and sedimentary basins, historic and projected crude oil and natural gas production are all provided in addition to financial deals activity and competitive landscape analyses.

An Executive Summary for this report and free sample pages from the full document are available at http://www.giiresearch.com/report/gd258632-global-top-10-emerging-oil-gas-exploration.html

Oil and Gas Exploration and Production in the North Sea – Market Analysis, Competitive Landscape and Forecast to 2020

Highlights from this report include: drivers of and challenges to oil and gas exploration and production in the North Sea region; major littoral countries’ contributions to the North Sea region’s total oil and gas production; key companies engaged in oil and gas exploration and production industry in the North Sea region; gross oil and gas production from the North Sea region, forecast until 2020; key exploration and production environment and infrastructure details in the UK, Norway, the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany; and an overview of the competitive landscape of the companies engaged in exploration and production activities in the North Sea region

An Executive Summary for this report and free sample pages from the full document are available at http://www.giiresearch.com/report/gd255058-oil-gas-exploration-production-north-sea-market.html

Unconventional Oil (Oil Shales, Oil Sands and Extra-heavy Oil) – Market Analysis, Industry Developments and Forecasts to 2020

Sustained high crude oil prices have been instrumental in making the development of unconventional oil resources economically viable. Oil prices above a certain threshold are essential for the development of unconventional oil projects as the development costs of unconventional oil projects are generally higher and therefore needs high oil prices to make them economical. Despite this seemingly precarious factor in the industry’s development, the price of crude oil is expected to remain over $80 per barrel in the long-term future and thus the development of production from unconventional oil projects remains attractive for oil companies.

An Executive Summary for this report and free sample pages from the full document are available at http://www.giiresearch.com/report/gd258629-unconventional-oil-oil-shales-oil-sands-extra.html

For more market research highlights, technical research news and industry updates, please visit http://www.giiresearch.com/press/

About Global Information Inc. Global Information (GII) (http://www.giiresearch.com) is an information service company partnering with over 300 research companies around the world. Global Information has been in the business of distributing technical and market research for more than 25 years. Expanded from its original headquarters in Japan, Global Information now has offices in Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Europe and the United States.

News distributed by PR Newswire iReach: https://ireach.prnewswire.com

 

SOURCE Global Information, Inc.

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New Research Report on South Africa Oil Market Analysis 2012

Posted on 04 January 2013 by Africa Business

New Market Research Report Added in MarketResearchReports.Biz Reports Database South Africa Oil Markets, 2012

 

(PR.com)– South Africa Oil Markets, 2012

Summary

This profile is the essential source for top-level energy industry data and information. The report provides an overview of each of the key sub-segments of the energy industry in South Africa. It details the market structure, regulatory environment, infrastructure and provides historical and forecasted statistics relating to the supply/demand balance for each of the key sub-segments. It also provides information relating to the crude oil assets (oil fields, refineries, pipelines and oil storage terminals) in South Africa. The report compares the investment environment in South Africa with other countries in the region. The profiles of the major companies operating in the crude oil sector in South Africa together with the latest news and deals are also included in the report.

Scope

Historic and forecast data relating to production, consumption, imports, exports and reserves are provided for each industry sub-segment for the period 2000-2020.

Historical and forecast data and information for all the major oil fields, refineries, pipelines and storage terminals in South Africa for the period 2005-2016.

Operator and equity details for major crude oil assets in South Africa.

Key information relating to market regulations, key energy assets and the key companies operating in the South Africas energy industry.

Information on the top companies in South Africa including business description, strategic analysis, and financial information.

Product and brand updates, strategy changes, R&D projects, corporate expansions and contractions and regulatory changes.

Key mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, private equity and venture capital investments, and IPOs.

Reasons to buy

Gain a strong understanding of the countrys energy market.

Facilitate market analysis and forecasting of future industry trends.

Facilitate decision making on the basis of strong historic and forecast production, reserves and capacity data.

Assess your competitors major crude oil assets and their performance.

Analyze the latest news and financial deals in the oil sector of each country.
Develop strategies based on the latest operational, financial, and regulatory events.

Do deals with an understanding of how competitors are financed, and the mergers and partnerships that have shaped the market.

Identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the leading companies in the country.

To Buy A Copy Of This Report Kindly Visit:

http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/analysis/154273

To Browse All Reports Kindly visit: http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/

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