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Fi Istanbul’s Success Demonstrates Unlimited Market Opportunities in Turkey, the Middle East & North Africa

Posted on 18 May 2013 by Africa Business

Staggering 3,000 Visitors + 150 Exhibiting Brands and Record Re-Booking Volumes for the 2014 Event

Yes, we’ve got a lot to shout about and so we would like to start with a huge thank you to all of our exhibitors who helped to make Food ingredients Istanbul such a great success. As the only dedicated food ingredients event in the region, last week’s highly successful show demonstrates that this region is thriving and thirsty for the very latest ingredients, solutions, innovations and networking opportunities.

We are delighted to announce that Food ingredients Istanbul exceeded all forecasts and expectations with the impressive amount of 3,000 visitors and a 94% rebooking rate. As a launch event, Fi Istanbul welcomed attendees from over 80 different countries, filling all aisles and bustling exhibitor stands.

It is clear that the industry responded well to this launch event. Building on the high growth rates that the food industry is experiencing in this region, Fi Istanbul provided a strong platform for all food and beverage manufacturers to source from over 150 local, regional and international food ingredients suppliers.

The response from the exhibitors was overwhelming! Many claimed to have had one of the best shows ever, with a high quality of visitors, a steady flow of traffic during the 3 days and a good mix of visiting companies, including food manufacturers from dairy, ice cream, confectionary, meat, poultry and many more.

Turkey, for a global company, is a very important market for us to be close to our customers. Food ingredients Istanbul has been a great experience to meet new customers in 3 days and share projects, prototypes, concepts and innovations” Luis Fernandez , Vice-President Global Applications, Tate & Lyle

Natasha Berrow , UBM’s Brand Director, also commented, “Last week’s event really did surpass even our expectations! The positive response to this launch event, the new Fi branding and signage provided the innovative environment that such a growing region deserves.”

She continued “the record re-bookings are further indication that exhibitors see Fi Istanbul as the place to continue to meet their customers and to expand into this booming region. I’d like to express our appreciation for the tremendous and ongoing support of all our customers.”

“We are very impressed by the quality of visitors; quality is more important than quantity. We found a lot of good customers that we’ll probably start new business with” Stella Wu , International Sales Manager, JK Sucralose

Visitor feedback also surpassed all expectations. The great mix of local, regional and international food ingredients suppliers was complimented by many attendees looking to source new ingredients from companies they never heard of.

“I want to know new suppliers and I want to see some different varieties of products that I can use for my customers. This is the first year for this exhibition and it feels like it has being a successful opening and I’m sure it will get greater and bigger in the coming years.” Meleknur Tuzun, Sales Manager, Agrana

Fi Istanbul is a key part of the Food ingredients Global Portfolio strategy to extend the its brand into new regions, offering exhibiting clients a platform to engage with new customers and present their new business growth opportunities. With the key focus on business development, innovation and trade, in a region with one of the fastest economic growth rates in the world, Fi Istanbul proved to be one of the most cost-effective platforms to source new ingredients, grow market share and act as a stepping stone to this vastly and yet close to untouched food industry.

 

About Fi ingredients Global – the trusted route to market since 1986

Food ingredients first launched in Utrecht, The Netherlands in 1986 and its portfolio of live events, publications, extensive database, digital solutions and high-level conferences are now established across the globe to provide regional and a global meeting place for all stakeholders in the food ingredients industry. Over 500,000 people have attended our shows over the years, and billions of Euros of business have been created as a result. With over 25 years of excellence, our events, digital solutions and supporting products deliver a proven route to market with a truly global audience.

About UBM Istanbul

UBM Istanbul was established in April 2012 to connect people and create opportunities for companies wishing to build business between Europe and Asia, meet customers, launch new products, promote their brands and expand their markets. Premier brands such as Fi Europe, CPhI, IFSEC, Black Hat, Mother & Baby Show , Jewellery and many others and will become an integral part of the marketing plans of companies across more than 10 industry sectors.

About UBM

UBM plc is a global events-led marketing services and communications company. We help businesses do business, bringing the world’s buyers and sellers together at events and online, as well as producing and distributing specialist content and news. Our 5,500 staff in more than 30 countries are organised into specialist teams which serve commercial and professional communities, helping them to do business and their markets to work effectively and efficiently.

For more information, go to http://www.ubm.com

SOURCE UBM Live

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Unreliable Power Supply Creates Huge Demand for Non-renewable Inverters, Finds Frost & Sullivan

Posted on 18 May 2013 by Africa Business

Cost competitiveness vital to expand in developing markets

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. /PRNewswire/ — The global non-renewable inverter market grew steadily on the back of rising demand for reliable power and the lack of stable power infrastructure in many regions of the world. Higher disposable incomes and greater affordability in developing regions such as Latin America, as well as parts of Africa and South Asia, encourage the adoption of power inverters, especially in residential markets.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan’s (http://www.powersupplies.frost.com) Analysis of the Global Non-renewable Inverter Market research finds the market earned revenue of approximately $1.94 billion in 2012 and estimates this to reach $2.34 billion in 2018.

For more information on this research, please email Britni Myers , Corporate Communications, at britni.myers@frost.com, with your full name, company name, job title, telephone number, company email address, company website, city, state and country.

“The need for power reliability stimulates demand for power inverter and inverter/chargers, as they are employed as part of a back-up power system involving a battery,” said Frost & Sullivan Energy and Environment Senior Industry Analyst Anu Elizabeth Cherian. “The manufacturing and commercial sectors’ increased awareness and proactive protective measures such as employing adequate back-up resources to manage business more efficiently gives a significant boost to the market’s prospects.”

The market will also gain from the escalating use of electronic equipment in boats, cars, trucks, ambulances and recreational vehicles. Power inverters and inverter chargers can meet business travelers’ or vacationers’ demand for connectivity on the go as well.

While power inverters are establishing a foothold in the power industry, the gradual pace of economic recovery and restrained spending environment are stymieing inverter manufacturers’ efforts to expand. Further, the slowdown in infrastructural build-outs in telecommunications and investments makes customers cautious about investing in inverters.

“Inverter manufacturers could attempt to offset the price issue by offering enhanced features for the premium products or lowering prices,” noted Cherian. “We know that without a solid solution, power quality issues will continue to persist.  This improved awareness of the need to be well prepared for power outages bolsters the power inverter market.”

Analysis of the Global Non-renewable Inverter Market is part of the Energy and Environment Growth Partnership Service program. Frost & Sullivan’s related research services include: Analysis of the Mexican Distributed Power Generation Market, Asia-Pacific Rental Power Market, Bangladesh Uninterruptible Power Supply Market, and Critical Energy Infrastructure Protection in Europe. All research services included in subscriptions provide detailed market opportunities and industry trends evaluated following extensive interviews with market participants.

Connect with Frost & Sullivan on social media, including Twitter, Facebook, SlideShare, and LinkedIn, for the latest news and updates.

About Frost & Sullivan

Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today’s market participants.

Our “Growth Partnership” supports clients by addressing these opportunities and incorporating two key elements driving visionary innovation: The Integrated Value Proposition and The Partnership Infrastructure.

  • The Integrated Value Proposition provides support to our clients throughout all phases of their journey to visionary innovation including: research, analysis, strategy, vision, innovation and implementation.
  • The Partnership Infrastructure is entirely unique as it constructs the foundation upon which visionary innovation becomes possible. This includes our 360 degree research, comprehensive industry coverage, career best practices as well as our global footprint of more than 40 offices.

For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organization prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices, changing customer dynamics and emerging economies?

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Analysis of the Global Non-renewable Inverter Market
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Corporate Communications – North America
P: 210.477.8481
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SOURCE Frost & Sullivan

 

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Ozwald Boateng Steps in as Guest Editor for a Leading Issue of New African

Posted on 18 May 2013 by Africa Business

Made In Africa Foundation

The Made In Africa Foundation is a charitable organisation, established to support strategic infrastructure projects and create sustainable solutions to some of Africa’s most pressing problems. It works to support technical feasibility studies, to kick start key infrastructure developments and to engage the African diaspora in innovative fund-raising activities. The Foundation was founded in 2011 by international designer Ozwald Boateng OBE, and Nigerian businessman Kola Aluko, and is supported by Atlantic Energy.

 

The leading pan-African current affairs magazine, New African, has just published its May edition, guest edited by the internationally renowned Ghanaian designer Ozwald Boateng , a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader and founder of the Made in Africa Foundation.

This new issue looks at a Future Made in Africa and, in a 60 page supplement, celebrates the Organisation of African Unity’s (now the AU’s) golden jubilee. It has a strong focus on infrastructure, which reflects the work of the Made in Africa foundation – a $400m fund to finance feasibility studies to fast-track infrastructure investment throughout Africa.

Editorial contributors include Tony Blair , President Ellen Sirleaf-Johnson , Tony Elumelu, Mo Ibrahim , David Adjaye , Jay Naidoo , Omar Bongo Ondimba, Minna Salami, Swaady Martin-Leke, and Kandeh Yumkella and Babatunde Fashola .

In its “Trailblazers under 50″ feature, New African presents its selection of 50 Africans under the age of 50, who are breaking ground and raising hopes for Africa’s future.  The list includes Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Alex Wek , Didier Drogba, Hadeel Ibrahim , David Rudisha, Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu, Juliana Totich, P-Square, Dambisa Moyo and its very own readers.

In his introductory article “Why our future should be made in Africa“. Boateng insists “If the world is to get beyond boom and bust, it requires African creators, farmers, workers, industrialists and leaders to be given the tools and opportunities to play their part for the good of all”.

Omar Ben Yedder , publisher of New African magazine, commented: “ Ozwald Boateng has done a fantastic job and this really is a collector’s item – one which we hope will be read and studied in schools and universities across Africa. It was a true learning experience working on this issue”.

The May 2013 issue is available on newsstands and local vendors now.

SOURCE Made in Africa Foundation

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Oando Energy Resources Announces Additional 2,500 bopd Production Capacity From Ebendo Field

Posted on 16 May 2013 by Africa Business

About Oando Energy Resources Inc. (OER)

OER currently has a broad suite of producing, development and exploration properties in the Gulf of Guinea (predominantly in Nigeria) with current production of approximately 5,205 bopd from the Abo Field in OML 125 and the Ebendo Field. OER has been specifically structured to take advantage of current opportunities for indigenous companies in Nigeria, which currently has the largest population in Africa, and one of the largest oil and gas resources in Africa.

 

Oando Energy Resources Inc. (“OER” or the “Company“) (TSX: OER), a company focused on oil exploration and production in Nigeria, today announced results from the successful completion and testing of the Ebendo 5 well. The completion and testing of the Ebendo 5 well, which is expected to contribute an additional 2,500 barrels of oil per day (“bopd”) gross (1,069 bopd net to OER), follows the successful resumption of 3,200 bopd gross (1,368 bopd net to OER) production on the Ebendo field, as was announced on April 24, 2013.

“We’re extremely pleased to announce the successful completion of the Ebendo 5 well drilling programme, increasing our net capacity by 1,069 bopd,” said Pade Durotoye , CEO of OER. “Ebendo currently has a total production capacity of up to 7,000 bopd, but is currently subject to takeaway capacity restrictions as a result of the Kwale-Akri pipeline. In light of this, we are increasing our efforts to establish our alternative evacuation pipeline, the 53 Kilometer, 45kboepd Umugini pipeline, that will further support the development of this field and reduce our dependence on one evacuation pipeline.”

The Ebendo 5 well was spudded as a deviated appraisal/development well on October 12, 2012, mainly to appraise the intermediate reservoirs encountered by the earlier Ebendo 4 well. The Ebendo 5 well was drilled to a total vertical depth (TVD) of 11,513ft and encountered eight hydrocarbon bearing sands. A drill stem test was successfully completed on two of these sands (XVIIIc and XVIIId). Sand XVIIId flowed for 18 hours and 30 minutes during the final flow test on four choke sizes. On average, it flowed on choke 28/64″ for 3 hours and 30 minutes, with an average oil and gas rate of 1,592 bopd and 2.45 mmscf/day, respectively. Sand XVIIIc flowed for 15 hours and 50 minutes during the final flow test on three choke sizes. On average, it flowed on choke 24/64″ for 8 hours and 23 minutes, with an average oil and gas rate of 840 bopd and 4.62 mmscf/day, respectively. Oil with API gravities of 47.2 degrees and 46.4 degrees were recovered from levels XVIIIc and XVIIId, respectively. Testing of sand XV is planned to occur during production, as there was a mechanical failure during testing of this sand after the completion of the well. However, from Modular Formation Dynamic Testing (MDT) pressure sampling, the fluid gradient in level XV was 0.272 pressure per foot (psi/ft), which is indicative of oil, there was no appreciable steady decline in the pressures during the Test.

The Ebendo 5 well was dually completed and sand XV will be produced through the short string while sands XVIIIc and XVIIId will be produced through the long string via a sliding sleeve. The Acme Rig-5 was released on April 17, 2013 from the Ebendo 5 well site.

The Company further announced that a new rig, the Deutag T-26, has been mobilised and a sixth well (the Ebendo 6 well) was spudded on April 18, 2013. TVD for the Ebendo 6 well is planned to be at 10,680 ft. To date, the Ebendo 6 well has been drilled to a total vertical depth of 6,231 ft. The results from this drilling programme will enable further appraisal of the shallow reservoirs encountered in the last two wells.

As pressure transient analysis or well-test interpretation has not been carried out, all results disclosed in this press release should be regarded as preliminary and are not necessarily indicative of long-term performance or ultimate recovery. The results will be updated when additional data becomes available.

 

SOURCE Oando Energy Resources Inc.

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Satellite ultra-broadband in Europe & Africa

Posted on 15 May 2013 by Africa Business

NEW YORK, May 15, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Satellite ultra-broadband in Europe & Africa

http://www.reportlinker.com/p01029508/Satellite-ultra-broadband-in-Europe–Africa.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Broadband

In this report, IDATE identifies the latest developments and major trends in the broadband and ultra-fast broadband markets. After a detailed analysis of the various terrestrial networks and their coverage, it examines satellite technology and the opportunities for positioning it as a complementary service to terrestrial networks to reduce the digital divides that currently exist in Europe and Africa.

Region: Europe: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, TurkeyAfrica: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Rep., Chad, Congo, Dem. Rep., Congo, Rep., Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eriteria, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Contents • Part 1

Recalling the objectives of the Digital Agenda

• Part 2

Status of broadband market in Europe

• Part 3

Status of ultra-broadband market in Europe

• Part 4

Status of satellite broadband market in Europe

• Part 5

Satellite operator strategies

• Part 6

IDATE’s assessment and market forecasts up to 2017

• Part 7

Introduction to Africa

• Part 8

Status of broadband market in Africa

• Part 9

Satellite operator strategies

• Part 10

IDATE’s assessment and market forecasts up to 2017

• In this report, IDATE identifies the latest developments and major trends in the broadband and ultra-fast broadband markets.

• After a detailed analysis of the various terrestrial networks and their coverage, it examines satellite technology and the opportunities for positioning it as a complementary service to terrestrial networks to reduce the digital divides that currently exist in Europe and Africa.

Recalling the objectives of the Digital Agenda 9• Digital Agenda objectives are being met for basic broadband 10• Objectives of national plans diverging from Digital Agenda for ultra-broadband 112. Status of broadband market in Europe 12• DSL network coverage is improving 13• Rural coverage still needs to progress 14• As a consequence of the DAE, bitrates are improving fast 15• Competition from mobile networks gathers pace 163. Status of ultra-broadband market in Europe 17• Migration to ultra-fast broadband continues on the fixed market… 18• Adoption among households remains low 19• LTE is now launched in most European countries 20• Mobile operators are now tackling the residential fixed market 21• Towards the era of the Gbps 224. Status of satellite broadband market in Europe 23• Some

Figures

on satellite broadband consumers 24• Satellite access solutions are highly competitive 25• Satellite access solutions are tailored to tackle under-served terrestrial markets 26• Full satellite triple-play packages can be proposed 27• 5. Satellite operator strategies in Europe 28• Eutelsat 29• SES 31• Avanti 33• 6. IDATE’s assessment and market forecasts for Europe 34• 7. Introduction to Africa 36• A market with several barriers to entry 37• The fast deployment of submarine cables is a game changer 38• On land, fibre backbone networks are also being deployed 39• Impact of fibre deployment on satellite bandwidth princing 40• 8. Status of broadband market in Africa 41• Africa has less than 5% of world users 42• Fixed broadband prices are unsustainable 43• Mobile telephony is becoming the entry point for Internet access 44• Mobile broadband is progressing rapidly 45• Mobile broadband pricing is decreasing 46• 9. Satellite operator strategies in Africa 47• YahSat 48• SES and Eutelsat 49• 10. IDATE’s assessement and market forecasts for Africa 50• IDATE’s assessement and market forecats up to 2017 51• Who are we? 52

Figures

• Figure 1: Fixed broadband penetration in Europe 10• Figure 2: Digital agenda objectives 11• Figure 3: Total DSL network coverage in Europe, end-2011 (% of population) 13• Figure 4: Rural DSL network coverage in Europe, end-2011 (% of population) 14• Figure 5: Fixed broadband lines by speed, 2008-2012 15• Figure 6: Fixed broadband lines by speed, January 2012 15• Figure 7: Total HSPA coverage in Europe, end of 2011 16• Figure 8: Rural HSPA coverage in Europe, end of 2011 16• Figure 9: FTTx network coverage, end-2011 18• Figure 10: FTTH/B adoption, YE 2012 19• Figure 11: Other FTTx technologies adoption, YE 2012 19• Figure 12: Timetable for LTE spectrum in Western Europe 20• Figure 13: Evolution of LTE coverage in Portugal following use of the 800 MHz band 20• Figure 14: HomeFusion service offered by Verizon Wireless 21• Figure 15: LTE service for homes offered by TeliaSonera 21• Figure 16: Evolution of fixed broadband technologies up to 2030 22• Figure 17: LTE-Advanced performance 22• Figure 18: Bandwidth consumption, per subscriber 24• Figure 19: Bandwidth consumption, by application 24• Figure 20: Evolution of satellite broadband offering for basic package 25• Figure 21 : Price change of a broadband satellite reception terminal 25• Figure 22: Positioning of some satellite broadband offerings in France(as of February 2013) 26• Figure 23: In the USA, ViaSat and Hughes tackle 26• Figure 24: Dishnet satellite triple-play packages being offered by Dish (based on HughesNet Gen4 service) in the USA 27• Figure 25: Satellite broadband terminal proposed by Eutelsat with TV reception capability 27• Figure 26: Ka-Sat coverage 29• Figure 27: Selected packages based on Ka-Sat 29• Figure 28: Evolution of Tooway subscriber base 30• Figure 29: Evolution of Tooway download speeds 30• Figure 30: Hybrid vision of SES 31• Figure 31: Broadband for communities (launched in 2011) 31• Figure 32: Evolution of ASTRA2Connect subscribers 32• Figure 33: Evolution of ASTRA2Connect download speeds 32• Figure 34: Avanti coverage in Europe (Hylas-1 satellite) 33• Figure 35: Satellite broadband packages distributed by irish distributor, Qsat (downlink speeds from 4 to 10 Mbps) 33• Figure 36: Forecast of residential subscriptions to a two-way ultrabroadband satellite solution in Europe, 2013-2017 35• Figure 37: Literacy rates in Africa 37• Figure 38: PC penetration in Africa 37• Figure 39: Evolution of submarine cable deployments in Africa 38• Figure 40: Map of terrestrial fibre backbones in Africa, YE 2012 39• Figure 41: E1 pricing for a selection of African countries, 2012 39• Figure 42: Excerpt from Seacom commercial brochure 40• Figure 43: Average evolution of bandwidth prices over 2009-2012 40• Figure 44: Fixed broadband access penetration in Africa, end 2012 42• Figure 45: Fixed broadband penetration compared with literacy rate 42• Figure 46: Price of fixed broadband subscriptions based on per capita GDP 43• Figure 47: African mobile penetration, as of YE 2012 44• Figure 48: Top 5 African mobile markets, at YE 2012 44• Figure 49: Status of 3G, as of February 2013 45• Figure 50: Top 5 African 3G markets, at YE 2012 45• Figure 51: Monthly broadband basket, YE 2011 46• Figure 52: YahClick coverage 48• Figure 53: Eutelsat IP Easy coverage 49• Figure 54: Satellite broadband packages being offered as of year-end 2012 by Get2Net (SES ASTRA2Connect) 49• Figure 55: Forecast of residential subscriptions to a two-way ultrabroadband satellite solution in Africa, 2013-2017 51• Table 1: Basic coverage national objectives, in selected countries 10• Table 2: Objectives of national broadband plans, in selected countries 11• Table 3: Electrification rates in Africa 37• Table 4: Selection of mobile broadband basket (prepaid handsetbased), YE 2011 46• Table 5: Array of speeds offered by Vox Telecom in South Africa and Coolink in Nigeria (as of February 2013) 488

To order this report:Broadband Industry: Satellite ultra-broadband in Europe & Africa

Contact Clare: clare@reportlinker.com
US:(339) 368 6001
Intl:+1 339 368 6001

 

SOURCE Reportlinker

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Baird Furthers Canada’s Interests and Values in Kenya

Posted on 15 May 2013 by Africa Business

OTTAWA, Canada, May 15, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird today signalled Canada’s interest in growing trade and investment with Kenya and our intent to meaningfully engage when it comes to shared values.

Canada looks forward to both countries beginning exploratory discussions regarding a foreign investment promotion and protection agreement to help create a safer, more stable environment for investors and economic opportunities for both countries.

“Our government is focused on creating jobs, growth and long-term prosperity,” said Baird. “When it comes to African markets, Kenya is a major player, and increasing trade ties will benefit both countries.”

The potential for increased Canadian investment in Kenya is important and Canada is keen to explore opportunities for freer trade generally with Kenya and the East African Community, especially for Canadian natural resource companies, which are becoming leaders in the Kenyan mining and oil and gas industries.

Baird highlighted that greater commercial engagement and people-to-people ties come with the opportunity and responsibility to engage on protecting and promoting Canadian values.

To that end, Baird held a round-table meeting with defenders of the rights of sexual minorities in East Africa.

“In too many places, people are branded as criminals or made victims of violence because of their sexuality,” said Baird. “Canada is a leading defender of human rights for all, and I applaud the courage and conviction of those advocates working on the ground to improve the lives of sexual minorities.”

Baird also encouraged Kenya’s newly elected government to continue its engagement with the International Criminal Court.

 

SOURCE

Canada – Ministry of Foreign Affairs

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Global Trade Partners in the 21st Century

Posted on 15 May 2013 by Africa Business

WASHINGTON, May 15, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Remarks

Robert D. Hormats

Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment

World Economic Forum

Pretoria, South Africa

May 14, 2013

 

 

As Prepared

 

Thank you Lyal for the kind introduction.

I am delighted to be in South Africa again. I visited last fall with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

What was most striking then, and continues to be the case today, is the extent to which the image of Africa has changed. According to the IMF, growth in sub-Saharan Africa will surge to 6.1% next year, well ahead of the global average of 4%.

Africa is booming in nearly every sector, ranging from massive energy developments in Mozambique, Tanzania, Ghana, and other countries; to the growth of Rwanda and Kenya’s information and communications technology sectors; to South Africa’s thriving auto industry. And, though far from declaring victory, Africa is reaching a turning point in its hard-fought battles against poverty and corruption.

Today’s Africa looks nothing like what, in 2000, The Economist referred to as the “Hopeless Continent.” It is critical that we concentrate the world’s eyes on the new image of Africa, that of progress and promise. Perspectives are evolving—in 2011, The Economist referred to Africa as the “Rising Continent” and, last March, as the “Hopeful Continent.”

Trade is at the heart of Africa’s economic resurgence. So, in this context, I will speak first about America’s vision for global trade in the 21st century and then, focus on implications and, indeed, opportunities for Africa. America’s global trade agenda in the 21st century is shaped by a foundation laid, in large part, in the mid-20th century. After World War II, American and European policymakers worked together to build a set of international institutions that embodied democratic and free market principles.

The GATT—which led to the WTO—World Bank, IMF, and the OECD were designed to foster international economic cooperation. These institutions were vital to the economic prosperity of the United States, and to the success of America’s foreign policy and national security for the next three generations.

As we move into the 21st century, a new multi-polar global economy has surfaced. The emergence of a new group of economic powerhouses—Brazil, Russia, India, and China, of course, but also countries in Africa—has created momentum (if not necessity) for greater inclusiveness in the global trading system.

At the same time, these new players must assume responsibilities for the international economic system commensurate with the increasing benefits they derive from the global economy. In addition to the geography of international trade, the nature of trade and investment has evolved to include previously unimaginable issues such as e-commerce and sustainability.

So, part of our vision for trade in the 21st century is to build a system that is more inclusive, recognizes the new realities of economic interdependence, and matches increased participation in the global trading system with increased responsibility for the global trading system.

We are making progress with bringing new players into the global trading system as equal partners. Free Trade Agreements with Korea, Colombia, and Panama entered into force last year.

And, we are continuing negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership—or TPP as it is more widely known. With Japan’s anticipated entry into the negotiations, TPP will grow to include 12 countries of different size, background, and levels of development. The agreement, when finalized, will encompass nearly 40% of global GDP and one-third of global trade.

In addition to TPP, we are embarking on a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership with the European Union. TTIP—as it is being called—will strengthen economic ties between the United States and Europe, and enhance our ability to build stronger relationships with emerging economies in Asia, Africa, and other parts of the world.

TPP and TTIP are truly historic undertakings. Our objective is not only to strengthen economic ties with the Asia-Pacific and Europe, but also to pioneer approaches to trade and investment issues that have grown in importance in recent years.

These agreements will seek to break new ground by addressing a multitude of heretofore unaddressed non-tariff barriers, setting the stage for convergence on key standards and regulations, and establishing high quality norms and practices that can spread to other markets. TPP, for example, will raise standards on investment and electronic commerce, and afford protections for labor and the environment.

Our agenda also includes strengthening the multilateral trading system through the World Trade Organization. For example, the United States would like to see a multilateral Trade Facilitation Agreement, which would commit WTO Members to expedite the movement, release, and clearance of goods, and improve cooperation on customs matters. A Trade Facilitation Agreement would be a win-win for all parties—Africa especially.

Cross-border trade in Africa is hindered by what the World Bank calls “Thick Borders.” According to the latest Doing Business Report, it takes up to 35 days to clear exports and 44 days to clear imports in Africa. Clearing goods in OECD countries, in contrast, takes only 10 days on average and costs nearly half as much. Countries like Ghana and Rwanda have benefited tremendously from the introduction of trade facilitation tools and policies.

Ghana, for instance, introduced reforms in 2003 that decreased the cost and time of trading across borders by 60%, and increased customs revenue by 50%. A multilateral Trade Facilitation Agreement will create a glide path for increased trade with and within Africa.

Our views for 21st century global trade partnerships go beyond Europe and the Asia-Pacific, and efforts at the WTO. We are committed to supporting Africa’s integration into the global trading system. The cornerstone of our trade relationship with sub-Saharan Africa is the African Growth and Opportunity Act—known as AGOA. Of all of our trade preference programs, AGOA provides the most liberal trade access to the U.S. market.

Exports from Africa to the United States under the AGOA have grown to $34.9 billion in 2012. While oil and gas still represent a large portion of Africa’s exports, it is important to recognize that non-petroleum exports under AGOA have tripled to nearly $5 billion since 2001, when AGOA went into effect. And, compared to a decade ago, more than twice the number of eligible countries are exporting non-petroleum goods under AGOA.

South Africa, in particular, has made great strides in diversifying its exports to the United States. Thanks to AGOA, the United States is now South Africa’s main export market for passenger cars, representing more than 50% of exported value in 2012. Because AGOA is such an important mechanism for African countries to gain access to the U.S. market, the Administration is committed to working with Congress on an early, seamless renewal of AGOA. Our trade relationship with Africa goes beyond AGOA. For instance, AGOA represents only one-quarter of South African exports to the United States. The composition of South Africa’s exports to the United States, moreover, reflects complex interdependencies and industrial goods.

And, our trade relationship with Africa is not just about one-way trade. There is an immense opportunity for U.S. companies to do business on the continent.

We recently launched the “Doing Business in Africa Campaign” to help American businesses identify and seize upon trade and investment opportunities in Africa. The campaign was announced in Johannesburg, in part, because South Africa can play a prominent role in directing U.S. investment into other parts of the continent.

Although progress has been made on diversifying exports beyond energy, there is much more to be done. African ingenuity and entrepreneurship must be unleashed to drive innovation and growth throughout the continent. This requires closer integration to share ideas, transfer knowledge, and partner on solutions. Through AGOA and the “Doing Business in Africa Campaign”, we are promoting a business climate in Africa that enables and encourages trade and investment. However, realizing these goals is goes beyond trade preferences and commercial linkages.

Africa is also featured in America’s vision for global trade in the 21st century.

For example, we recently launched the U.S.-East African Community Trade and Investment Partnership—the first of its kind—to expand two-way trade and investment. The Partnership is designed to build confidence among the private sector by building a more open and predictable business climate in East Africa. We are considering a variety of mechanisms to accomplish this, including a regional investment treaty and trade facilitation agreement. The Partnership highlights our desire to help Africa integrate and compete in today’s global economy.

I will conclude with one final point. I began by saying that trade is at the heart of Africa’s economic resurgence. Trade is also at the heart of America’s economic recovery. We have a common interest and a common goal.

When it comes to enhanced trade, what is good for Africa is good for America. And what is good for America is good for Africa.

Thank you.


SOURCE

US Department of State

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Redi Tlhabi interviews Banda & Ramphele on South 2 North

Posted on 15 May 2013 by Africa Business

This Friday on Al Jazeera’s new global talk show South 2 North, Redi Tlhabi interviews two remarkable African leaders: Joyce Banda, Malawi’s first female president, and Dr. Mamphela Ramphele, founder of Agang, South Africa’s new party political platform.

President Banda became only the second woman to lead an African country in April 2012, following the example of Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. Time Magazine recently named Banda one of the most influential people in the world, while Forbes called her the most powerful woman in Africa in 2012.


Ramphele, a former vice-chancellor at The University of Cape Town and past managing director of The World Bank, was a co-founder of the Black Consciousness Movement with Steve Biko. In February 2013, she launched Agang, a new party political platform intended to challenge The African National Congress in South Africa.

What gender-related challenges have Banda and Ramphele had to overcome? Are there more opportunities for women in the political arena in Africa today? Do women do politics differently? Is there space developing for opposition politics in Africa?

Watch Redi ask the important questions on this week’s episode of South 2 North, which premieres at 19:30 GMT on Friday, 17 May 2013 and also screens Saturday at 14h30, Sunday 04h30 and Monday 08h30.

For more information, visit http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/south2north/, where all episodes are available to watch online.

You can also tweet your questions, comments and opinions to @AJSouth2North or find South 2 North on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/South-2-North/255419671252120.

Catch up on last week’s episode of South 2 North, where Redi discussed re-imagining Africa, at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMHlrLuaCC0.

 

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SA tooling and Manufacturing tackle revival challenge

Posted on 14 May 2013 by Africa Business

South Africa’s tooling and manufacturing sectors are aggressively tackling skills challenges, and modernising and growing their operations, with a view to taking on global manufacturing giants.

AfriMold, is the 4th annual manufacturing trade fair and conference for the design, precision engineering & machining, automotive component, tooling, tool making, production and application development sectors, and is taking place 4 – 6 June at the NASREC Expo Centre in Johannesburg.


Speaking ahead of this year’s AfriMold manufacturing trade fair from 4 – 6 June at the NASREC Expo Centre in Johannesburg, key industry players said South Africa’s manufacturing sector is experiencing a new spirit of revival, on the back of an aggressively modernising and growing tooling sector.

Dirk van Dyk, CEO of the National Tooling Initiative Programme, and representative of the Tooling Association of South Africa (TASA), noted that statistics released by ISTMA (International Specialized Tooling and Machining Association at the recent World Tooling Conference in Toronto, Canada, indicate that up to 50% of any manufactured component’s cost competiveness is governed by Tooling. However, the local TDM sector only provides approximately 20% of the local manufacturing sector’s tooling requirements. “The opportunity is there for the local TDM sector to increase this percentage significantly,” he said.

“There are more than 500 local Tool, Die and Mould manufacturing companies involved in local support of the manufacturing value chain ranging from 1st to 4th tier suppliers. The local tooling sector is gearing up for growth, presenting a positive outlook for manufacturing, and with it – job creation.”

Skills development is a key component of the tooling and manufacturing industry’s growth plans, says industry heads.

Van Dyk said the TDM Powered Pilot project, which started in 2010 as part of the turnaround strategy for the distressed tooling industry, has entered its 4th year of piloting with 408 students on Level II and Level III of the Apprenticeship Programme at 12 FET institutions in the country.

The National Skills Fund has allocated funding to Instimbi through the dti to fund another apprenticeship programme with 650 students at 12 FET institutions in the country.  It is envisaged that these students should be placed by May 2013.

In addition, enterprise development is reaching companies country wide through benchmarking exercises (based on international best practice and comparison to peers) to guide local Tool, Die and Mould manufacturing companies towards increased competiveness. Intervention projects are launched to aid companies on this journey.  A new round of benchmarking will start with 30 companies in April 2013.

Coenraad Bezuidenhout, Executive Director of Manufacturing Circle, says the Manufacturing Circle is launching two important initiatives to support government’s local procurement initiative and set an important example to the private sector, and to broaden its membership. The organisation plans to rapidly increase the approximately 200 000 manufacturing jobs that the Circle membership gives direct representation to today, and to include many more smaller and medium-sized manufacturers in the Manufacturing Circle. On 16 May, the Manufacturing Circle will launch its 2013 Q1 Manufacturing Circle Quarterly Survey on manufacturing business conditions, with a new component that will provide an indicator of the measure to which manufacturers procure locally, as well as the degree to which government’s local procurement impacts on manufacturers.

Meanwhile, the automotive sector, seen as a potentially promising growth area for local manufacturing, is seeking greater engagement with local organisations.

Roger Pitot, Executive Director of the National Association of Automotive Components and Allied Manufacturers (NAACAM) says: “We must double vehicle production volumes to over a million, and we must significantly increase local content from the present dismal 35%.”

Pitot says NAACAM members employ almost 50,000 people with a turnover last year of R57 billion. The total automotive sector, including vehicle assemblers, employs over 100,000 in manufacturing and 200,000 in sales and service operations.

“Unfortunately, the automotive trade deficit has been growing and reached an all-time high of R49 billion in 2012, mainly due to a record 72% of all cars sold in South Africa being imported. Exports in 2012 at R87 billion almost recovered to the record achieved in 2008, but the outlook for the future depends largely on the global economic situation, particularly in Europe, our biggest market.  The local auto industry has to compete globally, therefore our focus is on improving our competitiveness through efficiencies and cost reductions.”

Pitot adds: “Areas of uncompetitiveness include certain materials such as steel, wages, logistics and, increasingly, electricity. So opportunities lie in improving our efficiencies and our technological capabilities. These include manufacture of higher-level tooling, more local R&D and developing capabilities to produce the lighter and greener components that will form part of vehicles in future.”

The challenges and potential growth areas for design, precision engineering & machining, automotive component, tooling, tool making, production and application development sectors will come under the spotlight at the 4th annual AfriMold conference and trade fair. The event, a partner of the highly successful EuroMold trade fair, is endorsed by major industry bodies, as well as by the Department of Trade and Industry.

Ron MacLarty, Managing Director of AfriMold, says: “AfriMold 2013 will continue to innovate and push boundaries for the manufacturing industries’ continued growth and improved competitiveness as we strive for collaboration and cohesion on the home front.”

Bob Bond, Chairman of the Plastics Institute of South Africa (PISA) Northern Branch and AfriMold Conference Convenor, says the event’s theme, ‘Enabling For Tomorrow with a focus on precision engineering and tooling as a key enabler for the South African manufacturing sector, was chosen in light of the renewed drive for competitiveness.

Among the issues to be addressed at the conference are:

· What the SA Automotive sector expects from the local tooling industry

· Industrial Design: The Competitive Edge for Tooling and Manufacture

· Solutions for super profitable tool rooms

· How to fund equipment with IDC money

· Initiatives to boost Toolmaking Enterprises Development.

The AfriMold Trade Fair and Conference will also include the PISA/ AfriMold Student Design Presentations and PISA Member Awards.

For more information about AfriMold, visit www.afrimold.co.za or contact Terri Bernstein at Tel: +27 83 635 3539 or terri@afrimold.co.za

 

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China and Russia commit to World Energy Congress

Posted on 14 May 2013 by Africa Business

“Most important energy event in the world this year”

SEOUL – May 14, 2013: The Chinese and Russian governments have committed to sending high-level delegations to the World Energy Congress in South Korea in October, organizers said.

The Organizing Committee for the 2013 World Energy Congress said it had been notified that China’s National Energy Administration (NEA) would send a ministerial-level delegation to the event and that the government body had advised Chinese energy companies of its plan to attend.

The Chinese delegation will be one of the largest to the Congress, which will host up to 5,000 delegates from around the world, organizers said.

The Committee further announced that Alexander Novak, the Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation, would lead a delegation that will include the Russian ministries of Natural Resources and Environment, and of Foreign Affairs, as well as Gazprom, Transneft, Rosneft, RusHydro, the State Atomic Energy Corporation and other major energy companies.

The Russian delegation is planning a “Russia Day” event at the Congress.

The World Energy Congress is the world’s premier energy gathering and will take place on 13–17 October in the city of Daegu.

More than 200 prominent speakers, including energy ministers, industry CEOs and top experts and researchers, will answer the most pressing questions facing the global energy industry today

Under the theme of ‘Securing Tomorrow’s Energy Today’, topics range from the future prospects of the oil & gas, coal, nuclear, and renewables sectors to the tough policy decisions needed to balance the often conflicting priorities of energy security, universal access to affordable energy, and environmental protection. Delegates will also be given insights into how finance and innovation are shaping our energy future.

“We are delighted with the decision by the governmental and industry leaders in China and Russia,” said Dr. Christoph Frei, Secretary General of the London-based World Energy Council, which hosts the triennial event. “Having just been in China and Russia I know that this high level participation in the Congress will provide a fascinating overview of the opportunities and challenges of our energy world in transition. Such engagement by the world’s biggest players is crucial for a meaningful event.”

“Both countries are in the centre of many critical energy developments. We want to understand, within the global energy transformation, whether there is a refocus of ambition within the respective governments,” he said.

“We look forward to hearing more about developments in Russia and the energy challenges and opportunities in China at the World Energy Congress in October,” said Cho Hwan-eik, Chair of the Organising Committee of the 2013 World Energy Congress.

He added: “This will be the first time in the 90-year history of the event that China will have participated in such a significant way. For both the Chinese and Russians now to commit to the Daegu event underscores the fact that the Congress is the most important event on the global energy calendar this year.”

The Organising Committee also confirmed that a number of other governments are currently planning significant activity for the Congress. Mr. Cho added, “The discussions we are having with many governments at this early stage in our planning only serve to highlight the importance of this global event being staged in the heart of Asia at a time of significant transition in the energy sector.”

Media Enquiries:

Organizing Committee, World Energy Congress

Inang Park

Tel: +82 (2) 739 7016

M: 010 3213 7465

Email: inang.park@insightcomms.com

John Burton

Tel: +82 (2) 739 7045

M: +82 (0)10 2437 6265

Email: john.burton@insightcomms.com

World Energy Congress – international

Seán Galvin

Tel: +44 (0)20 7269 7133

M: +44 (0)7788 568 245

Email: sean.galvin@fticonsulting.com

World Energy Council

Monique Tsang

Tel: +44 (0)20 3214 0616

Email: tsang@worldenergy.org

About the World Energy Congress

The World Energy Congress is the world’s premier energy gathering. The triennial World Energy Congress has gained recognition since the first event in 1923 as the premier global forum for leaders and thinkers to debate solutions to energy issues. In addition to the discussions, the event provides an opportunity for executives to display their technologies and explore business opportunities. With the upcoming Congress in Daegu the event will have been held in 20 major cities around the world since its founding.

Further details at www.daegu2013.kr and @WECongress

About the World Energy Council (WEC)

The World Energy Council (WEC) is the principal impartial network of leaders and practitioners promoting an affordable, stable and environmentally sensitive energy system for the greatest benefit of all. Formed in 1923, WEC is the UN-accredited global energy body, representing the entire energy spectrum, with more than 3000 member organisations located in over 90 countries and drawn from governments, private and state corporations, academia, NGOs and energy related stakeholders. WEC informs global, regional and national energy strategies by hosting high-level events, publishing authoritative studies, and working through its extensive member network to facilitate the world’s energy policy dialogue.

Further details at www.worldenergy.org and @WECouncil

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