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Sarama Resources Continues to Consolidate its Position at the South Houndé Project in Burkina Faso

Posted on 15 May 2013 by Africa Business

TSX-V Ticker: SWA
SWA.WT

VANCOUVER, May 15, 2013 /PRNewswire/ – Sarama Resources Limited (“Sarama” or the “Company“) is pleased to report that it has been granted three new exploration permits in Burkina Faso, including one adjacent to the Company’s flagship South Houndé Project, which brings the Company’s exploration landholding in this prospective region to 1,014km².

Highlights

  • Three new exploration permits totalling 240km² granted, expanding Sarama’s total exploration land package in Burkina Faso to 3,339km².
  • The grant of a 127km² exploration permit adjacent to Sarama’s Tankoro exploration property, provides Sarama a commanding presence in the geologically prospective Houndé Belt, with a total landholding of 1,014km².
  • The grant of the Youngou Est and Nianie exploration permits complements Sarama’s existing Youngou exploration property, which borders the Youga mine of Endeavour Mining Corp in the central south of Burkina Faso, bringing the Company’s total landholding in the project area to 363km².
  • Reconnaissance exploration programs to commence in second half of 2013.

Grant of Bini Exploration Permit

Sarama has been granted new exploration permits for the Bini, Youngou Est and Nianie properties by the Ministry of Mines and Energy, bringing the Company’s total exploration property interests in Burkina Faso to 3,339km² (refer Figure 1).

The 127km² Bini exploration property (“Bini“) further consolidates Sarama’s position in the highly prospective Houndé Belt, which hosts the 7.8Moz, 170koz per annum Mana gold mine of Semafo Inc and the 2.2Moz Houndé gold project of Endeavour Mining Corp.  Bini is located centrally within the belt and is adjacent to Sarama’s Tankoro exploration property where the Company has intersected significant gold mineralisation over a 1.9km strike length at the MM Prospect (refer Figure 2).

The property is underlain by a sequence of meta-sedimentary and volcanic rocks and is interpreted to contain north-north-east trending structures, which are thought to be one of the controls on the mineralisation encountered at the Company’s MM Prospect.  Sarama anticipates commencing first-pass reconnaissance exploration activities on the property in the second half of 2013.

The exploration permit gives Sarama the exclusive right to explore for gold and associated minerals during an initial term of 3 years.  Subject to certain statutory obligations being met, the permit is renewable for a further two 3-year terms, after which time, the permit will be eligible for conversion to an exploitation permit.

Figure 1:    Sarama’s Exploration Properties in Burkina Faso

Figure 2:    Sarama’s Exploration Properties in South-West Burkina Faso

Grant of Youngou Est and Nianie Exploration Permits

The Youngou Est and Nianie exploration properties, covering areas of 95km² and 18km² respectively, lie in the extreme south of central Burkina Faso (Figure 3).  Being proximal to Sarama’s existing Youngou exploration property, the permit grants bring Sarama’s landholding in the project area to 363km².

The properties are underlain by volcano-sedimentary and gneissic rocks with the prospective sequence arranged along a north-east striking trend bounded by granite.  The 90,000oz per annum Youga gold mine of  Endeavour Mining Corp is located immediately adjacent to Sarama’s property group and within the same lithological sequence, illustrating the prospectivity of the region.

Sarama anticipates commencing reconnaissance exploration activities on the recently granted properties in the second half of 2013.

The exploration permits give Sarama the exclusive right to explore for gold and associated minerals during an initial term of 3 years.  Subject to certain statutory obligations being met, the permit is renewable for a further two 3-year terms, after which time, the permit will be eligible for conversion to an exploitation permit.

Figure 3:    Sarama’s Exploration Properties in Central South Burkina Faso

Sarama’s President and CEO, Andrew Dinning commented:

“We are pleased to have been granted these new permits in two of our existing project areas.  Our position at the South Houndé Project continues to strengthen with the addition of the Bini property and we look forward to commencing our reconnaissance exploration programs in the upcoming exploration season.

Sarama is well funded with a cash balance of approximately US$11M at the end of March 2013 and is currently finalising regional exploration programs in the south of the MM Prospect which are expected to contribute to the maiden resource estimate planned for Q3 2013.”

For further information on the Company’s activities, please contact:

Andrew Dinning or Paul Schmiede
email:  info@saramaresources.com
telephone: +61 8 9363 7600

About Sarama Resources Ltd
Sarama Resources Ltd is a Canadian company with a focus on the exploration and development of gold deposits in West Africa.  The board of directors and management team, a majority of whom are founders of the Company, are seasoned resource industry professionals with extensive experience in the exploration and development of world-class gold projects in Africa.

The South Houndé Project in south-west Burkina Faso is the Company’s flagship property and is currently the focus of an aggressive exploration program to increase the size of its maiden discovery and to test gold-in-soil anomalies located in a 30km-long structural corridor.  Recent drilling programs at the South Houndé Project have intersected significant mineralisation in several prospect areas which the Company is actively following up.  The Company has built substantial early-stage exploration landholdings in prospective and underexplored areas of Burkina Faso (>3,300 km²), Liberia (>880 km²) and Mali (>560 km²) and is aggressively exploring across the property portfolio.

Caution Regarding Forward Looking Statements
Information in this news release that is not a statement of historical fact constitutes forward-looking information.  Such forward-looking information includes statements regarding the Company’s planned exploration programs.  Actual results, performance or achievements of the Company may vary from the results suggested by such forward-looking statements due to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors. Such factors include, among others, that the business of exploration for gold and other precious minerals involves a high degree of risk and is highly speculative in nature; few properties that are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines; geological factors; the actual results of current and future exploration; changes in project parameters as plans continue to be evaluated, as well as those factors disclosed in the Company’s publicly filed documents.

There can be no assurance that any mineralisation that is discovered will be proven to be economic, or that future required regulatory licensing or approvals will be obtained. However, the Company believes that the assumptions and expectations reflected in the forward-looking information are reasonable. Assumptions have been made regarding, among other things, the Company’s ability to carry on its exploration activities, the sufficiency of funding, the timely receipt of required approvals, the price of gold and other precious metals, that the Company will not be affected by adverse political events, the ability of the Company to operate in a safe, efficient and effective manner and the ability of the Company to obtain further financing as and when required and on reasonable terms. Readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking information.

Sarama does not undertake to update any forward-looking information, except as required by applicable laws.

Qualified Person’s Statement

Scientific or technical information in this news release that relates to the Company’s exploration activities in Burkina Faso is based on information compiled or approved by Michel Mercier Michel Mercier is an employee of Sarama Resources Ltd and is a member in good standing of the Ordre des Géologues du Québec and has sufficient experience which is relevant to the commodity, style of mineralisation under consideration and activity which he is undertaking to qualify as a Qualified Person under National Instrument 43-101.  Michel Mercier consents to the inclusion in this report of the information, in the form and context in which it appears.

Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

SOURCE Sarama Resources Limited

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PANGOLIN DIAMONDS DISCOVERS ITS FIRST KIMBERLITE IN BOTSWANA

Posted on 15 May 2013 by Africa Business

About the Tsabong North Project

The Tsabong North Project, located approximately 100 km north of the town of Tsabong in south-western Botswana, is 1,545 km2 in size. It is comprised of anomalous concentrations of kimberlite indicators and has large geo-botanical features. Pangolin has already identified more than 50 drill-ready aeromagnetic targets in the Project area, several of which have surface areas exceeding 20 hectares. Exploration activities in the area are guided in part by the recommendations of a National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report prepared for the Project.

The Tsabong North Project is situated on the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton, immediately north of the diamondiferous Tsabong kimberlite field that hosts the M1 Kimberlite, the largest known diamondiferous kimberlite pipe in the world (www.firestonediamonds.com). Pangolin’s Chairman, Dr. Leon Daniels, was part of the Falconbridge Team that developed the geological model of the 180 hectare M1 Kimberlite that was discovered in 1978. He was also directly involved in the discovery of several new kimberlites in the Tsabong kimberlite field.

Pangolin’s soil sampling has produced highly anomalous concentrations of kimberlite indicators within the Tsabong North Project area. Microprobe analyses of indicator minerals have confirmed the presence of G10 garnets, indicating the presence of a mantle conducive to the crystallization of diamonds. A number of indicators occur, including remnants of kelyphite that indicate close proximity to kimberlite. Enzyme-leach trace element results are consistent with orientation trace element results over known kimberlites near the Project.

About Pangolin Diamonds Corp

Pangolin Diamonds Corp. is building a leading diamond exploration and development company in the heart of Botswana, the world’s leading diamond producing country by value. The Company is the 100% owner of 11 Prospecting Licenses covering 5,307 km2, including the Tsabong North, Jwaneng South, Malatswae and Mmadinare Projects. Pangolin’s management and team leaders have over 90 years of combined diamond exploration experience in southern Africa. This makes the Company the most experienced diamond explorer in Botswana other than De Beers Exploration and Debswana. The Company is equipped for exploration, with two diamond drill rigs and a fully portable one-tonne per hour Dense Media Separation Plant used to prepare samples and make diamond concentrates. Pangolin is well-funded to continue its exploration programs for the next year.

 

·         Kimberlite discovered at Tsabong North Project has a +20 hectare aeromagnetic anomaly associated with it

·         Two additional diamond drill core holes will be completed to intersect a minimum of 100 meters of kimberlite

·         Additional undrilled kimberlite targets in the project area have the same magnetic signature

TORONTO, ONTARIO (May 15, 2013) – Pangolin Diamonds Corp. (TSX-V: PAN) (the “Company” or “Pangolin”) is pleased to announce it has discovered its first kimberlite at its 100% owned Tsabong North Project in Botswana. Core logging identified crater facies sediments and underlying reworked volcaniclastic kimberlite (“RVK”) breccias in drill hole “Magi-01/1”.

Representative rock samples were submitted for independent whole rock analysis to Activation Laboratories Ltd., in Ancaster (Ontario). The results assisted in discriminating between the kimberlite crater facies sediments and the overlying Kalahari Formation. Crater facies sediments are present from a depth of 33.5 meters to 58.8 meters below which RVK breccia occurs to 76.3 meters. The crater facies sediments and RVK breccias intersected are consistent with the equivalent lithological units observed in the core of drill hole M1/50 from the M1 Kimberlite in the Tsabong Kimberlite Field which was drilled in 1981.

Dr Leon Daniels, B.Sc., Ph.D., Chairman of the Board of Pangolin, stated: “We are very pleased with Pangolin’s success to date, as we have now graduated from an explorer to a discoverer and are determined to continue on this course.”

The 45 mantle-derived indicator garnets, inclusive of some high pressure garnets previously announced on March 26, 2013, were liberated from a core sample in Magi-01/1 taken at a depth of 22 meters below the surface. A split of the available core will now be processed through a mini-Dense Media Separation Plant to recover any additional kimberlite indicator minerals, such as garnets, and/or macro diamonds from the kimberlite intersected section.

Based on these positive results, two additional diamond drill holes intersecting at least 100 meters of kimberlite will be drilled on the Magi-01 kimberlite for kimberlite indicator mineral and microdiamond recovery. The Company has also elevated additional previously identified kimberlite targets in the project area to targets of high immediate interest with similar magnetic signatures to Magi-01/1.

The photos below compare the various kimberlite crater facies sediments (A1, A2) and RVK breccias (B1, B2) from Pangolin’s core drill hole Magi-01/1 (to the left) versus those from drill hole M1/50 from the M1 Kimberlite Pipe (to the right).

The technical disclosure in this news release has been reviewed and approved by Dr. Leon Daniels, Ph.D., Member of AIG, Chairman of the Board of Pangolin, and a Qualified Person under National Instrument 43-101 rules.

Source: www.pangolindiamondscorp.com

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What Is Needed for Sustainable Energy for Africa?

Posted on 09 May 2013 by Africa Business

18 – 20 FEBRUARY 2014 | SANDTON CONVENTION CENTRE |

JOHANNESBURG SOUTH AFRICA | WWW.ENERGYINDABA.CO.ZA

AFRICA ENERGY INDABA APRIL 2013

What Is Needed for Sustainable Energy for Africa?

The African Development Bank is at the forefront of initiatives aimed at providing energy access, and providing energy availability to Africans.  The Bank’s Southern African Director; Dr Ebrahim Faal delivered a presentation at the 2013 Africa Energy Indaba in February 2013 along these lines.  He looked at Africa’s energy landscape and presented the topic, “Towards Providing Sustainable Energy in Africa”.  In this newsletter, we take a look at the important issues covered in his presentation.

While Africa has plenty of energy resources, its energy statistics are not good.  Eighty-percent of the world’s population without electricity lives in rural Sub-Saharan Africa where per capita consumption is only 124KW per year.  Ninety-three percent of Africa’s hydropower potential is untapped and less than 10% of Africa’s hydro-electric power potential has been exploited. Africa also has the highest solar irradiation in the world.

Access to energy is critical to economic growth and development, and is the key to the achievement of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs).  While two thirds of African economies are expected to grow around 6.2% this year, which is still below the 7% needed to make a sizeable dent in poverty levels, it is nevertheless remarkable.   Greater access to energy is needed in order for economies to grow at levels beyond 6.2% up to 7%.  Sustainable economic growth in Africa can only be realised through greater provision of energy access and availability.  If MDG related targets are to be met by 2015, access to energy needs to rise from the present low levels of 27%, to 64%. Dr Faal identified a number of key initiatives that need to be done in order to ensure a supply of sustainable energy in the African continent. These included:

· Governments in Africa need to enact energy policies that will produce reforms in the energy sector with regard to cost reflective tariffs that support vulnerable customers.

· The promotion of regional integration through NEPAD.

· The private sector needs to play an increasing role in energy infrastructure development.

· International finance institutions need to mobilise financial support;

· Implementation partnerships need to be crafted across development partners, governments, regions, between South-South, and between public & private sectors in order to accelerate and upgrade Africa’s infrastructure delivery.

Current African Development Bank projects include the following outcomes:

· Distributing electricity solutions in a number of rural electrification projects in Burkina Faso, Guinea and DRC.

· Working within some low-income countries in scaling gap renewable energy within the framework of climate investment funds, plus within the UN’s ‘Co-generation for Africa’ project.

· Projects for improving grid infrastructure and supply efficiency in on-going regional transmission projects, in Sierra Leone, Cote d’Ivoire, Liberia, and Guinea, which will connect fragile states through to the other countries in the West Africa Power Pool and lay the foundation of leveraging the HEP potential of Guinea.

· Facilitation work that includes institutional capacity building and development of policy and regulatory frameworks for enhanced regional collaboration.

· Involvement in large-scale renewable energy projects, for example Inga HEP project in the DRC, and concentrated solar power 500 MW plant in Morocco, as well as wind and energy projects.

· Engaging with clients in energy planning and policies; the ADB has a wealth of experience in advisory services, and as such provides guidance and support in issues such as reforming regulatory frameworks, improving governance and creating an enabling environment for private sector development

· Developing innovative financial instruments to meet specific African challenges. For example in 2011 established a SEF [Sustainable Energy Fund] for Africa that provides SME’s in the energy sector with project preparation grants and growth capital through private equity vehicles. Another innovative instrument in the pipeline is the mobilisation of additional finance from sources such as African Central Bank Reserves, African Pension Funds, the African Diaspora, and high net worth individuals on the continent.

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“Merchants are the key to drive increased consumer transactions.”

Posted on 13 April 2013 by Africa Business

Exclusive interview with Peter Ollikainen, SVP Product Marketing, Mistral Mobile – brand sponsors at the upcoming Mobile Money Africa in
Johannesburg from 27-30 May.

1) Can you give us some background of Mistral Mobile’s business interests in mobile money in Africa?

Africa being the booming area and opportunity space for anything mobile makes it a natural attraction to play in the mobile fintech space. Our company’s legacy lies within Nokia, within Nokia’s Mobile Financial Services business. We were running the business in Nokia and when Nokia decided to exit the mobile financial services domain, we decided to establish our own company. During the Nokia times we were very focused on the emerging markets in general so we have continued on that route with Mistral Mobile as well. We have always felt the mobile financial services industry offers vast potential to do both good for the people in general as well as create a commercial success. We see great opportunity for both in Africa.

2) Which countries do you particularly see as having great potential?

Naturally there are markets where there is a lot going on, such as Nigeria, Uganda and Kenya but then some countries where the mobile financial services are less developed are attractive exactly because of not yet having established solutions.

3) What makes Mistral Mobile competitive in this market?
Our core product Money Mobility Suite allows the financial service to reach all the consumers in the market, independent of their mobile subscriptions and provides very high level of configurability allowing it to be used for wide range of mobilized verticals within the financial industry, and especially providing mobile-based solutions for the agents and merchants and allowing single solution to be used as the mobile front-end for different actors in the ecosystem. We’ve learned in practice how important it is to enable the full ecosystem and not just the consumers.

4) Any specific projects you are very excited about?
All of the ones we are currently working on! This is an exciting industry evolving very rapidly.

5) What are the challenges to implementing mobile money services in Africa?
Some challenges may be due to distribution ie reach of the agent networks to allow servicing large number of potential customers, hurdles being on the required agent servicing tools (e.g. need a PC or POS terminal, or lacking good servicing tools) and cash management side (eg. needs to be close to bank branch).

Then some challenges naturally also come from how to provide the access to the consumers through their own mobiles. There are more and more people who have featurephones and smartphones (esp Android phones) which allow using applications, but then the availability or costs of mobile data may be limiting the potential to use traditional application-based approach.

Also the consumer education in general is always a very important topic. Perhaps sometimes a model where instead of expecting consumer to make the leap and start using all the mobile money services themselves with their mobiles, the model where agent provides the servicing for them as over-the-counter services would work better to drive adoption. We are focusing on solving these problems and enabling best solutions to drive the adoption.

6) What is your vision for the industry?
Everyone will have a personalized financial services experience through their mobiles. As payment instruments, cash will not go away any time soon and there will be increasing number of cards being used. Bank branches will continue to exists, but an increasing number of banking and mobile money agents will be the physical customer servicing points for the people. Mobile will be an integral part of the payment instrument and customer servicing mix; not totally displacing any of the current ones but being complementary and in many cases the preferred way to manage one’s finances.

7) What surprises you about the industry?
Not necessarily any surprises as such, as the industry is evolving and there a lot of things being tried and tested and iterated so you have to always assume there is lot of new type of things going on. Maybe the only point could be that there has not been really a major disruptive innovation as such – the mobile money as a concept itself has been the disruptor in the financial services industry but beyond that a lot of things are iterative and evolutionary.

8)    What will be Mistral Mobile’s message at Mobile Money Africa?
The focus on driving further success should emphasis better solutions for agent networks and merchant enablement. Building a strong ecosystem as a machinery to drive and support much larger user bases and user transactions. Agents are the frontline face of the service towards the customers so that the machinery should work very smoothly. Merchants then are the key to drive increased consumer transactions – transitioning merchants from cash to mobile payment instruments is not easy but it’s a prerequisite to start driving transaction volumes and value to a different level.

9)    Anything you would like to add?
Come and meet us at Johannesburg at the Mobile Money Africa event! And before that make sure to visit us at www.mistralmobile.com and see the various solutions we are providing.

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IMF Concludes Fifth PSI Review Mission to Senegal

Posted on 10 April 2013 by Africa Business

An International Monetary Fund (IMF) mission led by Hervé Joly visited Senegal during March 27-April 10, 2013 to conduct the fifth review under the three-year Policy Support Instrument (PSI) approved in December 2010. The members of the mission met with the President of the Republic, the Prime Minister, the ministers of economy and finance, and energy; representatives of the Central Bank of West African States (BCEAO); other senior government officials; and representatives of the private sector, civil society, and the development partners.

At the conclusion of the visit, M. Joly issued the following statement:

“Recent macroeconomic developments were broadly in line with the projections made in fall 2012. Growth reached 3.5 percent in 2012 (from 2.1 percent in 2011), fueled by strong performance in the agricultural sector. Inflation has been moderate, with a 1.4 percent consumer price increase in 2012. External trade was marked by a deterioration in the current account deficit which exceeded 10 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2012, driven largely by increases in imports of petroleum and food products. Credit to the economy increased by about 10 percent, while growth of the money supply was contained.

“Notwithstanding the sluggish international environment, GDP growth is expected to tick up to 4 percent in 2013. Inflation should remain below 2 percent. The current account deficit is expected to improve.

“Program implementation was satisfactory overall. All quantitative assessment criteria and indicative targets for the program at end-2012 were met, except for the indicative target on single tendering owing to emergency procurement associated with the floods and preparation for the 2012/2013 crop year. For the first time in the last few years, the annual fiscal deficit target was met despite significant revenue shortfalls (deficit of 5.9 percent of GDP). Progress was made with the implementation of structural reforms, notably with the entry into force of the new general tax code on January 1, 2013.

“The discussions between the authorities and the mission focused on efforts to reduce the fiscal deficit, which remains a priority objective for the authorities in order to maintain debt sustainability and rebuild fiscal space. Since the last review, the fiscal outlook has been affected by tax-revenue shortfalls and new spending pressures, largely reflecting the situation in the energy sector. These developments should be matched by additional efforts to increase fiscal revenues and savings on certain expenditures. Overall, however, deficit reduction will be slightly lower than expected in 2013, to allow for nonrecurrent expenditures associated with the security situation in Mali and the Sahel, and the launching of the program in response to the major flooding of 2012. Nevertheless, the authorities reaffirmed their objective to reduce the deficit to less than 4 percent of GDP by 2015.

“The mission expressed its concern regarding the situation in the energy sector. Energy price subsidies (electricity and petroleum products) cost Senegalese taxpayers more than CFAF 160 billion in 2012 and would remain high in 2013. The mission believes that this burden is difficult to bear for public finances and to justify, given that only a small share of these subsidies benefit the poor. Consequently, the mission encouraged the authorities to phase out these subsidies and replace them with better-targeted social protections. A long-term reduction in electricity subsidies will require bringing online power stations that use more efficient and less expensive technologies, as well as substantial efficiency improvements at SENELEC. Accordingly, the mission encouraged the authorities to accelerate the implementation of their energy sector reform strategy.

The IMF’s Executive Board is expected to take up the fifth program review in June 2013.”

Source: IMF

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NEW SEED LEGISLATION SPELLS DISASTER FOR SMALL FARMERS IN AFRICA

Posted on 08 April 2013 by Wallace Mawire

Civil society organisations from the SADC region, and around the world have condemned the SADC draft Protocol for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (Plant Breeders’ Rights) as spelling disaster for small farmers and food security in the region. These groups, representing millions of farmers in Africa and around the world have submitted their concerns to the SADC Secretariat. They are calling for the rejection of the Protocol and urgent consultations with farmers, farmer movements and civil society before it’s too late.

According to the groups, the Protocol is inflexible, restrictive and imposes a “one-size-fits-all” plant variety protection (PVP) system on all SADC countries irrespective of the nature of agricultural systems, social and economic development. It is modelled after the 1991 International Convention for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV 1991), an instrument which was developed by industrialized countries to address their own needs.  UPOV 1991 grants extremely strong intellectual property right protection to plant breeders, and disallows farmers from continuing their customary practices of freely using, exchanging and selling farm-saved seeds.

According to Moses Shaha, regional chairman for the East and Southern African small-scale Farmers’ Forum (ESAFF): “The proposed legislation gives big-business breeders significant rights, but in doing so, disregards and marginalizes small farmers and their plant varieties. It fails to recognize that small-scale farmers and their customary practices of freely exchanging and re-using seed for multiple purposes, constitute the backbone of SADC’s agricultural farming systems.”

About half of SADC members are Least Developed Countries (LDCs) and are not currently under any international obligation to put in place any such PVP system. Indeed, the majority of SADC members have limited or no experience with PVP systems, or the impact these systems will have on food security, farmers, farming systems and livelihoods in the region.

According to Elizabeth Mpofu, a small farmer from Zimbabwe: “Small farmers in Africa play a vital role in keeping food costs down, and contribute immensely to the development of locally appropriate and adapted seeds, and to the diversity of crops. Any PVP system that fails to support and promote these farmer managed systems, and instead adversely impacts on them, is clearly a recipe for disaster for the region’s farmers.”

Like UPOV 1991, the Protocol is severely lacking in flexibilities to allow vulnerable states to address their particular socio-economic problems. The Protocol imposes a “one grant system” whereby the SADC Plant Breeders’ Rights Office will have the full authority to grant and administer breeders’ rights on behalf of all SADC members. “This top-down approach effectively undermines the rights of SADC member states to take any decision related to the protected plant varieties; decisions that are at the very core of national socio-economic development and poverty reduction strategiesThe Protocol also does not contain concrete measures to prevent misappropriation of plant genetic resources and does not live up to international commitments of the majority of SADC members to promote the sustainable use of plant genetic resources and plant breeding with the participation of farmers” pointed out Andrew Mushita, of the Community Trust for Development and Technology, in Zimbabwe.

“The whole rationale and underlying premise for the Protocol is unknown to us because we, as civil society, have been locked out of the process. What specific consultations have taken place, and with whom? What data and impact assessments have guided the development of the Protocol?” asks Mariam Mayet, of the African Centre for Biosafety.

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Pangolin’s Diamond Drilling in Botswana Returns 45 Mantle-Derived Indicator Garnets

Posted on 26 March 2013 by Africa Business

Pangolin Diamonds Corp. is building a leading diamond exploration and development company in the heart of Botswana, the world’s leading diamond producing country by value. The Company is the 100% owner of 11 Prospecting Licenses covering 5,307 km2, including the Tsabong North, Jwaneng South, Malatswae and Mmadinare Projects.

Pangolin’s management and team leaders have over 90 years of combined diamond exploration experience in Southern Africa. The Company is equipped for exploration, with two diamond drill rigs and a fully portable 1 tonne per hour Dense Media Separation Plant for sample preparation and making diamond concentrates.

 

  • High pressure garnets recovered include G9s, suggesting close proximity to a diamondiferous kimberlite pipe
  • Garnets intersected near surface, at a depth of 22 metres
  • Drilling location is near M-1, the worlds largest diamondiferous kimberlite pipe

TORONTO, ONTARIO (March 26, 2013) – Pangolin Diamonds Corp. (TSX.V: PAN) (the “Company” or “Pangolin”) is pleased to announce the first results from the Company’s initial drilling program at its Tsabong North Project in Botswana, Africa.

 

Independent lab analysis by Kelowna, B.C.-based CF Mineral Laboratories Inc. returned a significant number of high pressure garnets associated with the diamond stability field (the area of the Earth’s mantle with the heat and pressure required to produce diamonds). This confirms a high exploration potential for new diamondiferous kimberlite pipes in the Project area.

 

Microprobe analysis of a 568.5 gram core sample produced 45 confirmed, mantle-derived indicator garnets.

 

The diamond drill core barrel used is a TNW standard diameter producing a 61 mm diameter core and the hole was drilled vertically. The garnets were liberated from a core sample taken at a depth of 22 metres below the surface. The core sample came from a glauconitic fine grained sandstone interval that extends from a depth of 16.2 m to 33.5 m. This unit presented very high counts of garnet grains on visual inspection and the sample submitted was picked as representative of the intersection.

 

The drilling program is ongoing and the Company expects additional results soon. Additional drill core samples will be submitted to an independent laboratory in the coming weeks.

 

Dr. Leon Daniels, Chairman of Pangolin, stated, “Over my 30 years of diamond exploration in Botswana, I have never personally seen such a high concentration of garnets, including high pressure garnets, in a drill core sample area of this size. We are very encouraged by our early drill results at our Tsabong North Project.”

 

The population of garnets recovered from the drill core is akin to that of the DK2 kimberlite pipe in the Orapa kimberlite field found at the Letlhakane Mine (http://www.debeersgroup.com/Operations/Mining/Mining-Operations/Debswana/Letlhakane).

 

The garnet mineral chemistry graph on Pangolin’s website confirms the presence of a high pressure environment (go to www.pangolindiamondscorp.com/Tsabong.php to view the graph along with further details on the Tsabong North Project). The presence of high pressure G9 and G1 garnets, which have elsewhere been found associated with diamonds and diamondiferous xenoliths, together with the fresh surface textures of the observed garnets, suggest the proximity of a kimberlite which may be diamondiferous.

 

Pangolin’s current drill core results are comparable to the recovered G10 garnets from soil samples in the project area. This suggests there is more than one kimberlite source in the project area.

The technical disclosure in this news release has been reviewed and approved by Dr. Leon Daniels, B.Sc., Ph.D., Member of AIG, Chairman of the Board of Pangolin, and a Qualified Person under National Instrument 43-101 rules.

For more information on diamond mining in Botswana, go to: http://www.pangolindiamondscorp.com/about-botswana.php

 

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Pangolin Diamonds Corp. updates shareholders on 2013 kimberlite diamond exploration activities in Botswana

Posted on 25 March 2013 by Africa Business

About diamond mining in Botswana
Botswana is the largest diamond producing country in the world by value, supplying 21% of global rough diamond production. It is the location of the world’s two largest diamond mines, Jwaneng and Orapa, and four non-De Beers diamond mines – Gem, Firestone, Lucara and Mantle. Diamonds were first discovered in Botswana in 1959 and the first kimberlites were discovered in 1967. Since then, over 275 kimberlites have been discovered in the country. With a long and well-established Mining Code, Botswana is rated by the Fraser Institute as the best country in Africa for mining. The country has the highest sovereign credit rating in Africa. Since gaining independence in 1966, Botswana has been governed by the Botswana Democratic Party in a multi-party democracy.

Links: http://www.heritage.org/index/country/botswana

Pangolin Diamonds Corp. is building a leading diamond exploration and development company in the heart of Botswana, the world’s leading diamond producing country by value. The Company is the 100% owner of 11 Prospecting Licenses covering 5,307 km2, including the Tsabong North, Jwaneng South, Malatswae and Mmadinare Projects.

 

Pangolin’s management and team leaders have over 90 years of combined diamond exploration experience in Southern Africa. The Company is equipped for exploration, with two diamond drill rigs and a fully portable 1 tonne per hour Dense Media Separation Plant for sample preparation and making diamond concentrates.

 

Pangolin has 58,706,401 issued common shares outstanding.

 

Please visit our website at: www.pangolindiamondscorp.com

You can download the latest Corporate Presentation at

http://www.pangolindiamondscorp.com/pdfs/PAN-PPt-MineAfrica-2013.pdf

 

  • Diamond drilling commenced on Tsabong North Project
  • Over 80 priority kimberlite drill-ready targets identified
  • Several priority targets exceed 20 hectares in surface area
  • Financing of $2.171 million completed to fund 2013 exploration activities
TORONTO, ONTARIO (CANADA) (March 25, 2013) — Pangolin Diamonds Corp. (TSX-V: PAN) (the “Company” or “Pangolin”) is pleased to update shareholders on the Company’s 2013 financing and kimberlite diamond exploration activities at the Company’s 100% owned Tsabong North, Jwaneng South, Malatswae and Mmadinare Diamond projects (the “Projects”) in Botswana, Africa.

 

Exploration activities 2008 to 2012

 

Prior to the reverse takeover transaction (the “Transaction”) announced on February 21, 2012 (see Key Gold Holding Inc. [TSX.V: KGH] news release), Pangolin spent approximately $1 million to better delineate potential kimberlite targets. The Company completed airborne magnetics, detailed prospecting, soil sampling, pitting, trace element geochemistry and heavy mineral sample processing on all of its Projects. Through this process, more than 80 priority kimberlite drill targets have been identified and prioritized for future drilling; of these, over 50 are situated in the Tsabong North Project.

 

2013 financing completed

 

Pangolin successfully completed a financing that raised $2.171 million during the Transaction process. These funds are being used for the Company’s 2013 exploration activities.

 

Current and planned exploration activities in 2013

 

The recently raised funds have been allocated to the diamond drilling program, detailed ground magnetics and gravity surveys, and detailed soil sampling of the priority kimberlite targets. Diamond drilling has commenced at the Tsabong North Project. The Company has acquired two diamond drill rigs and a fully portable 1 tonne per hour Dense Media Separation Plant (or “DMS Plant”) capable of preparing samples and making diamond concentrates. Pangolin’s management and team leaders have over 90 years of combined diamond exploration experience in Southern Africa.

 

Pangolin’s Botswana diamond projects

 

Pangolin holds 11 Prospecting Licences in Botswana covering 5,307 km2.  The Project Areas are all 100% owned and are situated in multiple locations including Tsabong North, Jwaneng South, Malatswae, and Mmadinare.

 

Link to map of Botswana and Pangolin’s Project locations : http://www.pangolindiamondscorp.com/pdfs/PDC-Property-Map-Nov-2012.pdf

 

Tsabong North Project

The Tsabong North Project, located approximately 100 km north of the town of Tsabong in southwestern Botswana, is 1,545 km2 in size. It is comprised of anomalous concentrations of kimberlite indicators and has large geo-botanical features. Pangolin has already identified more than 50 drill-ready aeromagnetic targets in the Project area, several of which have surface areas exceeding 20 hectares. Exploration activities in the area are guided in part by the recommendations of a National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report prepared for the Project.

 

The Project is situated on the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton, immediately north of the diamondiferous Tsabong kimberlite field that hosts the M-1 pipe, the largest known diamondiferous kimberlite pipe in the world (www.firestonediamonds.com). Pangolin’s Chairman and its single largest shareholder, Dr. Leon Daniels, was part of the Falconbridge Team that developed the geological model of the 180 hectare M-1 pipe that was discovered in 1980. He was also directly involved in the discovery of several new kimberlites in the Tsabong kimberlite field.

 

Pangolin’s soil sampling has produced highly anomalous concentrations of kimberlite indicators within the Project area. Microprobe analyses of indicator minerals have confirmed the presence of G10 garnets, indicating the presence of a mantle conducive to the crystallization of diamonds. A number of indicators occur, including remnants of kelyphite that indicate close proximity to kimberlite. Enzyme-leach trace element results are consistent with orientation trace element results over known kimberlites near the Project.
Jwaneng South Project

 

The Jwaneng South Project is 799.4 km2 in size. It is situated 50 km south of De Beers’ Jwaneng Mine, which is the richest diamond mine in the world, having produced 12.5 to 15 million carats per annum since 1982 (www.debswana.com).
The Project area has large geo-botanical features and includes four targets believed to cover more than 20 hectares each. Indicator studies, aeromagnetic work and trace elements support these high priority targets.
Rooikoppie alluvial gravels have been discovered in the south of the Project area. These alluvial gravels, which have not been previously reported in Botswana, are a well known source of diamonds in South Africa.

 

Malatswae Project
The Malatswae Project covers an area of 1,174 km2 and is located near De Beers’ Orapa diamond mine. The primary targets identified are potential alluvial diamonds sourced from the Orapa Kimberlite Field (www.debswana.com). De Beers’ Orapa mine is one of the largest open pit diamond mines in the world, producing 17.3 million carats in 2006 alone.

 

A review of past diamond exploration programs conducted by several companies over the past 25 years has identified a wide scatter of kimberlitic garnets over the Malatswae Project area (Botswana Department of Mines Library). The wide spatial distribution and chemistry of the garnets indicate the area’s potential to be a new kimberlite field. This enhances the potential for discovery of other kimberlite sources in the Project area.
Pangolin has therefore developed dual objectives for exploration in the Malatswae Project: to discover economically viable alluvial diamond deposits; and to discover primary sources of diamonds within the project area such as diamondiferous kimberlites.

 

Mmadinare Project
The Mmadinare Project is 1,345.6 km2 in size. It has multiple geo-botanical features similar to known kimberlites, several of which are closely associated with indicator minerals. De Beers has previously reported kimberlite indicators in the Project area (Botswana Department of Mines Library). The geological environment is similar to operating diamond mines including Venetia, the Oaks, Martinsdrift and River Ranch.

 

The technical disclosure in this news release has been reviewed and approved by Dr. Leon Daniels, B.Sc., Ph.D., Member of AIG, Chairman of the Board of Pangolin, and Mr. Jean Lafleur, B.Sc., M.Sc., P. Geo., an independent Director of the Company. Both individuals are Qualified Persons under National Instrument 43-101 rules.

 

 

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Togo /économie : Des entrepreneurs se familiarisent aux innovations majeures de la loi de finance 2013

Posted on 22 March 2013 by Louis Bararmna

« Les innovations majeures de la loi de finance 2013 », c’est le thème de la 2ème édition du mercredi des entrepreneurs tenue le 21 mars 2013 à Lomé.

Organisée par l’Agence Nationale de Promotion et de Garantie de Financement (ANPGF) des PME/PMI, en collaboration avec la Chambre de Commerce et d’Industrie du Togo (CCIT), et avec l’appui de la direction générale des impôts, cette session se veut une occasion pour les chefs d’entreprises, responsables fiscaux et financiers des PME et PMI, comptables et auditeurs financiers des sociétés, d’analyser les innovations introduites et de découvrir les portées et les limites de cette   disposition légale.

‘’Nul n’est censé ignorer la loi’’, affirme une maxime.

La loi de finanace 2013 avait été adoptée par l’Assemblée Nationale le 29 décembre dernier, et il importe donc que les usagers s’approprient cet important instrument juridique qui a certes, des conséquences majeures sur le fonctionnement de leurs structures respectives, notamment  dans les domaines de l’économie, de la fiscalité et de la gestion.

Au-delà de ce séminaire  d’information et de formation, ‘’l’ANPGF compte organiser les 03 et 05 avril prochains, un atelier sur la fiscalité des PME/PMI à l’endroit des entrepreneurs ou dirigeants d’entreprise, dans le but de leur permettre de maîtriser l’environnement fiscal du Togo.’’, a annoncé Mme Naka De SOUZA, directrice générale de l’ANPGF.

 

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TechNavio Announces the Publication of Its Research Report – Global Scientific Instrument Market 2012-2016

Posted on 17 March 2013 by Africa Business

TechNavio’s report, the Global Scientific Instrument Market 2012-2016, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the Americas, and the EMEA and APAC regions. The report includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market.

 

London, United Kingdom (PR.com)– TechNavio today launched its report Global Scientific Instrument Market 2012-2016 based on an in-depth analysis covering the Americas, and the EMEA and APAC regions. The report aims to aid decision makers’ understanding of the present and future landscape of the market. 

Commenting on the report, an analyst from TechNavio’s Engineering team said: “The Global Scientific Instrument market is growing at a rapid pace. Therefore, several major players in the market are trying to expand their presence in the market. A number of mergers, acquisitions, and strategic alliances are taking place in the market space. Many big players and emerging contenders in the Global Scientific Instrument market are looking for mergers and acquisitions. Moreover, many vendors are creating alliances with smaller and bigger companies to capture more market share. This enhances their distribution channels and improves their market reach. Thus, mergers and acquisitions help companies remain competitive in the market.”

According to the report, one of the major drivers is the increasing demand from developing countries. The process industries in developing and emerging economies such as China, India, South Africa, and Brazil are experiencing high growth. This creates huge potential for the growth of the Global Scientific Instrument market during the forecast period. Rapidly growing process industries such as the Mining and Chemical industries are increasingly adopting general purpose analytical instruments for their elemental analysis and separation analysis processes.

Further, the report discusses that one of the major challenges confronting the market is the decrease in global healthcare spending.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors. For further information on this report, please visit http://www.technavio.com/content/global-scientific-instrument-market-2012-2016

TechNavio, the market research platform of Infiniti Research Ltd, publishes periodic market research reports on niche and emerging technologies. For more information on our Engineering market research, please visit http://www.technavio.com/engineering-software

Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/TechNavio

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