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Branding Africa and debunking the myths about its potential

Posted on 13 May 2013 by Africa Business

CAPE-TOWN, South-Africa, May 13, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ Africa cannot continue to be marketed as a country, when it is a continent of 54 countries, which, by 2040 will have the largest workforce in the world. The statement was made by the Economic Commission for Africa’s Executive Secretary, Mr. Carlos Lopes at the World Economic Forum on Africa this week during a session aptly titled:Myth Busting; investing in Africa.

Mr. Lopes underscored that by 2040, Africa will be more urbanized‚ connected and educated. “It will be a very different picture from what is now,” he said.

Discussions underscored that perceptions on risks and uncertainties with respect to investing in Africa have been made to look like reality. “While some issues may be real, there are many advancements that bust perceptions of corruption, lack of growth and lack of capacity, among others.

The session underscored that Africa has a growing middle class. With increased incomes, the emerging picture shows a continent where two-thirds of its growth comes from consumption; as a result, Lagos has a much bigger purchasing power than Mumbai.

“Africa has twice as much per capita than India, more cell phones than India, less poor people than India, and we can go on and on! The mega trends are in favor of Africa,” stressed Lopes

But for the Continent to reap the demographic dividends, it must address the question of infrastructure, which is necessary for industrialization and for bringing the Continent’s rural areas to the global market. In this regard, a significant amount of money is needed to realize the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) and since markets do not invest in these kinds of projects, the session underscored the need for alternative sources of funding.

“The good news is that money exists in Africa – but a shift in mindset is needed to tap into the half a trillion dollars sitting in African Central Banks as reserves,” stressed the panelists. PIDA projects, participants noted, could be broken into ‘short-range projects’, all aimed at a long-term goal.

The session also addressed the perception that Africa is lacking in skilled personnel and underscored that Africa has been on the cutting edge of innovations. However, branding and marketing of these innovations fails beyond the borders.

“Many African economies are run by informal sector, where banks do not come to the party and so the entrepreneurs in these informal sectors do not grow,” said a participant, stressing that the myth that must be busted is that these informal entrepreneurs cannot grow into big business with appropriate financing. The session acknowledged, however, that the lack of depth in the capital markets is real and it limits the possibilities for innovations to grow.

On the question of “corrupt African leaders”, the session acknowledged that the weakness lies in the capacity to investigate and get convictions, as well as lack of consistency and leadership.

Participants highlighted that the lack of a strategic vision makes corruption lead the narrative and countries like Malaysia, Indonesia are able to project their narratives on their strategic visions and less on corruption.

The need for consistency in regulatory frameworks and policy was stressed, “as it reduces the meddling of government in areas where the private sector is meant to play.”

In addition, it was felt that consistency across administrations is also important to ensure that investors play fairly. “Investors do not always like regulations,” said a participant, highlighting that the commodity boom super cycle led to an increase in profits by mining companies “by at least 200 per cent, yet tax revenues in the affected countries increasing by only 30 per cent.”

Further, the perception that ’54 countries constitute one country where there are no positive stories to be told’ could be attributed to failure by the media and the lack of attention to marketing by African governments.

A key issue that emerged is the persistence of information gaps, created by lack of country assessments. In addition, participants wondered whether those doing business in Africa might be contributing to the myths. Doing so, they said, creates entry barriers for potential competitors, and keeps resident players laughing all the way to the bank with premium returns.

“It is important to be here in Africa to understand the context; one has to understand where to invest and why one is investing,” stressed an investor.

 

SOURCE

Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)

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A.M. Best Special Report: Indonesia’s Growth Attracts Insurers, While Capital Requirements Deter Them

Posted on 07 May 2013 by Africa Business

 

Please read here Indonesia Market Review – May 2 2013 (Acrobat Reader)

 

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Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness Markets Set to Top US$ One Trillion in 2030

Posted on 06 March 2013 by Africa Business

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Africa has the potential to create a trillion-dollar food market
  • But farmers need better access to help them grow and trade their products
  • A new report outlines challenges and solutions to Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness sectors

WASHINGTON –A new World Bank report “Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness,” says that Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods.  The report calls on governments to work side-by-side with agribusinesses, to link farmers with consumers in an increasingly urbanized Africa.

“The time has come for making African agriculture and agribusiness a catalyst for ending poverty,” says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa Region. “We cannot overstate the importance of agriculture to Africa’s determination to maintain and boost its high growth rates, create more jobs, significantly reduce poverty, and grow enough cheap, nutritious food to feed its families, export its surplus crops, while safeguarding the continent’s environment.”

New Findings

Good prospects: Africa’s food and beverage markets are projected to reach $1 trillion by 2030. By way of comparison, the current size of the market is $313 billion, offering the prospect of a three-fold increase, bringing more jobs, greater prosperity, less hunger, and significantly more opportunity enabling African farmers to compete globally.

Performance boost needed: Africa’s agriculture and agribusinesses are underperforming.  Many developing countries such as Brazil, Indonesia, and Thailand now export more food products than all of Sub-Saharan Africa combined.  Even as export shares are falling, import of food products is rising.  The report argues that these adverse trends can be reversed through good policies, sustained public-private investment, and strong public-private partnerships backed by open, transparent procedures and processes along the entire value chain.

Untapped land and water: Africa has more than half of the world’s fertile yet unused land.  Africa uses only two percent of its renewable water resources compared to the global average of five percent.  Post-harvest losses run 15 to 20 percent for cereals and are higher for perishable products due to poor storage and other farm infrastructure.

While pointing to the need for significant investment in infrastructure the report carries an unequivocal warning: in the rush to allocate land for agribusiness, care needs to be taken so that acquisitions do not threaten people’s livelihoods and land purchases or leases are conducted according to ethical and socially responsible standards, including recognizing local users’ rights, holding consultations with local communities, and paying fair market-rate compensation for land acquired.

Adding Value

The report took an in-depth look at entire value chains – the process for taking products from farms to markets – for five commodities, rice, maize, cocoa, dairy and green beans.  Africa is the world’s leading importer and consumer of rice, paying US$3.5 billion for import bills. By increasing rice production, Senegal can help meet local demand but more capital is needed together with greater investment in irrigation and easing restrictions on access to land. Ghana, another top importer, produces more varieties of rice but at significantly higher cost.

“Improving Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness sectors means higher incomes and more jobs. It also allows Africa to compete globally. Today, Brazil, Indonesia and Thailand each export more food products than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined.  This must change,” says Jamal Saghir, World Bank Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region.

Success Story

Although much of Eastern and Southern Africa is well suited to dairy production, only Kenya has established a competitive dairy industry. Kenya’s industry is based partly on a formal sector for processed milk and other dairy products, but its dynamic informal sector (based mostly on raw milk) is even more important, supplying over 80 percent of the market. Kenya’s success largely comes from the entrepreneurship of smallholders’ who choose high milk-yielding cross-bred cattle, improved feeds and paid better attention to animal health.  Also, Kenya success points to the importance of improving linkages to the formal sector through cooperative milk collection and milk cooling centers. Even though challenges remain government policy, especially flexibility in setting quality and safety standards for the informal chain were vital.

Looking Ahead

The report says agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. Strong leadership and commitment from both public and private sectors is needed.  For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors is critical, as is the need for strengthening of safeguards, land administration systems, and screening investments for sustainable growth.  Concluding on an upbeat note, the report says Africa can draw on many local successes to guide governments and investors toward positive economic, social and environmental outcomes.

“African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa.  “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

 

Source: WorldBank.org

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Africa’s Food Markets Could Create One Trillion Dollar Opportunity by 2030

Posted on 06 March 2013 by Africa Business

WASHINGTON, March, 2013 - Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods, and if African governments can work more closely with agribusinesses to feed the region’s fast-growing urban population, according to a new World Bank report launched today.

According to the Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness report, Africa’s food systems, currently valued at US$313 billion a year from agriculture, could triple if governments and business leaders radically rethink their policies and support to agriculture, farmers, and agribusinesses, which together account for nearly 50 percent of Africa’s economic activity.

The time has come for making African agriculture and agribusiness a catalyst for ending poverty,” says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa Region. “We cannot overstate the importance of agriculture to Africa’s determination to maintain and boost its high growth rates, create more jobs, significantly reduce poverty, and grow enough cheap, nutritious food to feed its families, export its surplus crops, while safeguarding the continent’s environment.”

Agribusiness: strong growth opportunities

Due to a combination of population growth, rising incomes and urbanization, strong demand is driving global food and agricultural prices higher.  Supply issues – slowing yield growth of major food crops, slowdown in research spending, land degradation and water scarcity issues, and a changing climate all mean that prices will remain high.  In this new market climate, Africa has great potential for expanding its food and agricultural exports.

Africa holds almost 50 percent of the world’s uncultivated land which is suited for growing food crops, comprising as many as 450 million hectares that are not forested, protected, or densely populated. Africa uses less than 2 percent of its renewable water sources, compared to a world average of five percent. Its harvests routinely yield far less than their potential and, for mainstay food crops such as maize the yield gap is as wide as 60 to 80 percent. Post-harvest losses run 15 to 20 percent for cereals and are higher for perishable products due to poor storage and other farm infrastructure.

African countries can tap into booming markets in rice, maize, soybeans, sugar, palm oil, biofuel and feedstock and emerge as major exporters of these commodities on world markets similar to the successes scored by Latin America and Southeast Asia.  For Sub-Saharan Africa, the most dynamic sectors are likely to be rice, feed grains, poultry, dairy, vegetable oils, horticulture and processed foods to supply domestic markets.

The report cautions that even as land will be needed for some agribusiness investments, such acquisitions can threaten people’s livelihoods and create local opposition unless land purchases or leases are conducted according to ethical and socially responsible standards, including recognizing local users’ rights, thorough consultations with local communities, and fair market-rate compensation for land acquired.

Improving Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness sectors means higher incomes and more jobs. It also allows Africa to compete globally. Today, Brazil, Indonesia and Thailand each export more food products than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined.  This must change,” says Jamal Saghir, World Bank Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region.

Value Chains are essential

Rice: Africa has become a major consumer and importer of rice, and Africans import half the rice they eat and pay top dollar for it, $3.5 billion per year and more.  Ghana and Senegal are significant importers.  Senegal is competitive among its neighbors, but it is held back by the difficulty farmers have in accessing land, capital, finance for irrigation expansion and appropriate crop varieties.  Ghana produces fewer varieties of rice than Senegal, but at significantly higher cost, and levies 40 percent tariffs and other charges on imports. Poor grain quality, cleanliness and packaging are major deterrents for consumers constraining the sector’s performance.

Maize: A food staple for many Africans, maize is grown on 25 million hectares or 14 percent of cropped land. In Zambia where people eat on average 133 kilograms of cereals a year, maize provides half the calories in their diets.  Zambia is competitive when importing maize but fails on exports.  High transport costs, higher labor costs and lower yields combine to increase costs by one-third compared to Thailand, a major international producer of rain-fed maize.  The report argues that Zambia’s future competitiveness depends on raising yields, reducing costs, and removing disincentives for the private sector in markets and trade.

In addition, the study reviewed value chains for cocoa in Ghana and dairy and green beans in Kenya.

African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa.  “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

Solutions

Agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. The report calls for strong leadership and commitment for both public and private sectors.  As comparators, the report cites case studies from Uruguay, Indonesia and Malaysia. For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors is critical, as is the strengthening of safeguards, land administration systems, and screening investments for sustainable growth.

The report notes that Africa can also draw on many local successes to guide governments and investors toward positive economic, social and environmental outcomes.

 

Source: WorldBank.org

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Africa’s Food Markets Could Create One Trillion Dollar Opportunity by 2030

Posted on 04 March 2013 by Africa Business

WASHINGTON, March 4, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods, and if African governments can work more closely with agribusinesses to feed the region’s fast-growing urban population, according to a new World Bank report launched today.

 

According to the Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusinessreport, Africa’s food systems, currently valued at US$313 billion a year from agriculture, could triple if governments and business leaders radically rethink their policies and support to agriculture, farmers, and agribusinesses, which together account for nearly 50 percent of Africa’s economic activity.

 

“The time has come for making African agriculture and agribusiness a catalyst for ending poverty,” says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa Region. “We cannot overstate the importance of agriculture to Africa’s determination to maintain and boost its high growth rates, create more jobs, significantly reduce poverty, and grow enough cheap, nutritious food to feed its families, export its surplus crops, while safeguarding the continent’s environment.”

 

Agribusiness: strong growth opportunities

 

Due to a combination of population growth, rising incomes and urbanization, strong demand is driving global food and agricultural prices higher. Supply issues – slowing yield growth of major food crops, slowdown in research spending, land degradation and water scarcity issues, and a changing climate all mean that prices will remain high. In this new market climate, Africa has great potential for expanding its food and agricultural exports.

 

Africa holds almost 50 percent of the world’s uncultivated land which is suited for growing food crops, comprising as many as 450 million hectares that are not forested, protected, or densely populated. Africa uses less than 2 percent of its renewable water sources, compared to a world average of five percent. Its harvests routinely yield far less than their potential and, for mainstay food crops such as maize the yield gap is as wide as 60 to 80 percent. Post-harvest losses run 15 to 20 percent for cereals and are higher for perishable products due to poor storage and other farm infrastructure.

 

African countries can tap into booming markets in rice, maize, soybeans, sugar, palm oil, biofuel and feedstock and emerge as major exporters of these commodities on world markets similar to the successes scored by Latin America and Southeast Asia. For Sub-Saharan Africa, the most dynamic sectors are likely to be rice, feed grains, poultry, dairy, vegetable oils, horticulture and processed foods to supply domestic markets.

 

The report cautions that even as land will be needed for some agribusiness investments, such acquisitions can threaten people’s livelihoods and create local opposition unless land purchases or leases are conducted according to ethical and socially responsible standards, including recognizing local users’ rights, thorough consultations with local communities, and fair market-rate compensation for land acquired.

 

“Improving Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness sectors means higher incomes and more jobs. It also allows Africa to compete globally. Today, Brazil, Indonesia and Thailand each export more food products than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined. This must change,” says Jamal Saghir, World Bank Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region.

 

Value Chains are essential

 

Rice: Africa has become a major consumer and importer of rice, and Africans import half the rice they eat and pay top dollar for it, $3.5 billion per year and more. Ghana and Senegal are significant importers. Senegal is competitive among its neighbors, but it is held back by the difficulty farmers have in accessing land, capital, finance for irrigation expansion and appropriate crop varieties. Ghana produces fewer varieties of rice than Senegal, but at significantly higher cost, and levies 40 percent tariffs and other charges on imports. Poor grain quality, cleanliness and packaging are major deterrents for consumers constraining the sector’s performance.

 

Maize: A food staple for many Africans, maize is grown on 25 million hectares or 14 percent of cropped land. In Zambia where people eat on average 133 kilograms of cereals a year, maize provides half the calories in their diets. Zambia is competitive when importing maize but fails on exports. High transport costs, higher labor costs and lower yields combine to increase costs by one-third compared to Thailand, a major international producer of rain-fed maize. The report argues that Zambia’s future competitiveness depends on raising yields, reducing costs, and removing disincentives for the private sector in markets and trade.

 

In addition, the study reviewed value chains for cocoa in Ghana and dairy and green beans in Kenya.

 

“African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa. “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

 

Solutions

 

Agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. The report calls for strong leadership and commitment for both public and private sectors. As comparators, the report cites case studies from Uruguay, Indonesia and Malaysia. For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors is critical, as is the strengthening of safeguards, land administration systems, and screening investments for sustainable growth.

 

The report notes that Africa can also draw on many local successes to guide governments and investors toward positive economic, social and environmental outcomes.

 

SOURCE

The World Bank

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Billions lost from the poor provision of water and sanitation

Posted on 01 February 2013 by Thandisizwe Mgudlwa

By Thandisizwe Mgudlwa

LIBERIAN President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says the World loses $260 billion from poor water and sanitation,

Reports from Monrovia, Liberia, confirm the Nobel Peace Prize winner and Liberian President Sirleaf issued a stark warning in Monrovia on Wednesday to the UN Secretary-General’s High-level Panel that is meeting this week to address the future of international poverty reduction efforts, noting that economic losses due to poor water and sanitation access globally are costing $260 billion (US) every year.

The President, one of three co-Chairs of the UN Secretary-General’s High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, stated on Wednesday (30 January 2013) that:

“$260 billion in economic losses annually is directly linked to inadequate water supply and sanitation around the world.  We must take this issue more seriously.”

“All too often access to adequate sanitation in particular is seen as an outcome of development, rather than a driver of economic development and poverty reduction.  South Korea, Malaysia and Singapore in the 1960’s and 1970’s demonstrated the potential for boosting economic development by addressing sanitation.”

In addition, the President’s comments came during the High-level Panel meeting in Monrovia which was broadly focused on the theme of “economic transformation”.

Also, The Panel, which includes 27 leaders from government, the private sector and civil society, is co-chaired by UK Prime Minister David Cameron, President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono of Indonesia and President Sirleaf.  The group is tasked with producing a report in May to the Secretary-General containing recommendations for a development agenda for the world.

The current Millennium Development Goal targets on water and sanitation have had starkly differing levels of progress and political and financial support.  While the drinking water target – to halve the proportion of people worldwide without access to safe drinking water – was met five years early in 2010, the sanitation goal is decades off track.  Progress in Africa specifically is even worse with sub-Saharan Africa expected to meet this goal a century and a half late, according to the latest research.

Girish Menon, Director of International Programmes for the international water and sanitation charity WaterAid, said:

“The High Level Panel must grasp this unique opportunity to put together an ambitious vision for eradicating poverty in our time.  For this aspiration to be realised there must be a central focus on achieving universal access to water, sanitation and hygiene.”

“International efforts on the existing Millennium Development Goals have shown us that to succeed in areas like education, child health and gender equality progress on access to water, sanitation and hygiene is crucial.  Integrating these approaches will be the key to success.”

Liberia is in many ways typical of sub-Saharan African countries, with access to safe drinking water at 73% of the population, far exceeding levels of access to decent sanitation, at only 18%.  The average across sub-Saharan Africa to these services sits at 61% for water but just 30% for sanitation.

President Sirleaf, who is also Goodwill Ambassador for water, sanitation and hygiene in Africa, also stated:

“Without more progress in providing access to safe water and effective sanitation, children will continue to miss school, health costs will continue to be a drag on national economies, adults will continue to miss work, and women and girls, and it’s almost always women and girls, will continue to spend hours every day fetching water, typically from dirty sources.”

According to a 2012 WaterAid report, the lives of 2.5 million people around the world would be saved every year if everybody had access to safe water and adequate sanitation.

The international charity has also highlighted that if governments meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to halve the proportion of their population without sanitation by 2015 the lives of 400,000 children under the age of five will be saved around the world – over 100,000 in Nigeria, and 66,000 in India alone.

WaterAid will be in Liberia all week, with spokespeople available for interview on the post-MDG agenda.

WaterAid Spokespeople in Liberia:

•          Girish Menon, Director of International Programmes and Deputy Chief Executive
•          Nelson Gomondo, Pan-Africa Programme Manager – Southern Africa
•          Hannah Ellis, International Campaigns Manager
•          Willice Onyango, WaterAid Youth Ambassador and chair, International Youth Council, Kenya

WaterAid Spokespeople in London:

•          Margaret Batty, Director of Policy and Campaigns
•          Tom Slaymaker, Senior Policy Analyst (Governance), and Deputy Head of Policy
•          Fleur Anderson, Head of Campaigns

FURTHERMORE:

•          The $260 (US) billion figures relating to the global cost of a lack of water and sanitation access was calculated in a 2012 World Health Organisation report that can be found at http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/…/2012/globalcosts.pdf
•          More information on the High Level Panel can be found at http://www.post2015hlp.org
•          Figures on rates to access to water and sanitation can be found http://www.wssinfo.org
•          Figures on the impact of meeting the MDG water and sanitation targets on mortality can be found at http://www.wateraid.org/documents/Saving_Lives_Notes_Final.pdf
•          783 million people in the world do not have access to safe water. This is roughly one in eight of the world’s population.
•          2.5 billion people in the world do not have access to adequate sanitation, this is 39% of the world’s population.
•          For every $1 invested in water and sanitation, $4 is returned in increased productivity.

WaterAid transforms lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation in some of the world’s poorest communities.  We work in 27 countries across Africa, Asia, Central America and the Pacific region.  Over the past 30 years, WaterAid has reached 15.9 million people with safe water and, since 2004, 11 million people with sanitation.

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Sluggish Productivity Growth Holding Back World’s Economies

Posted on 22 January 2013 by Africa Business

Slowdown in Productivity Felt Across the Globe in 2012, Little Improvement Projected for 2013

 

NEW YORK, Jan., 2013 /PRNewswire/ – For the second straight year, productivity growth weakened substantially across the globe in 2012, according to a new report from The Conference Board. The 2013 Productivity Brief, based on data from The Conference Board Total Economy Database™, reports that productivity grew by 1.8 percent worldwide in 2012, down from 2.3 percent in 2011 and 3.6 percent in 2010. With the exception of the 2008–9 recession, this represents the slowest productivity growth in a decade.

Labor productivity growth — that is, additional output per unit of labor — relates output growth to changes in the employment market. In 2012, world GDP growth fell to 3.1 percent from 3.8 percent in 2011, while employment growth fell only slightly from 1.4 to 1.3 percent. “What makes this year’s Brief so unique is that poor productivity performance has been so widespread that there are very few countries or regions in 2012 that showed any productivity improvement at all,” said The Conference Board Chief Economist Bart van Ark. “Facing slow global demand, companies are using labor and capital less efficiently, in turn forcing further cutbacks.”

Productivity growth is expected to remain anemic — 1.9 percent — this year.

“In 2013 and beyond, productivity will be key to the performance of the global economy,” van Ark said. “Even if labor markets recover more strongly than predicted, GDP growth is unlikely to accelerate past projections without a turnaround that makes jobs more productive, rather than simply more numerous. The situation is clearly resonant in The Conference Board CEO Challenge® 2013, our recent global survey that found CEOs intensely focused on the internal capabilities of their organizations. For such business leaders, the urgency of the productivity challenge means investing in the training, innovation, and operational excellence necessary to shape a more efficient workforce.”

Stagnant Output Undermining Productivity of Mature Economies

On average, the productivity slowdown across the advanced economies in 2012 was to a much greater extent attributable to declining output growth, rather than labor market performance.

In the United States, total hours worked grew 2 percent in 2012, doubling the previous year’s 1 percent growth. This renewed traction in the labor market was offset, however, by GDP growth that only rose from 1.8 to 2.2 percent. As a result, labor productivity growth fell dramatically to 0.2 percent —one of the slowest growth rates observed in the post-World War II period. Output per hour grew slower than 2012′s 0.2 percent just twice: in 1974 (-1.0 percent) and 1982 (-0.8 percent).

In the Euro Area, output and total hours worked both contracted in 2012. With the former decline outstripping the latter, growth in labor productivity in 2012 fell to 0.6 percent from 1.2 percent in 2011. At 2.3 percent, Spain posted the highest labor productivity growth within the currency bloc, driven by a large contraction (−3.7 percent) in hours worked. In Greece, at the other extreme, labor productivity fell at −1.3 percent. In Germany and France, the productivity growth rates also fell considerably in 2012. In Germany, output per hour increased 0.4 percent, down from 1.6 percent in 2011, and in France it dropped to −0.2 percent down from 1.4 percent in 2011.

Conditions in the wider European Union-27 largely mirrored those of the smaller 17-member bloc. Some Eastern and Central European economies were exceptions: Labor productivity in Poland grew 2.2 percent in 2012 and, with output per hour still just 38.7 percent that of the U.S., maintains substantial scope for improvement. In the United Kingdom, by contrast, a much larger than anticipated GDP contraction, coupled with stable increases in hours worked, turned labor productivity growth dramatically negative in 2012, at −1.3 percent. Output per hour worked in the U.K. now stands at just 80 percent of the U.S. level, some 10 percentage points lower than its French and German rivals.

In Japan, tepid recovery from the March 2011 tsunami — both GDP and total hours worked grew just 0.6 percent — left productivity growth stalled at 0 percent.

Silver Linings Harder to Find in Emerging Economies

In recent years, stagnant gains in the mature economies offered an opening for other economies to rapidly make up productivity gulfs that remains yawning in absolute terms. In 2012, however, emerging and developing economies — where labor productivity growth fell from 4.7 to 3.8 percent — contributed as much to the overall slowdown as their mature counterparts.

China still boasts among the largest productivity gains in the world. But after falling from 8.8 to 7.4 percent (largely on the basis of slowing GDP growth), labor productivity growth in 2012 was the lowest since 1999. As China maneuvers to climb the value chain, incremental efficiency gains will likely be harder to come by than the previous decade; the next leap will require investments in technology and innovation that take a significantly longer time to come to fruition. Likewise driven by slowing output growth as well as unique structural challenges, labor productivity in India grew at the slowest rate since 2002, falling to 3.7 percent in 2012 from 4.2 percent in 2011 (and 6.2 percent in 2010).

The only region in Asia — or, indeed, the world — to see widespread productivity acceleration in 2012 was the ASEAN countries in Southeast Asia, where strengthening domestic sectors offset the global slowdown in exports. Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam all saw labor productivity growth rates rise. Indonesia experienced a minor slowdown to 4.2 percent, still historically high.

A dramatic slowdown continued in Latin America, where labor productivity grew at just 1.2 percent in 2012, down from 2 percent in 2011 and 3.1 percent in 2010. Sputtering global demand has revealed serious underlying weaknesses in Brazil, where deteriorating output turned the productivity growth rate negative (−0.3 percent), compared to 4.1 percent in 2010. Mexico has held up much better; though its labor productivity growth fell to 0.7 percent in 2012, the decline was predicated on stable output growth and rapid expansion of employment.

Weakening oil prices and continued political unrest also slowed productivity growth in much of the Middle East. Meanwhile, labor productivity across Africa grew a modest 0.8 percent in 2012, tamped down by rapidly expanding workforces in many countries. In Russia, the growth rate fell slightly from 3.8 to 3.4 percent in 2012. Because employment only grew 0.3 percent, most of Russia’s output growth last year was driven by productivity gains.

Searching for a More Productive 2013?

At 1.9 percent, the Productivity Brief projects labor productivity growth will be nearly unchanged overall in 2013 – but rest on a slightly reordered constellation of regional trends. U.S. labor productivity should rise slightly, from 0.2 to 0.6 percent, while the Euro Area moves in precisely the opposite direction, from 0.6 to 0.2 percent. Within Europe, last year’s large discrepancies between countries are projected to narrow: Productivity will likely be flat in the U.K., with positive gains returning to France (0.2 percent) and ticking up in Germany (0.8 percent). But Spain’s impressive productivity growth is expected to plummet to 0.4 percent in 2013, as continued GDP contraction meets a labor market already pared to the bone.

Meanwhile, productivity growth is poised to soften further in China and, especially, India — where gains in labor productivity may fall to just 2.9 percent. Brazil’s situation remains fraught, but a modest strengthening of output combined with more cautious hiring plans should return Brazilian labor productivity to positive growth in 2013, at perhaps 1.2 percent. Likewise, the struggling Turkish economy is projected to see productivity growth improve from 1.0 to 1.6 percent, because of a labor market likely to decelerate even faster than GDP. Surprisingly, it may be Africa that offers the best hope in 2013 for substantial productivity gains driven by strong, accelerating output growth; several countries in the region — the world’s least productive in absolute terms — are positioned for burgeoning exports to other emerging markets and a rising middle-class consumer segment at home.

See 2013 Productivity Brief: Key Findings for additional data and detailed analysis at http://www.conference-board.org/pdf_free/economics/TED2.pdf

About The Conference Board
The Conference Board is a global, independent business membership and research association working in the public interest. Our mission is unique: To provide the world’s leading organizations with the practical knowledge they need to improve their performance and better serve society. The Conference Board is a non-advocacy, not-for-profit entity holding 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt status in the United States. www.conference-board.org

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Russian Railways Logistics Starts Transportation of Synthez-Kauchuk Products to India, Indonesia and South-East Asia

Posted on 10 January 2013 by Africa Business

Russian Railways Logistics started transportation of the finished goods produced by JSC Synthez-Kauchuk for export. The first 30 containers with the company cargo were shipped at the end of December 2012 to India, Indonesia and South-East Asia. Russian Railways Logistics branch in St. Petersburg provided the service including sending trucks to the plant, transportation of the cargo to logistic terminal in St. Petersburg, Russia, cargo containerization at the terminal, delivery of loaded containers to the port, port forwarding and sea freight.  Starting from January 2013 the current scheme with the truck involvement will be supplemented by the option of empty containers provision to the plant and returning the loaded containers by rail to the port.

JSC Synthez-Kauchuk is one of largest Russian producers of propylene, cis-isoprene, epichlorohydrin and other types of synthetic rubber. In 2009 the company became the second company in Russia to start commercial production of new environmentally friendly styrene butadiene rubber. Currently the company exports its products to the countries like Italy, France, Spain, Germany, Finland, Poland, Hungary, China, India, Indonesia, and South Korea.

ABOUT Russian Railways Logistics

JSC Russian Railways Logistics was founded in 2010 for the purpose of logistics business development within “Russian Railways” Holding. In cooperation with Russian Railways Holding subsidiaries and leading global transportation companies RZD Logistics offers high-quality delivery solutions for its customers all over the world.

In 2011 RZD Logistics organized more than 1.5 mn tons of cargo delivery. Net profit of the company of amounted to RUB97.2 mn in 2011.

Russian Railways Logistics offers rail, road and sea-freight, storage and terminal handling, customs and insurance services, supply chain management.

For further information please go to www.rzdlog.ru

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New Research Report on Power Markets in Emerging Economies to 2020

Posted on 04 January 2013 by Africa Business

New Market Research Report Added in MarketResearchReports.Biz Reports Database Power Markets in Emerging Economies – Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020

 

Power Markets in Emerging Economies Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020

Summary

GlobalData’s report, “Power Markets in Emerging Economies Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020″, gives detailed information on seven emerging countries, namely, India, China, Russia, Brazil, South Africa, Mexico and Indonesias power market. It provides historical and forecast numbers for generation, capacity up to 2020 with key opportunities and major challenges in power market.GDP, population and consumption growth trend till 2017 is also captured The research analyzes upcoming power projects, key import and export trends, regulatory frameworks and infrastructure for the market. This coupled with profiles of key market participants provides a comprehensive understanding of the markets competitive scenario.

Scope

Seven emerging countries namely, India, China, Russia, Brazil, South Africa, Mexico and Indonesia are covered in the report.
This report begins with an executive summary describing the current key growth trends in the power sector of key emerging economies.
Chapter three provides an introduction to the key emerging economies
Chapter four provides lists the key opportunities and challenges
Chapter five provides a comparison of the key emerging economies, on the basis of their prevailing macroeconomic trends, power supply security, future development potential and regulatory frameworks.
Chapters six through 12 provide details of the market outlook, capacity and generation, government regulations, key opportunities and major challenges in the power sector of seven emerging countries: Brazil, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Russia, South Africa and China.

Reasons to buy

Facilitate decision-making based on strong historic and forecast data on the power sector of high growth countries
Develop strategies based on the latest power sector trends.
Position yourself to gain the maximum advantage from power generation growth potential.
Identify key partners and business development avenues.
Respond to your competitors business structure, strategy and prospects.

To Buy A Copy Of This Report Kindly Visit:

http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/analysis/155541

To Browse All Reports Kindly visit: http://www.marketresearchreports.biz/

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Power Markets in Emerging Economies – Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020

Posted on 20 December 2012 by Africa Business

NEW YORK, Dec., 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Power Markets in Emerging Economies – Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020

http://www.reportlinker.com/p01057650/Power-Markets-in-Emerging-Economies—Market-Outlook-Capacity-and-Generation-Opportunities-and-Challenges-to-2020.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=NoCategory

Power Markets in Emerging Economies – Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020

Summary

GlobalData’s report, “Power Markets in Emerging Economies – Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020″, gives detailed information on seven emerging countries, namely, India, China, Russia, Brazil, South Africa, Mexico and Indonesia’s power market. It provides historical and forecast numbers for generation, capacity up to 2020 with key opportunities and major challenges in power market.GDP, population and consumption growth trend till 2017 is also captured The research analyzes upcoming power projects, key import and export trends, regulatory frameworks and infrastructure for the market. This coupled with profiles of key market participants provides a comprehensive understanding of the market’s competitive scenario.

Scope

- Seven emerging countries namely, India, China, Russia, Brazil, South Africa, Mexico and Indonesia are covered in the report.

- This report begins with an executive summary describing the current key growth trends in the power sector of key emerging economies.

- Chapter three provides an introduction to the key emerging economies

- Chapter four provides lists the key opportunities and challenges

- Chapter five provides a comparison of the key emerging economies, on the basis of their prevailing macroeconomic trends, power supply security, future development potential and regulatory frameworks.

- Chapters six through 12 provide details of the market outlook, capacity and generation, government regulations, key opportunities and major challenges in the power sector of seven emerging countries: Brazil, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Russia, South Africa and China.

Reasons to buy

- Facilitate decision-making based on strong historic and forecast data on the power sector of high growth countries

- Develop strategies based on the latest power sector trends.

- Position yourself to gain the maximum advantage from power generation growth potential.

- Identify key partners and business development avenues.

- Respond to your competitors’ business structure, strategy and prospects.

1 Table of Contents

1 Table of Contents 4

1.1 List of Tables 6

1.2 List of Figures 9

2 Introduction to Emerging Economies 11

2.1 GlobalData Report Guidance 12

3 Power Market in Emerging Economies 13

3.1 Seven Emerging Countries Consitutes More than One-Third of the Global Power Consumption 13

3.2 Half of the Global Capacity Additions are Likely to be Contributed by Seven Emerging Countries by 2020 13

3.3 Key Opportunities in the Power Sector of Emerging Markets 14

3.4 Major Challenges in Power Sector of Emerging Markets 15

4 Power Market Comparison of Key Emerging Economies 16

4.1 China’s Power Sector Abounds in Opportunity 16

5 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, Brazil 20

5.1 Growing GDP and Developing Economy is Driving Electricity Consumption Growth 20

5.2 Clean Hydropower is the Dominant Generation Source in Brazil 22

5.3 Share of Renewable Energy Generation is Expected to Double by 2020 24

5.4 Renewable Energy Capacity is likely to become threefold by 2020 26

5.5 Thermal Power Acts as a Back-up Generation Source in Brazil 29

5.6 Brazil is a Net Importer of Electricity with Few Electricity Exports 31

5.7 Brazil Launched its First Power Exchange in 2011 32

5.8 Brazil Power Sector’s Key Regulations and Initiatives 33

5.9 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 36

5.10 Generation Infrastructure Overview 40

5.11 Key Opportunities in Brazil’s Power Market 46

5.12 Major Challenges in Brazil Power Market 48

5.13 Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras S.A. is the Leading Power Generation Company in Brazil 49

6 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, India 52

6.1 Growing Population and a Developing Economy Boost Electricity Consumption in India 52

6.2 Generation Capacity is Expected to Reach nearly 400 GW by 2020 54

6.3 Electricity Generation is likely to double by 2020 56

6.4 Nuclear Capacity is Expected to Increase more than Six Times by 2020 57

6.5 Thermal is the Dominant Contributor to India’s Capacity Mix 60

6.6 Bhutan is the Key Exporter of Electricity to India 62

6.7 Power Exchanges Constitutes Small Portion of Power Trading in India 63

6.8 Key Regulations and Initiatives by Indian Power Sector 64

6.9 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 72

6.10 Generation Infrastructure Overview 76

6.11 Key Opportunities in the Indian Power Sector 82

6.12 Major Challenges Faced by Power Sector in India 84

6.13 Leading Power Generation Companies in Indian Power Sector 86

7 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, Indonesia 88

7.1 Indonesia’s GDP and Electricity Consumption is likely to Continue its Growth Trend 88

7.2 Thermal Power is likely to Remain the Dominant Generation Source in Indonesia 90

7.3 Indonesia Faces Frequent Power Cuts 92

7.4 Geothermal is Expected to Become the Leading Non-conventional Generation Source in Indonesia 94

7.5 Coal is Expected to Form Half of the Total Installed Capacity by 2020 97

7.6 Indonesia is likely to Start Power Trading with Malaysia by 2014 99

7.7 Indonesia’s Key Regulations and Initiatives 100

7.8 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 102

7.9 Generation Infrastructure Overview 104

7.10 Key Opportunities in Indonesia’s Power Market 109

7.11 Major Challenges in Indonesia Power Market 110

7.12 PT PLN is the Leading Power Generation Company in Indonesia 112

8 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, Russia 114

8.1 Growth Trend likely to Continue for Russia’s GDP 114

8.2 Thermal Power likely to remain a Dominant Generation Source in Russia 116

8.3 No Major Change Expected in Russia’s Generation by 2020, Though Nuclear Will Play Increasing Role 118

8.4 Hydropower is the Major Non-Conventional Generation Source in Russia 120

8.5 Natural Gas is Key Power Generation Source in Russia 123

8.6 Russia, Net Exporter of Electricity 125

8.7 Russia, Key Regulations and Initiatives 126

8.8 Power Trading Mechanism in Russia 130

8.9 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 131

8.10 Generation Infrastructure Overview 134

8.11 Key Opportunities in Russia Power Market 140

8.12 Major Challenges in Russia’s Power Sector 142

8.13 Large Number of Generation Companies Operating in Russia 144

9 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, South Africa 148

9.1 Economic Growth and Increasing Electrification Ratio Likely to Increase Electricity Consumption 148

9.2 Thermal Power Constitutes more than 90% of Total Installed Capacity in South Africa 150

9.3 South Africa to Increase Power Generation to Meet Growing Demand 152

9.4 Renewable Energy Expected to Become the Largest Non-Conventional Power Generation Source in South Africa by 2020 154

9.5 Coal Power is a Key Generation Source in South Africa 157

9.6 South Africa, Net Importer of Electricity 159

9.7 South Africa, Key Regulations and Initiatives 160

9.8 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 163

9.9 Generation infrastructure overview 172

9.10 Key Opportunities in South Africa Power Market 177

9.11 Major Challenges in South Africa’s Power Sector 178

9.12 Eskom Holdings is the Leading Power Generation Company in South Africa 180

10 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, China 182

10.1 Continued Growth in GDP and Power Consumption 182

10.2 Thermal Power Likely to Remain the Dominant Source of Power in China 184

10.3 Power Outages in China 186

10.4 Robust Growth Expected for Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources 188

10.5 Coal to Remain the Key Power Generation Source in China 191

10.6 China, Net Exporter of Electricity 193

10.7 Majority of Power in China Traded Through Long Term Contracts 194

10.8 China, Key Regulations and Initiatives 194

10.9 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 198

10.10 Generation Infrastructure Overview 202

10.11 Key Opportunities in Power Sector 206

10.12 Major Challenges in China’s Power Sector 208

10.13 Numerous Generation Companies Active in China’s Power Market 209

11 Power Market in Key Emerging Economies, Mexico 212

11.1 GDP Growth Likely to Boost Electricity Consumption in Mexico 212

11.2 Thermal Power Sources Dominate Generation Capacity in Mexico 214

11.3 Increased Power Generation Likely to Boost Mexico’s Export Earnings 216

11.4 Wind Power Likely to Account for Half of Renewable Capacity by 2020 218

11.5 Low Natural Gas Prices to Boost Thermal Power Generation in Mexico 221

11.6 Mexico, Net Exporter of Electricity 223

11.7 CFE is Sole Buyer of Electricity in Mexico 224

11.8 Mexico, Key Regulations and Initiatives 224

11.9 Transmission and Distribution Infrastructure Overview 227

11.10 Generation Infrastructure Overview 230

11.11 Key Opportunities in Mexico’s Power Market 236

11.12 Major Challenges in Power Sector 238

11.13 Comisión Federal de Electricidad, Major Power Generating Company in Mexico 239

12 Appendix 241

12.1 Definitions 241

12.2 Abbreviations 242

12.3 Bibliography 245

12.4 GlobalData’s Methodology 248

12.5 Contact Us 249

12.6 Disclaimer 249

List of Tables

Table 1: Power Market, Emerging Countries, Macroeconomic Parameters, 2011 19

Table 2: Power Market, Emerging Countries, Power Supply Security Parameters, 2005-2011 (%) 20

Table 3: Power Market, Emerging Countries, Future Potential Parameters (%), 2012-2020 21

Table 4: Power Market, Brazil, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 23

Table 5: Power Market, Brazil, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 25

Table 6: Power Market, Brazil, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 27

Table 7: Power Market, Brazil, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Renewable Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 29

Table 8: Power Market, Brazil, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 32

Table 9: Power Market, Brazil, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 33

Table 10: Power Market, Brazil, Transmission Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 39

Table 11: Power Market, Brazil, Distribution Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 40

Table 12: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Active Thermal Power Projects, 2011 42

Table 13: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Active Hydropower Projects, 2011 43

Table 14: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Active Nuclear Power Projects, 2011 43

Table 15: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Active Renewable Power Projects, 2011 44

Table 16: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Upcoming Thermal Power Projects, 2011 45

Table 17: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Upcoming Hydropower Projects, 2011 46

Table 18: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Upcoming Nuclear Power Project, 2011 46

Table 19: Power Market, Brazil, Leading Upcoming Renewable Power Projects, 2011 47

Table 20: Power Market, Brazil, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 51

Table 21: Power Market, India, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Millions) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 55

Table 22: Power Market, India, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 57

Table 23: Power Market, India, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 58

Table 24: Power Market, India, Cumulative Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 61

Table 25: Power Market, India, Cumulative Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 63

Table 26: Power Market, India, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2009 65

Table 27: Power Market, India, RPS Specified by SERCs, 2010-2013 71

Table 28: Power Market, India, Scope of Electricity Grids 74

Table 29: Power Market, India, Transmission Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 76

Table 30: Power Market, India, Distribution Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 77

Table 31: Power Market, India, Leading Active Thermal Power Plants, 2011 78

Table 32: Power Market, India, Leading Active Hydropower Plants, 2011 79

Table 33: Power Market, India, Leading Active Nuclear Power Plants, 2011 79

Table 34: Power Market, India, Leading Active Renewable Power Plants, 2011 80

Table 35: Power Market, India, Leading Thermal Power Plants, 2012-2020 81

Table 36: Power Market, India, Leading Hydropower Plants, 2012-2020 82

Table 37: Power Market, India, Leading Nuclear Power Plants, 2012-2020 82

Table 38: Power Market, India, Leading Renewable Power Plants, 2012-2020 83

Table 39: Power Market, India, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 88

Table 40: Power Market, Indonesia, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 91

Table 41: Power Market, Indonesia, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 93

Table 42: Power Market, Indonesia, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 95

Table 43: Power Market, Indonesia, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 98

Table 44: Power Market, Indonesia, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 100

Table 45: Power Market, Indonesia, Transmission Line Length (Ckm), 2005-2020 104

Table 46: Power Market, Indonesia, Distribution Network, Length (Ckm), 2005-2020 105

Table 47: Power Market, Indonesia, Leading Active Thermal Power Projects, 2011 106

Table 48: Power Market, Indonesia, Leading Active Hydro Power Projects 107

Table 49: Power Market, Indonesia, Leading Active Renewable Power Projects, 2011 107

Table 50: Power Market, Indonesia, Leading Upcoming Thermal Power Projects, 2011 108

Table 51: Power Market, Indonesia, Leading Upcoming Hydropower Projects, 2011 109

Table 52: Power Market, Indonesia, Leading Upcoming Renewable Power Projects, 2011 110

Table 53: Power Market, Indonesia, Installed Capacity Share of Major Power Companies (%), 2011 114

Table 54: Power Market, Russia, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 117

Table 55: Power Market, Russia, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 119

Table 56: Power Market, Russia, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 121

Table 57: Power Market, Russia, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 124

Table 58: Power Market, Russia, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 126

Table 59: Power Market, Russia, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 127

Table 60: Power Market, Russia, Length of Transmission Lines (Ckm), 2005-2020 133

Table 61: Power Market, Russia, Distribution Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 134

Table 62: Power Market, Russia, Leading Thermal Power Projects (MW), 2011 136

Table 63: Power Market, Russia, Leading Hydropower Projects (MW), 2011 137

Table 64: Power Market, Russia, Leading Nuclear Power Projects (MW), 2011 137

Table 65: Power Market, Russia, Leading Active Renewable Power Projects, 2011 138

Table 66: Power Market, Russia, Leading Upcoming Thermal Projects, 2011 139

Table 67: Power Market, Russia, Leading Upcoming Hydropower Projects, 2011 140

Table 68: Power Market, Russia, Leading Upcoming Nuclear Power Projects, 2011 140

Table 69: Power Market, Russia, Leading Upcoming Renewable Projects, 2011 141

Table 70: Power Market, Russia, Installed Capacity Share of Major Power Companies (%), 2011 146

Table 71: Power Market, South Africa, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 151

Table 72: Power Market, South Africa, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 153

Table 73: Power Market, South Africa, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 155

Table 74: Power Market, South Africa, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 158

Table 75: Power Market, South Africa, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 160

Table 76: Power Market, South Africa, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 161

Table 77: Power Market, South Africa, Transmission Development Plan, 2011-2021 165

Table 78: Power Market, South Africa, Northern Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 166

Table 79: Power Market, South Africa, North East Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 166

Table 80: Power Market, South Africa, Central Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 167

Table 81: Power Market, South Africa, North West Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 167

Table 82: Power Market, South Africa, Eastern Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 168

Table 83: Power Market, South Africa, Southern Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 168

Table 84: Power Market, South Africa, Western Grid Major New Assets, 2012-2021 169

Table 85: Power Market, South Africa, Length of Transmission Lines (Ckm), 2005-2020 170

Table 86: Power Market, South Africa, Distribution Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 171

Table 87: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Thermal Power Projects (MW), 2011 174

Table 88: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Hydropower Projects (MW), 2011 175

Table 89: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Nuclear Commercial Reactors (MW), 2011 175

Table 90: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Active Renewable Power Projects, 2011 176

Table 91: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Upcoming Thermal Projects, 2011 177

Table 92: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Upcoming Hydropower Projects, 2011 177

Table 93: Power Market, South Africa, Leading Upcoming Renewable Projects, 2011 178

Table 94: Power Market, South Africa, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 182

Table 95: Power Market, China, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 185

Table 96: Power Market, China, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 187

Table 97: Power Market, China, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 189

Table 98: Power Market, China, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Renewable Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 192

Table 99: Power Market, China, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 194

Table 100: Power Market, China, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 195

Table 101: Power Market, China, Status of UHV DC Projects, 2012 200

Table 102: Power Market, China, Transmission Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 201

Table 103: Power Market, China, Distribution Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 202

Table 104: Power Market, China, Leading Active Thermal Power Projects, 2011 204

Table 105: Power Market, China, Leading Active Hydropower Projects, 2011 205

Table 106: Power Market, China, Leading Active Nuclear Power Projects, 2011 206

Table 107: Power Market, China, Leading Upcoming Renewable Projects, 2011 207

Table 108: Power Market, China, Installed Capacity Share of Major Power Generation Companies (%), 2010 211

Table 109: Power Market, Mexico, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 215

Table 110: Power Market, Mexico, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 217

Table 111: Power Market, Mexico, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 219

Table 112: Power Market, Mexico, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 221

Table 113: Power Market, Mexico, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 224

Table 114: Power Market, Mexico, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 225

Table 115: Power Market, Mexico, Transmission Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 229

Table 116: Power Market, Mexico, Distribution Line Lengths (Ckm), 2005-2020 230

Table 117: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Thermal Power Projects (MW) 232

Table 118: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Hydropower Projects (MW), 2011 233

Table 119: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Nuclear Power Projects (MW) 233

Table 120: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Renewable Power Projects (MW) 234

Table 121: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Thermal Power Projects (MW) 235

Table 122: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Upcoming Hydropower Projects (MW) 236

Table 123: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Nuclear Power Projects (MW) 236

Table 124: Power Market, Mexico, Leading Active Renewable Power Projects (MW) 237

Table 125: Power Market, Mexico, Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 241

Table 126: Abbreviations 244

List of Figures

Figure 1: Power Market, Key Emerging Countries 13

Figure 2: Power Market, Emerging Countries, Share of Electricity Consumption (%), 2011 and 2020 15

Figure 3: Power Market, Emerging Countries, Share of Installed Capacity (%), 2011 and 2020 15

Figure 4: Power Market, Emerging Countries, Comparative Analysis, 2011 18

Figure 5: Power Market, Brazil, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 23

Figure 6: Power Market, Brazil, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 24

Figure 7: Power Market, Brazil, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 26

Figure 8: Power Market, Brazil, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 29

Figure 9: Power Market, Brazil, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 31

Figure 10: Power Market, Brazil, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 33

Figure 11: Power Market, Structure of Electricity Sale in Brazil 38

Figure 12: Power Market, Brazil, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 51

Figure 13: Power Market, India, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 54

Figure 14: Power Market, India, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 56

Figure 15: Power Market, India, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 58

Figure 16: Power Market, India, Cumulative Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 60

Figure 17: Power Market, India, Cumulative Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 62

Figure 18: Power Market, India, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2009 64

Figure 19: Power Market, India, Prospects for Electricity Trade Amongst Four Countries in South Asia 75

Figure 20: Power Market, India, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 88

Figure 21: Power Market, Indonesia, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 90

Figure 22: Power Market, Indonesia, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 92

Figure 23: Power Market, Indonesia, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 94

Figure 24: Power Market, Indonesia, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 97

Figure 25: Power Market, Indonesia, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 99

Figure 26: Power Market, Indonesia, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 114

Figure 27: Power Market, Russia, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 116

Figure 28: Power Market, Russia, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 118

Figure 29: Power Market, Russia, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 120

Figure 30: Power Market, Russia, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 123

Figure 31: Power Market, Russia, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 125

Figure 32: Power Market, Russia, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 127

Figure 33: Power Market, Russia, Layout of Price and Non-Price Zones 129

Figure 34: Power Market, Russia, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 146

Figure 35: Power Market, South Africa, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 151

Figure 36: Power Market, South Africa, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 152

Figure 37: Power Market, South Africa, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 154

Figure 38: Power Market, South Africa, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 157

Figure 39: Power Market, South Africa, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 159

Figure 40: Power Market, South Africa, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 161

Figure 41: Power Market, South Africa, Infrastructure, 2011 172

Figure 42: Power Market, South Africa, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 182

Figure 43: Power Market, China, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 184

Figure 44: Power Market, China, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 186

Figure 45: Power Market, China, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 188

Figure 46: Power Market, China, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 191

Figure 47: Power Market, China, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 193

Figure 48: Power Market, China, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 195

Figure 49: Power Market, China, Estimated Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 211

Figure 50: Power Market, Mexico, Trends in GDP ($bn), Population (Million Units) and Electricity Consumption (GWh), 2005-2017 214

Figure 51: Power Market, Mexico, Cumulative Installed Capacity (MW), 2005-2020 216

Figure 52: Power Market, Mexico, Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 218

Figure 53: Power Market, Mexico, Renewable Installed Capacity (MW) and Annual Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 221

Figure 54: Power Market, Mexico, Thermal Installed Capacity (MW) and Thermal Power Generation (GWh), 2005-2020 224

Figure 55: Power Market, Mexico, Total Annual Imports and Exports (GWh), 2005-2010 225

Figure 56: Power Market, Mexico, Market Share of Major Power Companies by Installed Capacity (%), 2011 241

To order this report:

: Power Markets in Emerging Economies – Market Outlook, Capacity and Generation, Opportunities and Challenges to 2020

Contact Nicolas: nicolasbombourg@reportlinker.com
US: (805)-652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626

SOURCE Reportlinker

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