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World Conference on Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research & International Convention & Expo Summit 2013 (WHTER & ICES 2013) on 25th – 28th May 2013 at the Millennium Hilton Bangkok Hotel

Posted on 06 April 2013 by Africa Business

Siam University, International program in Hospitality and Tourism Management are proud to be the first university in Thailand hosting the World Conference on Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research & International Convention & Expo Summit 2013 (WHTER & ICES 2013) on 25th – 28th May 2013 at the Millennium Hilton Bangkok Hotel. Siam University will bring in over 300 delegates from all over the world to keep up with International academics’ view and cutting-edge ideas in Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research. This 2-in-1 conference will be themed as “Academics meet industry”.

“This is a very special occasion, because this is the first time the ICES will be held in Thailand. Moreover, it is a great honor for Siam University to be the first to hold such an event. WHTER and ICES 2013 will allow the exchange of  ideas and perspectives from industry and researchers in order to develop a better understanding of the MICE industry” Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bongkosh  N. Rittichainuwat, Director Program Hotel & Tourism Management

This year’s conference features panel sessions and keynote speakers on a various topics from academic institutes and industries, such as academic professionals, Prof. Kaye Chon, Dean of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Asia Pacific Travel Tourism Association, Mr. Bert Van Walbeek, Chairman, PATA Thailand Chapter, as well as prominent journal, Prof. Chris Ryan, editor-in-Chief, Tourism Management.

 

At the same time, Siam University aims to meet international delegates from Europe, United States and Asia Pacific to share the qualities of hospitality, tourism and event research, research to create global connection. Researchers and academic professors are invited to present their papers and attend this conference. The winner of WHTER Best Paper Award & ICES Best Paper Award will have his/her paper published in the Tourism Management, the Journal of Convention & Event Tourism & International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management.

Example journals: http://www.whterandices2013bysiamu.com/#!best-paper-awards/c46e

Siam University has chosen the Millennium Hilton Bangkok Hotel as the conference venue with its impressive meeting and dining facilities able to accommodate up to 700 people. Conference dinners will be held at signature restaurants such as Blue Elephant, Chatrium Hotel and Royal Thai Navy Hall. These venues once welcomed royal families, presidents, and prime ministers of different countries around the world.

For details concerning the paper presentation and other lodging information, please click onto the official website of WHTER & ICES 2013 at http://whterandices2013bysiamu.com

World Conference on Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research

International Convention & Expo Summit 2013

Contact : +(66) 24570068 Ext 5304

E-mail : whter.ices.pr@gmail.comm, whter.ices2013@gmail.com

Organizer: Siam University – Hotel & Tourism Management Programs


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Global Jewellery Market to Surpass USD 272 Billion Revenues by 2018 Says TechSci Research

Posted on 11 March 2013 by Africa Business

Increasing population, rising household income and changing lifestyle in Asia Pacific and Middle Eastern region to drive global jewellery market revenues in the next decade.

 

Vancouver, Canada –(PR.com)– According to recently published report “Global Gems and Jewellery Market Forecast & Opportunities, 2018”, in 2012, United States generated maximum revenues in the global jewellery market. The country is also the largest consumer for diamonds globally.

However, regionally Asia Pacific holds the largest jewellery market in the world with more than half of the share being contributed by India and China alone. India and China are also the two largest gold consumers in the world followed by the Middle Eastern region. Other countries in Asia pacific such as Thailand and Vietnam are also large consumers of gold and the driving the regional growth of the market.

China is the world’s largest platinum consumer followed by Japan. India accounts for more than half of the world’s diamond processing industry and is the world’s largest importer of rough diamonds and largest re-exporter of diamonds.

The jewellery market in the developing regions is made up of several small family run businesses which make up for a large unorganized market. Even though, multinational companies are operating jewellery chains across most of the regions which contribute to the global jewellery market’s organized sector, but the market still governed for a large unorganized sector. The market is somewhat more organized in the developed regions such as North America and Europe. The markets in Middle East and Asia pacific are the fastest growing markets in the world and are now contributing to the maximum jewellery demand.

The market is also experiencing trends such as implementation of CAD (Computer Aided Designing) and RP (Rapid Prototyping) for enhancing the production procedures. The market for imitation jewellery is an emerging segment and is growing fast all across the world. Factors such as increasing population, rising household incomes, changing lifestyles are constantly contributing to the increasing demand of jewellery products across the globe.

According to a recently published report by TechSci Research “Global Gems and Jewellery Market Forecast and Opportunities, 2018”, the gold jewellery market currently accounts for 43% of the global jewellery market. Given the increasing disposable incomes and growing markets in the Asia Pacific and Middle East regions, the market is set to expand immensely. TechSci Research estimates the global jewellery market to grow beyond USD 272 Billion by 2018, growing at a CAGR of over 5%.

The jewellery market is further classified into segments such as gold, diamond, platinum and other categories such as silver , imitation jewellery, colored gems and precious stones etc. In 2012, gold jewellery market dominated the industry in terms of value. But, diamond jewellery and other types of jewellery are set to grow rapidly over the coming years.

The report “Global Gems and Jewellery Market Forecast and Opportunities, 2018” has analyzed the growth potential of jewellery segments across various regions in the world and provides statistics and information on market sizes, shares and trends. The report will suffice in providing the intending clients with cutting-edge market intelligence and help them in taking sound investment decisions. Besides, the report also identifies and analyzes the emerging trends along with essential drivers and key challenges faced by the industry.

Contact Information
TechSci Research
Arpita Sharma
+1 646 360 1656
Contact
www.techsciresearch.com
2950, Boundary Road,
Burnaby, British Columbia,
Canada – VM5 3Z9
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Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness Markets Set to Top US$ One Trillion in 2030

Posted on 06 March 2013 by Africa Business

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Africa has the potential to create a trillion-dollar food market
  • But farmers need better access to help them grow and trade their products
  • A new report outlines challenges and solutions to Africa’s Agriculture and Agribusiness sectors

WASHINGTON –A new World Bank report “Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness,” says that Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods.  The report calls on governments to work side-by-side with agribusinesses, to link farmers with consumers in an increasingly urbanized Africa.

“The time has come for making African agriculture and agribusiness a catalyst for ending poverty,” says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa Region. “We cannot overstate the importance of agriculture to Africa’s determination to maintain and boost its high growth rates, create more jobs, significantly reduce poverty, and grow enough cheap, nutritious food to feed its families, export its surplus crops, while safeguarding the continent’s environment.”

New Findings

Good prospects: Africa’s food and beverage markets are projected to reach $1 trillion by 2030. By way of comparison, the current size of the market is $313 billion, offering the prospect of a three-fold increase, bringing more jobs, greater prosperity, less hunger, and significantly more opportunity enabling African farmers to compete globally.

Performance boost needed: Africa’s agriculture and agribusinesses are underperforming.  Many developing countries such as Brazil, Indonesia, and Thailand now export more food products than all of Sub-Saharan Africa combined.  Even as export shares are falling, import of food products is rising.  The report argues that these adverse trends can be reversed through good policies, sustained public-private investment, and strong public-private partnerships backed by open, transparent procedures and processes along the entire value chain.

Untapped land and water: Africa has more than half of the world’s fertile yet unused land.  Africa uses only two percent of its renewable water resources compared to the global average of five percent.  Post-harvest losses run 15 to 20 percent for cereals and are higher for perishable products due to poor storage and other farm infrastructure.

While pointing to the need for significant investment in infrastructure the report carries an unequivocal warning: in the rush to allocate land for agribusiness, care needs to be taken so that acquisitions do not threaten people’s livelihoods and land purchases or leases are conducted according to ethical and socially responsible standards, including recognizing local users’ rights, holding consultations with local communities, and paying fair market-rate compensation for land acquired.

Adding Value

The report took an in-depth look at entire value chains – the process for taking products from farms to markets – for five commodities, rice, maize, cocoa, dairy and green beans.  Africa is the world’s leading importer and consumer of rice, paying US$3.5 billion for import bills. By increasing rice production, Senegal can help meet local demand but more capital is needed together with greater investment in irrigation and easing restrictions on access to land. Ghana, another top importer, produces more varieties of rice but at significantly higher cost.

“Improving Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness sectors means higher incomes and more jobs. It also allows Africa to compete globally. Today, Brazil, Indonesia and Thailand each export more food products than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined.  This must change,” says Jamal Saghir, World Bank Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region.

Success Story

Although much of Eastern and Southern Africa is well suited to dairy production, only Kenya has established a competitive dairy industry. Kenya’s industry is based partly on a formal sector for processed milk and other dairy products, but its dynamic informal sector (based mostly on raw milk) is even more important, supplying over 80 percent of the market. Kenya’s success largely comes from the entrepreneurship of smallholders’ who choose high milk-yielding cross-bred cattle, improved feeds and paid better attention to animal health.  Also, Kenya success points to the importance of improving linkages to the formal sector through cooperative milk collection and milk cooling centers. Even though challenges remain government policy, especially flexibility in setting quality and safety standards for the informal chain were vital.

Looking Ahead

The report says agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. Strong leadership and commitment from both public and private sectors is needed.  For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors is critical, as is the need for strengthening of safeguards, land administration systems, and screening investments for sustainable growth.  Concluding on an upbeat note, the report says Africa can draw on many local successes to guide governments and investors toward positive economic, social and environmental outcomes.

“African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa.  “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

 

Source: WorldBank.org

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Africa’s Food Markets Could Create One Trillion Dollar Opportunity by 2030

Posted on 06 March 2013 by Africa Business

WASHINGTON, March, 2013 - Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods, and if African governments can work more closely with agribusinesses to feed the region’s fast-growing urban population, according to a new World Bank report launched today.

According to the Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness report, Africa’s food systems, currently valued at US$313 billion a year from agriculture, could triple if governments and business leaders radically rethink their policies and support to agriculture, farmers, and agribusinesses, which together account for nearly 50 percent of Africa’s economic activity.

The time has come for making African agriculture and agribusiness a catalyst for ending poverty,” says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa Region. “We cannot overstate the importance of agriculture to Africa’s determination to maintain and boost its high growth rates, create more jobs, significantly reduce poverty, and grow enough cheap, nutritious food to feed its families, export its surplus crops, while safeguarding the continent’s environment.”

Agribusiness: strong growth opportunities

Due to a combination of population growth, rising incomes and urbanization, strong demand is driving global food and agricultural prices higher.  Supply issues – slowing yield growth of major food crops, slowdown in research spending, land degradation and water scarcity issues, and a changing climate all mean that prices will remain high.  In this new market climate, Africa has great potential for expanding its food and agricultural exports.

Africa holds almost 50 percent of the world’s uncultivated land which is suited for growing food crops, comprising as many as 450 million hectares that are not forested, protected, or densely populated. Africa uses less than 2 percent of its renewable water sources, compared to a world average of five percent. Its harvests routinely yield far less than their potential and, for mainstay food crops such as maize the yield gap is as wide as 60 to 80 percent. Post-harvest losses run 15 to 20 percent for cereals and are higher for perishable products due to poor storage and other farm infrastructure.

African countries can tap into booming markets in rice, maize, soybeans, sugar, palm oil, biofuel and feedstock and emerge as major exporters of these commodities on world markets similar to the successes scored by Latin America and Southeast Asia.  For Sub-Saharan Africa, the most dynamic sectors are likely to be rice, feed grains, poultry, dairy, vegetable oils, horticulture and processed foods to supply domestic markets.

The report cautions that even as land will be needed for some agribusiness investments, such acquisitions can threaten people’s livelihoods and create local opposition unless land purchases or leases are conducted according to ethical and socially responsible standards, including recognizing local users’ rights, thorough consultations with local communities, and fair market-rate compensation for land acquired.

Improving Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness sectors means higher incomes and more jobs. It also allows Africa to compete globally. Today, Brazil, Indonesia and Thailand each export more food products than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined.  This must change,” says Jamal Saghir, World Bank Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region.

Value Chains are essential

Rice: Africa has become a major consumer and importer of rice, and Africans import half the rice they eat and pay top dollar for it, $3.5 billion per year and more.  Ghana and Senegal are significant importers.  Senegal is competitive among its neighbors, but it is held back by the difficulty farmers have in accessing land, capital, finance for irrigation expansion and appropriate crop varieties.  Ghana produces fewer varieties of rice than Senegal, but at significantly higher cost, and levies 40 percent tariffs and other charges on imports. Poor grain quality, cleanliness and packaging are major deterrents for consumers constraining the sector’s performance.

Maize: A food staple for many Africans, maize is grown on 25 million hectares or 14 percent of cropped land. In Zambia where people eat on average 133 kilograms of cereals a year, maize provides half the calories in their diets.  Zambia is competitive when importing maize but fails on exports.  High transport costs, higher labor costs and lower yields combine to increase costs by one-third compared to Thailand, a major international producer of rain-fed maize.  The report argues that Zambia’s future competitiveness depends on raising yields, reducing costs, and removing disincentives for the private sector in markets and trade.

In addition, the study reviewed value chains for cocoa in Ghana and dairy and green beans in Kenya.

African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa.  “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

Solutions

Agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. The report calls for strong leadership and commitment for both public and private sectors.  As comparators, the report cites case studies from Uruguay, Indonesia and Malaysia. For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors is critical, as is the strengthening of safeguards, land administration systems, and screening investments for sustainable growth.

The report notes that Africa can also draw on many local successes to guide governments and investors toward positive economic, social and environmental outcomes.

 

Source: WorldBank.org

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Illegal Trade Robs Wild of Almost 3,000 Great Apes Annually, Threatening Populations / Released at CITES Meeting, New UNEP Report Links Ape Traffic to Organized Crime

Posted on 04 March 2013 by Africa Business

About GRASP

The Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP) is an innovative and ambitious partnership comprised of great ape range states with an immediate challenge: to lift the threat of imminent extinction faced by gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans across their ranges in equatorial Africa and Southeast Asia. Visit the GRASP website here: http://www.un-grasp.org/

 

BANGKOK, Thailand, March 4, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The illegal trade that sees almost 3,000 live great apes lost from the forests of Africa and Southeast Asia each year is increasingly impacting wild populations as links to organized crime grow stronger.

 

Stolen Apes: The Illicit Trade in Chimpanzees, Gorillas, Bonobos and Orangutans is the first report to analyze the scale and scope of the illegal trade and highlights the growing links to sophisticated trans-boundary crime networks, which law enforcement networks are struggling to contain.

 

Stolen Apes, which was produced by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) through the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP), estimates that a minimum of 22,218 great apes have been lost from the wild since 2005 – either sold, killed during the hunt, or dying in captivity – with chimpanzees comprising 64 per cent of that number.

 

The report examines confiscation records, international trade databases, law enforcement reports, and arrival rates from sanctuaries and rehabilitation centers between 2005 and 2011.

 

Stolen Apes says that each great ape confiscated or confirmed in the illegal trade represents many more that died either during the capture or the trafficking process.

Over the past seven years, a minimum of 643 chimpanzees, 48 bonobos, 98 gorillas and 1,019 orangutans are documented to have been captured from the wild for illegal trade. These figures are just the tip of the iceberg, and extrapolating from this research the report estimates that at least 2,972 great apes are lost from the wild each year.

 

“The taking of great apes from the wild is not new – it has gone on for well over a century,” said Achim Steiner, UN Under-Secretary-General and UNEP Executive Director. “But the current scale outlined in this report underlines how important it is that the international community and the organizations responsible for conserving endangered species remain vigilant, keeping a step ahead of those seeking to profit from such illegal activities.”

All great apes are endangered and protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) as Appendix I animals.

Yet Stolen Apes reveals that the illegal trade has shifted from being a by-product of traditional conservation threats such as deforestation, mining and bush-meat hunting to a more sophisticated business driven by demand from international markets.

These markets include the tourist entertainment industry, disreputable zoos, and wealthy individuals who want exotic pets as status symbols. Great apes are used to attract tourists to entertainment facilities such as amusement parks and circuses. They are even used in tourist photo sessions on Mediterranean beaches and boxing matches in Asian safari parks.

Since 2007, standing orders from zoos and private owners in Asia have spurred the export of over 130 chimpanzees and 10 gorillas under falsified permits from Guinea alone, an enterprise that requires a coordinated trading network through Central and West Africa. A safari park in Thailand admitted in 2006 that it acquired at least 54 orangutans from the forests of Borneo and Sumatra.

“It is important to establish baseline figures for the illegal trade in great apes, even if these numbers only hint at the devastation,” said Doug Cress, coordinator of GRASP. “Great apes are extremely important for the health of forests in Africa and Asia, and even the loss of 10 or 20 at a time can have a deep impact on biodiversity.”

The illicit trade is increasingly linked to organized crime, and sophisticated trans-boundary networks now move great apes along with other contraband such as ivory, arms, drugs, rhino horn and laundered money. A smuggler recently apprehended in Cameroon was transporting a live chimpanzee wedged between sacks of marijuana.

Profit margins are high for the criminal networks. The report found that a poacher may sell a live chimpanzee for US$50, whereas the middleman will resell that same chimpanzee at a mark-up of as much as 400 per cent.

Orangutans can fetch US$1,000 at re-sale, and gorillas illegally sold to a zoo in Malaysia in 2002 reportedly went for US$400,000 each.

“The illegal trade in apes has little to do with poverty,” said Ofir Drori, founder of the Last Great Ape Organization in Cameroon. “It is instead generated by the rich and powerful.”

Law enforcement efforts lag far behind the rates of illegal trade. Only 27 arrests were made in Africa and Asia in connection with great ape trade between 2005 and 2011, and one-fourth of the arrests were never prosecuted.

 

The report also found that the loss of natural great ape ranges in Africa and Asia helps drive the illegal trade, as it promotes contact and conflict between apes and humans. Great ape habitat is being lost at the rate of 2-5 per cent annually. By 2030 less than 10 per cent of the current range will remain on current trends.

In Southeast Asia, the conversion of rainforest for agro-industry is directly linked to the illegal trade, as orangutans are flushed from the forest and end up being captured, killed, or trafficked. Extractive industries such as logging, mining, and petroleum exploration create transportation and trade routes that facilitate the illicit traffic of great apes.

Key Recommendations from the Report

As well as highlighting the scale of the problem and the worrying trend of increasing organization of the trade, the report issues a series of recommendations aimed at reducing the startling rate of decline of ape populations, including:

• Establish an electronic database that includes the numbers, trends and tendencies of the illegal great ape trade, and monitor arrests, prosecutions and convictions as a means of assessing national commitment.

 

• Target organized crime by investigating traffickers and buyers, establishing trans-national criminal intelligence units targeting environmental crime to ensure that intelligence is compiled, analyzed and shared with national police forces, customs and INTERPOL, and prosecuting the accused to the fullest extent of the law.

 

• Utilize national and international multimedia campaigns to eliminate the trade/ownership/use of great apes and emphasize laws and deterrent punishment.

 

• DNA-test all confiscated great apes and return to country of origin – if discernible – within eight weeks of confiscation.

 

• Review national laws and penalties relating to the killing and trafficking of great apes and support efforts to forcefully implement and strengthen those laws.

 

• Increase enforcement of protected areas, to both reduce illegal trade in great apes and to protect their habitat.

FURTHER RESOURCES

Download the full report here: http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/apes/

SOURCE

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

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Africa’s Food Markets Could Create One Trillion Dollar Opportunity by 2030

Posted on 04 March 2013 by Africa Business

WASHINGTON, March 4, 2013/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Africa’s farmers and agribusinesses could create a trillion-dollar food market by 2030 if they can expand their access to more capital, electricity, better technology and irrigated land to grow high-value nutritious foods, and if African governments can work more closely with agribusinesses to feed the region’s fast-growing urban population, according to a new World Bank report launched today.

 

According to the Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusinessreport, Africa’s food systems, currently valued at US$313 billion a year from agriculture, could triple if governments and business leaders radically rethink their policies and support to agriculture, farmers, and agribusinesses, which together account for nearly 50 percent of Africa’s economic activity.

 

“The time has come for making African agriculture and agribusiness a catalyst for ending poverty,” says Makhtar Diop, World Bank Vice President for Africa Region. “We cannot overstate the importance of agriculture to Africa’s determination to maintain and boost its high growth rates, create more jobs, significantly reduce poverty, and grow enough cheap, nutritious food to feed its families, export its surplus crops, while safeguarding the continent’s environment.”

 

Agribusiness: strong growth opportunities

 

Due to a combination of population growth, rising incomes and urbanization, strong demand is driving global food and agricultural prices higher. Supply issues – slowing yield growth of major food crops, slowdown in research spending, land degradation and water scarcity issues, and a changing climate all mean that prices will remain high. In this new market climate, Africa has great potential for expanding its food and agricultural exports.

 

Africa holds almost 50 percent of the world’s uncultivated land which is suited for growing food crops, comprising as many as 450 million hectares that are not forested, protected, or densely populated. Africa uses less than 2 percent of its renewable water sources, compared to a world average of five percent. Its harvests routinely yield far less than their potential and, for mainstay food crops such as maize the yield gap is as wide as 60 to 80 percent. Post-harvest losses run 15 to 20 percent for cereals and are higher for perishable products due to poor storage and other farm infrastructure.

 

African countries can tap into booming markets in rice, maize, soybeans, sugar, palm oil, biofuel and feedstock and emerge as major exporters of these commodities on world markets similar to the successes scored by Latin America and Southeast Asia. For Sub-Saharan Africa, the most dynamic sectors are likely to be rice, feed grains, poultry, dairy, vegetable oils, horticulture and processed foods to supply domestic markets.

 

The report cautions that even as land will be needed for some agribusiness investments, such acquisitions can threaten people’s livelihoods and create local opposition unless land purchases or leases are conducted according to ethical and socially responsible standards, including recognizing local users’ rights, thorough consultations with local communities, and fair market-rate compensation for land acquired.

 

“Improving Africa’s agriculture and agribusiness sectors means higher incomes and more jobs. It also allows Africa to compete globally. Today, Brazil, Indonesia and Thailand each export more food products than all of sub-Saharan Africa combined. This must change,” says Jamal Saghir, World Bank Director for Sustainable Development in the Africa Region.

 

Value Chains are essential

 

Rice: Africa has become a major consumer and importer of rice, and Africans import half the rice they eat and pay top dollar for it, $3.5 billion per year and more. Ghana and Senegal are significant importers. Senegal is competitive among its neighbors, but it is held back by the difficulty farmers have in accessing land, capital, finance for irrigation expansion and appropriate crop varieties. Ghana produces fewer varieties of rice than Senegal, but at significantly higher cost, and levies 40 percent tariffs and other charges on imports. Poor grain quality, cleanliness and packaging are major deterrents for consumers constraining the sector’s performance.

 

Maize: A food staple for many Africans, maize is grown on 25 million hectares or 14 percent of cropped land. In Zambia where people eat on average 133 kilograms of cereals a year, maize provides half the calories in their diets. Zambia is competitive when importing maize but fails on exports. High transport costs, higher labor costs and lower yields combine to increase costs by one-third compared to Thailand, a major international producer of rain-fed maize. The report argues that Zambia’s future competitiveness depends on raising yields, reducing costs, and removing disincentives for the private sector in markets and trade.

 

In addition, the study reviewed value chains for cocoa in Ghana and dairy and green beans in Kenya.

 

“African farmers and businesses must be empowered through good policies, increased public and private investments and strong public-private partnerships,” says Gaiv Tata, World Bank Director for Financial and Private Sector Development in Africa. “A strong agribusiness sector is vital for Africa’s economic future.”

 

Solutions

 

Agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. The report calls for strong leadership and commitment for both public and private sectors. As comparators, the report cites case studies from Uruguay, Indonesia and Malaysia. For success, engaging with strategic “good practice” investors is critical, as is the strengthening of safeguards, land administration systems, and screening investments for sustainable growth.

 

The report notes that Africa can also draw on many local successes to guide governments and investors toward positive economic, social and environmental outcomes.

 

SOURCE

The World Bank

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A.M. Best Affirms Ratings of General Insurance Corporation of India

Posted on 22 February 2013 by Africa Business

HONG KONG — A.M. Best Asia-Pacific Limited has affirmed the financial strength rating of A- (Excellent) and issuer credit rating of “a-” of General Insurance Corporation of India (GIC Re) (India). The outlook for both ratings is stable.

The ratings reflect GIC Re’s strong risk-adjusted capitalization and its prominent business profile in the Indian and overseas reinsurance markets.

GIC Re’s capital and surplus amounted to INR 247.6 billion for fiscal year 2011-12, which was a decrease of 13.5% from INR 286.4 billion for 2010-11. GIC Re’s capitalization, as measured by Best’s Capital Adequacy Ratio (BCAR), also weakened in fiscal year 2011-12, mainly due to capital provisioning against the Indian Motor Third Party Insurance Pool (IMTPIP) and natural catastrophe losses in 2011-12. Nonetheless, GIC Re continued to maintain low underwriting leverage and sound liquidity. GIC Re’s capitalization is adequate for its current rating level.

GIC Re is the sole domestic reinsurer in India and continues to influence the underwriting discipline of the domestic market through its market leadership. GIC Re emphasizes its customer relationship management and offers risk rating services to its Indian and overseas clients.

Despite the worsened underwriting performance for fiscal year 2011-12, GIC Re continues to show improvement in its expense ratio, mainly attributed to the decreasing trend in the net commission ratio as a result of continuous reductions in flat commission and the introduction into profit commission.

Offsetting these positive rating factors is GIC Re’s high exposure to equity market volatility and increasing catastrophe exposure.

GIC Re is subject to high investment risk predominantly due to a high proportion of investment in equity securities. As at March 2012, the market value of GIC Re’s equity investment was around 40% of its total assets.
Volatility in the Indian equity market can have a direct impact on GIC Re’s capitalization level through the fair value change account.

GIC Re’s catastrophe exposure has increased in recent years, as a result of the growth in its domestic and overseas business. Global natural catastrophes that occurred in 2011, including the Thailand Flood, Christchurch and Japanese earthquakes, had a material impact on GIC Re’s underwriting result.

Future upward rating actions could occur if GIC Re demonstrates the ability to achieve a consistently favorable underwriting and operating performance, improve its risk-adjusted capitalization and strengthen its investment, underwriting and catastrophe risk management capability.
Conversely, negative rating actions could occur if the company’s risk-adjusted capitalization declines to a level below A.M. Best’s expectations, or if the company’s operating performance deteriorates significantly.

The methodology used in determining these ratings is Best’s Credit Rating Methodology, which provides a comprehensive explanation of A.M. Best’s rating process and contains the different rating criteria employed in the rating process. Key criteria utilized include: “Risk Management and the Rating Process for Insurance Companies”; “Evaluating Country Risk”; “Catastrophe Analysis in A.M. Best Ratings”; and “Understanding Universal BCAR.” Best’s Credit Rating Methodology can be found at www.ambest.com/ratings/methodology.

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World Conference on Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research & International Convention & Expo Summit 2013 (WHTER & ICES 2013)

Posted on 12 February 2013 by Africa Business

Siam University, International program in Hospitality and Tourism Management are proud to be the first university in Thailand hosting the World Conference on Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research & International Convention & Expo Summit 2013 (WHTER & ICES 2013) on 25th – 28th May 2013 at the Millennium Hilton Bangkok Hotel. Siam University will bring in over 300 delegates from all over the world to keep up with International academics’ view and cutting-edge ideas in Hospitality, Tourism and Event Research. This 2-in-1 conference will be themed as “Academics meet industry”.

“This is a very special occasion, because this is the first time the ICES will be held in Thailand. Moreover, it is a great honor for Siam University to be the first to hold such an event. WHTER and ICES 2013 will allow the exchange of  ideas and perspectives from industry and researchers in order to develop a better understanding of the MICE industry” Assoc. Prof. Dr. Bongkosh  N. Rittichainuwat, Director Program Hotel & Tourism Management

This year’s conference features panel sessions and keynote speakers on a various topics from academic institutes and industries, such as academic professionals, Prof. Kaye Chon, Dean of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Asia Pacific Travel Tourism Association, Mr. Bert Van Walbeek, Chairman, PATA Thailand Chapter, as well as prominent journal, Prof. Chris Ryan, editor-in-Chief, Tourism Management.

 

At the same time, Siam University aims to meet international delegates from Europe, United States and Asia Pacific to share the qualities of hospitality, tourism and event research, research to create global connection. Researchers and academic professors are invited to present their papers and attend this conference. The winner of WHTER Best Paper Award & ICES Best Paper Award will have his/her paper published in the Tourism Management, the Journal of Convention & Event Tourism & International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management.

Example journals: http://ices2013.wix.com/siamu#!best-paper-awards/c46e

 

Siam University has chosen the Millennium Hilton Bangkok Hotel as the conference venue with its impressive meeting and dining facilities able to accommodate up to 700 people. Conference dinners will be held at signature restaurants such as Blue Elephant & Royal Thai Navy Hall. These venues once welcomed royal families, presidents, and prime ministers of different countries around the world.

 

For details concerning the paper presentation and other lodging information, please click onto the official website of WHTER & ICES 2013 at http://ices2013.wix.com/siamu

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Nearly Half of the World’s Entrepreneurs Are Between The Ages Of 25-44 According To Global Entrepreneurship Report

Posted on 22 January 2013 by Africa Business

Babson sponsored research finds increased demand for entrepreneurial training

WELLESLEY, Mass., Jan., 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) 2012 Global Report estimates that nearly half of the world’s entrepreneurs are between the ages of 25 and 44. The survey also reports that, in all geographic regions surveyed, 25-34 year olds showed the highest rates of entrepreneurial activity.

“Although most of the entrepreneurs tend to fall into the early to mid-career age ranges, we see people participating in entrepreneurship at all ages,” commented Donna Kelley, co-author of the report and Associate Professor of Entrepreneurship at Babson College. “Encouragingly, in every part of the world, youth are starting businesses as well as those in their late careers. Given this broad spectrum of participation, some economies may be well-served by looking more closely at certain age groups in order to determine how to encourage and support entrepreneurial activity. Whether it be educated youth in a society unable to find jobs to apply their skills, mid-career workers suddenly unemployed, retirees wanting or needing to continue earning income, or individuals of any age that recognize opportunities and have the desire to be entrepreneurs, people have particular strengths they can leverage at various points in their careers, but they are likely to need different training and resources to effectively engage in entrepreneurial pursuits.”

The Latin America/Caribbean and sub-Saharan African regions tend toward older entrepreneurs, with one-third falling into the 45-64 age range. In Europe, on the other hand, the non-EU economies report, on average, that half of the entrepreneurs are between 18-34 years of age. China was also distinct in claiming a high proportion of young entrepreneurs, with 57 percent between 18 and 34 years of age.

Unveiled today at the GEM Annual Meeting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, this is the 14th annual survey of entrepreneurship worldwide and is the largest single study of its kind.

The GEM Global report is authored by Siri Roland Xavier , Associate Professor, Deputy Dean and Program Director for Entrepreneurship, Bank Rakyat School of Business and Entrepreneurship, University Tun Abdul Razak in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Donna Kelley , Associate Professor of Entrepreneurship, Babson College, Wellesley, MA, USA; Jacqui Kew , Senior Lecturer, College of Accounting, University of Cape Town (UCT), Cape Town, South Africa; Mike Herrington , Director, UCT Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Graduate School of Business, Cape Town, South Africa; and Arne Vorderwulbecke, Research Fellow and Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Economic and Cultural Geography, Leibniz Universitat, Germany.

In the late spring and early summer of 2012, more than 198,000 adults in 69 economies took part in the GEM survey. With the largest sample to date, this group of economies represented an estimated 74 percent of the world’s population and 87 percent of the GDP.

The GEM 2012 Global Report also looked at cultural attitudes about entrepreneurship. Perceptions about entrepreneurial opportunities, capabilities, fear of failure, and intent to start a business are key predictors of entrepreneurial activity around the world. “We are finding that entrepreneurship education and media attention about entrepreneurs may have a lasting effect on cultural attitudes about entrepreneurship,” Kelley stated.

Visit the Babson Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Reports Website to access the full report.

Among The Report’s Key Findings:

Perceived Opportunities and Capabilities

  • Entrepreneurs in sub-Saharan Africa ─ factor-driven economies in the earliest stage of economic development ─ had high perceptions about good opportunities for starting businesses within six months (70 percent), and beliefs that they have the skills and knowledge necessary to start businesses (76 percent). Their high Total Entrepreneurship Activity rates (TEA) are consistent with these positive attitudes.
  • Positive attitudes are higher in Latin America than in non-European Union economies. Both regions are within the middle-stage efficiency-driven group of economies (developing economies where industrialization has taken hold). This difference shows how attitudes towards entrepreneurship are shaped by more than a country’s level of economic development.
  • Noticeable variations in attitudes can be seen within geographic regions. The wealthier economies in the AsiaPacific/ South Asia regions ─ Japan, Republic of Korea, and Singapore ─ show lower than average opportunity and capability perceptions while earlier development-stage countries like China, Pakistan, and Thailand scored above average.
  • As economies develop, perceived opportunities and capabilities tend to decline. Perceived opportunities were almost twice as high in factor-driven vs. innovation-driven economies.

“The GEM Global report clearly shows that perceptions are critical. GEM looks at perceived opportunities, perceived capabilities, and intentions to start a business. We measure and analyze the differences among a wide range of geographic regions and economic levels,” said the report’s coauthor Mike Herrington .

Fear of Failure

  • Economies in sub-Saharan Africa had the lowest levels, with just 24 percent reporting that fear of failure would prevent them from starting new businesses. Latin America and the Caribbean economies were also confident with only 28 percent stating fear of failure concerns.
  • Fear of failure increases as economies move from early-stage to advanced development levels. Malawi (12 percent) has the lowest rate while Greece (61 percent) and Italy (58 percent) reported peak levels.

Entrepreneurial Intentions

  • Intentions are highest (48 percent) in factor-driven economies (characterized by low-cost labor, natural resources, exports) and decrease significantly in the efficiency-driven (26 percent) and innovation-driven groups (11 percent).
  • The sub-Saharan Africa region ranked highest in intentions (53 percent) among every geographic region in the world.
  • Positive perceptions about opportunities do not always translate into starting businesses. 30 percent of respondents in Asia saw opportunities but only 17 percent expect to actually start businesses in the next three years.

Beliefs About Entrepreneurship

  • Entrepreneurship as a good career choice and the belief that it is a high status choice, or one that receives media recognition, varied among cultures and regions. There were high rankings for these attitudes in the Latin America/Caribbean, Middle East/North Africa (MENA), and sub-Saharan Africa regions.
  • European Union (EU) attitudes were lower. Only half of the respondents agreed that entrepreneurship was a good career choice and received positive media attention still, two-thirds think of entrepreneurship as a high-status profession.

Entrepreneurial Activity

  • Total Entrepreneurial Activity (TEA) measures the percentage of adults (ages 18 -64) who are nascent (potential) or new entrepreneurs. TEA rates are higher in economies with low GDP per capita and lower in high GDP economies. This ratio corresponds with high levels of necessity-entrepreneurship (no other work options available) in low GDP countries while high GDP countries exhibit higher levels of opportunity-motivations.
  • At 27 percent, Zambia (sub-Saharan Africa) and Ecuador (Latin America/Caribbean) submitted highest TEA rates in these regions. The Asia Pacific/South Asia region showed a mix of TEA levels with Thailand (19 percent and China (13 percent) leading the way.
  • Innovation-driven economies have more established business owners than entrepreneurs. Greece, Spain, Switzerland, Ireland, and Finland in the EU; and Japan, Republic of Korea, and Taiwan in Asia have one-third more established business owners than entrepreneurs. Non-EU and MENA groups have low rates of both TEA and established business ownership while sub-Saharan Africa has high rates of both.
  • Business discontinuance also varied across regions. Lack of financing was the most common cause in sub-Saharan Africa, but was less an issue in Asia. Respondents in the USA and EU cited other jobs or business opportunities as reasons for business discontinuance.

Necessity and Opportunity Driven Entrepreneurs

  • In factor-driven economies, the proportion of entrepreneurs with necessity-driven motives generally declines, while improvement-driven opportunities (to improve income or independence) increase.
  • Geography also plays a part. Latin America/Caribbean and non-EU economies are both efficiency-driven, but the Latin America/Caribbean region reported twice as many entrepreneurs with improvement-driven opportunity motives than those with necessity motives. In contrast, non-EU countries show equal levels of either motive.

Gender Differences

  • Entrepreneurship activity among men and women was almost equal in most sub-Saharan Africa economies, while men were 2.8 times as likely to start a business than women in the MENA region.
  • In Egypt, Palestine, and Korea, less than one-fifth of all entrepreneurs were women. Only 5 percent of entrepreneurs in Pakistan were women.
  • Ecuador and Panama, Ghana and Nigeria, and Thailand were the only economies where the female TEA rate was higher than that for males.

Growth Expectations

  • Despite low TEA rates among non-EU countries, nearly a fifth of their entrepreneurs expect to hire 20 or more employees in the next five years.
  • The USA reported a high proportion of entrepreneurs projecting 20 or more new hires and also boasts a high TEA rate among innovation-driven economies.
  • Singapore, China, and Colombia also displayed both high TEA rates and high proportions of 20 plus growth entrepreneurs compared to others in their regions.

Entrepreneurship Framework Conditions

GEM interviewed country experts about the kinds of Entrepreneurship Framework Conditions (EFCs) – from education and national policy to internal markets and infrastructure systems – that will contribute to a healthy environment for entrepreneurship.

  • Overall, physical infrastructure was identified as a positive factor in nearly every economy and region. Internal market dynamics (the level of change in markets) was viewed as positive by most of sub-Saharan Africa, MENA, Asia Pacific/South Asia, and non-EU economies. A more negative outlook on market dynamics was found in Latin America/Caribbean, the EU, and the USA.
  • Most GEM economies see a need for improved entrepreneurship education at the primary and secondary levels. Entrepreneurial finance was another condition frequently cited as negative, but particularly in the Latin America/Caribbean region.
  • Experts in the USA saw cultural and social norms as positive, while only one EU economy identified this condition favorably. The USA also rated R&D transfer positively, while sub-Saharan Africa and many economies saw this condition as negative.

Entrepreneurship and Migration

In 2012, GEM included questions around the special topic of international migration. Currently there are more than 210 million international migrants with increases expected in the next ten years. Migrant entrepreneurs have the potential to contribute substantially to their societies through knowledge and information transfer, global trade, and job creation.

  • Migrants exhibit a higher rate of entrepreneurship than non-migrants in innovation and factor-driven economies. Efficiency-driven economies showed an opposite pattern with lower TEA rates among migrant entrepreneurs.
  • 25 percent of migrant entrepreneurs (non-migrants 16 percent) in efficiency-driven economies expect to create 10 or more jobs; 23 percent (non-migrants 9 percent) in factor-driven economies; and 20 percent (non-migrants 14 percent) in innovation-driven economies.
  • More than half of migrant entrepreneurs said they sell products and services outside their host economy. This pattern was similar in innovation-driven economies but less so in factor-driven economies.

Policy Implications

GEM researchers offer several guidelines for policy makers, entrepreneurs, and academics to help them build entrepreneurial eco-systems that enable entrepreneurship to flourish in every world economy.

  • Develop policies to promote societal attitude changes about women; and that train, support and encourage women entrepreneurs.
  • Create special entrepreneurial support tools and programs for entrepreneurs of different ages.
  • Re-engage former entrepreneurs and leverage their wealth of experience in mentoring new entrepreneurs.
  • Implement policies to encourage youth entrepreneurship, especially in high un-employment regions such as sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Encourage national and global efforts to improve entrepreneurship education in primary and secondary schools.
  • Help economies to recognize the value migrants provide in creating jobs and globalizing the business environment.
  • Urge governments to enforce a strong rule of law to maintain the quality of entrepreneurial entries. GEM also stresses the importance of developing legal frameworks in which entrepreneurship can thrive.

“Entrepreneurship creates employment and adds economic value for economies everywhere. But this activity must be enacted in tandem with inclusiveness for all sections of society, because it is an effective way to encourage prosperity and peace,” said the report’s lead author Siri Roland Xavier .

GEM 2012 Global Report Sponsors
GEM 2012 Global Report sponsors are Babson College, Universidad Del Desarrollo, University Tun Abdul Razak, GERA and GEM. The Global Entrepreneurship Research Association (GERA) is, for constitutional and regulatory purposes, the umbrella organization that hosts the GEM project. GERA is an association formed of Babson College, London Business School and representatives of the Association of GEM national teams.

About GEM
The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) is a not-for-profit academic research consortium that has as its goal making high quality information on global entrepreneurship activity readily available to as wide an audience as possible. GEM is the largest single study of entrepreneurial activity in the world. Initiated in 1999 with just 10 countries, GEM has now conducted research in over 80 economies all over the world. Visit the Babson GEM Website or the GEM Consortium Website.

About Babson College
Babson College is the educator, convener, and thought leader for Entrepreneurship of All Kinds®. The College is a dynamic living and learning laboratory, where students, faculty, and staff work together to address the real-world problems of business and society—while at the same time evolving our methods and advancing our programs. We shape the leaders our world needs most: those with strong functional knowledge and the skills and vision to navigate change, accommodate ambiguity, surmount complexity, and motivate teams in a common purpose to create economic and social value. As we have for nearly a half-century, Babson continues to advance Entrepreneurial Thought and Action® as the most positive force on the planet for generating sustainable economic and social value. For information, visit the Babson College Website.

SOURCE Babson College

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United Arab Emirates Oil Markets, 2012

Posted on 02 November 2012 by Africa Business

NEW YORK, Nov., 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

United Arab Emirates Oil Markets, 2012

http://www.reportlinker.com/p0617070/United-Arab-Emirates-Oil-Markets-2012.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Oil_and_Gas_energy

United Arab Emirates Oil Markets, 2012

Summary

This profile is the essential source for top-level energy industry data and information. The report provides an overview of each of the key sub-segments of the energy industry in United Arab Emirates. It details the market structure, regulatory environment, infrastructure and provides historical and forecasted statistics relating to the supply/demand balance for each of the key sub-segments. It also provides information relating to the crude oil assets (oil fields, refineries, pipelines and storage terminals) in United Arab Emirates. The report compares the investment environment in United Arab Emirates with other countries in the region. The profiles of the major companies operating in the crude oil sector in United Arab Emirates together with the latest news and deals are also included in the report.

Scope

- Historic and forecast data relating to production, consumption, imports, exports and reserves are provided for each industry sub-segment for the period 2000-2020.

- Historical and forecast data and information for all the major oil fields, refineries, pipelines and storage terminals in United Arab Emirates for the period 2005-2016.

- Operator and equity details for major crude oil assets in United Arab Emirates.

- Key information relating to market regulations, key energy assets and the key companies operating in the United Arab Emirates’s energy industry.

- Information on the top companies in the United Arab Emirates including business description, strategic analysis, and financial information.

- Product and brand updates, strategy changes, R&D projects, corporate expansions and contractions and regulatory changes.

- Key mergers and acquisitions, partnerships, private equity and venture capital investments, and IPOs.

Reasons to buy

- Gain a strong understanding of the country’s energy market.

- Facilitate market analysis and forecasting of future industry trends.

- Facilitate decision making on the basis of strong historic and forecast production, reserves and capacity data.

- Assess your competitor’s major crude oil assets and their performance.

- Analyze the latest news and financial deals in the oil sector of each country.

- Develop strategies based on the latest operational, financial, and regulatory events.

- Do deals with an understanding of how competitors are financed, and the mergers and partnerships that have shaped the market.

- Identify and analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the leading companies in the country.

1 Table Of Contents

1 Table Of Contents 2

1.1 List of Tables 7

1.2 List of Figures 8

2 United Arab Emirates Energy Sector 9

2.1 United Arab Emirates Energy Sector, Market Overview 9

2.2 United Arab Emirates Energy Sector, Oil 9

2.2.1 United Arab Emirates Oil, Overview 9

2.2.2 United Arab Emirates Oil, Supply and Demand Balance 10

2.2.3 United Arab Emirates Crude Oil, Regulatory Structure 15

2.2.4 United Arab Emirates Crude Oil, Infrastructure 15

3 United Arab Emirates Oil Upstream Investment Environment Benchmarking 16

3.1 Introduction 16

3.2 The Overall Ranking 16

3.3 Oil Sector Performance 16

3.3.1 Exploration Activity 18

3.3.2 Oil Production 19

3.3.3 Oil Reserves 19

3.3.4 Consumption 19

3.3.5 Refining Industry 20

3.4 Economic Performance 20

3.4.1 GDP Growth Index 22

3.4.2 FDI Confidence Index 22

3.4.3 Balance of Trade Index 22

3.5 Socio-Political Performance 22

3.5.1 Democracy Index 24

3.5.2 Governance Index 24

4 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector 25

4.1 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Country Snapshot 25

4.1.1 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Key Data 25

4.1.2 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Crude Oil Assets Map 25

4.1.3 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Gross Crude Oil Production by Type 26

4.1.4 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Gross Crude Oil Production by Major Assets 27

4.1.5 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Market Share of Key Companies based on Gross Equity Weighted Crude Oil Production 28

4.2 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Gross Crude Oil Forecasts 29

4.2.1 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Gross Crude Oil Production Forecast 29

4.3 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Crude Oil Asset Details 30

4.3.1 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Active Major Crude Oil Asset Details 30

4.3.2 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Planned Major Crude Oil Asset Details 31

4.4 United Arab Emirates Exploration and Production Sector, Drilling and Production Updates 31

4.4.1 Oct 03, 2012: Exillon Energy Provides September 2012 Production Update 31

4.4.2 Sep 03, 2012: Exillon Energy Provides August 2012 Production Update 31

4.4.3 Apr 05, 2012: Exillon Energy Provides March 2012 Production Update 31

4.4.4 Feb 29, 2012: Freedom Energy Confirms Additional Middle East Trials 32

4.4.5 Jan 19, 2012: Dzheitune (Lam) 13/163 Well Tested At 1,584bopd With Added Perforations: Dragon Oil 32

5 United Arab Emirates FSO Industry 33

5.1 United Arab Emirates FSO Industry, FSO Capacity Details by Vessel 33

5.2 United Arab Emirates FSO Industry, FSO Vessel Specifications 33

6 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector 34

6.1 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector, Key Data 34

6.2 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector, An Overview 34

6.3 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector, Comparison of Key Crude Oil Pipeline Companies 34

6.4 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector, Petroleum Product Pipeline Companies 35

6.5 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector, Crude Oil Pipelines 36

6.6 United Arab Emirates Pipeline Sector, Petroleum Product Pipelines 37

7 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector 38

7.1 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, Key Data 38

7.2 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, An Overview 38

7.2.1 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, Total Refining Capacity 38

7.3 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, Capacity Market Share by Company 39

7.4 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity 40

7.5 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity 41

7.6 United Arab Emirates Refining Sector, Hydrocracking Capacity 41

8 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector 42

8.1 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector, Key Data 42

8.2 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector, An Overview 42

8.2.1 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector, Total Storage Capacity 42

8.2.2 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector, Storage Capacity Share by Area 43

8.3 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector, Capacity Market Share by Company 44

8.4 United Arab Emirates Oil and Chemicals Storage Sector, Storage Capacity 45

9 Profile of OJSC Rosneft Oil Company 48

9.1 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company, Key Information 48

9.2 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company, Company Overview 48

9.3 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company, Business Description 48

9.3.1 Business Overview 48

9.3.2 Exploration and Production 50

9.3.3 Other Activities 50

9.3.4 Refining, Marketing and Distribution 51

9.4 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 51

9.4.1 Overview 51

9.4.2 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company Strengths 52

9.4.3 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company Weaknesses 54

9.4.4 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company Opportunities 54

9.4.5 OJSC Rosneft Oil Company Threats 57

10 Profile of Abu Dhabi National Oil Company 59

10.1 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, Key Information 59

10.2 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, Company Overview 59

10.3 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, Business Description 59

10.3.1 Business Overview 59

10.3.2 Downstream Operations 60

10.3.3 Energy to Business 60

10.3.4 Energy to the Consumer 61

10.3.5 Marketing and Refining 61

10.3.6 Upstream Operations 61

10.4 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 62

10.4.1 Overview 62

10.4.2 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Strengths 62

10.4.3 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Weaknesses 64

10.4.4 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Opportunities 64

10.4.5 Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Threats 65

11 Profile of Dana Gas PJSC 67

11.1 Dana Gas PJSC, Key Information 67

11.2 Dana Gas PJSC, Company Overview 67

11.3 Dana Gas PJSC, Business Description 67

11.3.1 Business Overview 67

12 Financial Deals Landscape 69

12.1 Detailed Deal Summary 69

12.1.1 Acquisition 69

12.1.2 Equity Offerings 73

12.1.3 Debt Offerings 75

12.1.4 Partnerships 79

12.1.5 Asset Transactions 80

13 Recent Developments 82

13.1 License Awards 82

13.1.1 Apr 20, 2012: DNO International Signs Amended Concession Agreement For Saleh Area Offshore Ras Al Khaimah 82

13.2 Strategy and Business Expansion 83

13.2.1 Apr 05, 2012: Dialog Incorporates Dialog Systems International FZE 83

13.3 Other Significant Developments 83

13.3.1 Jul 23, 2012: Mubadala Petroleum Approves Manora Development In Thailand 83

13.3.2 Jul 17, 2012: CNPC’s Abu Dhabi Crude Oil Pipeline Becomes Operational 84

13.3.3 Jul 15, 2012: International Petroleum Investment Exports First Pipeline Oil Bypassing Hormuz Strait 84

13.3.4 Jul 06, 2012: H&W Completes SeaRose FPSO Dry-docking Project 84

13.3.5 Jun 19, 2012: Horizon Terminals Secures $100m Loan To Increase Jebel Ali Refinery Capacity And Build Jet Fuel Pipeline 85

13.3.6 Jun 08, 2012: Exillon Energy Provides May 2012 Operations Update 86

13.3.7 May 28, 2012: Horizon Terminals Announces Groundbreaking Ceremony Of LPG Terminal In Jebel Ali Free Zone, Dubai 86

13.3.8 Mar 28, 2012: Abu Dhabi Oil Refining To Complete Ruwais Refinery Expansion By Q1 2014 87

13.3.9 Jan 23, 2012: Dragon Oil Provides 2012 Outlook 87

13.3.10 Jan 23, 2012: Dragon Oil Provides 2011 Operations Update 88

13.4 New Contracts Announcements 90

13.4.1 Jun 11, 2012: Rotork Flow Control Technologies Specified For UAE Petroleum Storage Expansion Project 90

13.4.2 May 21, 2012: Rolls-Royce Wins $136m Contract From Dolphin Energy To Supply Industrial Trents 91

13.4.3 Apr 16, 2012: Punj Lloyd Wins Contract From Horizon Terminals To Build New Bulk Oil Terminal In Dubai 91

14 Appendix 92

14.1 Abbreviations 92

14.2 Methodology 92

14.2.1 Coverage 92

14.2.2 Secondary Research 93

14.2.3 Primary Research 93

14.3 Contact Us 93

14.4 Disclaimer 94

List of Tables

Table 1: United Arab Emirates, Historic and Forecast Production and Consumption of Oil, Thousand Barrels per Day, 2000-2020 10

Table 2: United Arab Emirates, Historic and Forecast Export and Import of Oil, Thousand Barrels per Day, 2000-2020 12

Table 3: United Arab Emirates, Historic Reserves of Crude Oil, Million Barrels, 2000-2011 14

Table 4: Middle East, Investment Benchmarking, Overall Country Rankings, Sep 2012 16

Table 5: Middle East, Investment Benchmarking, Oil Sector Performance, Sep 2012 17

Table 6: Middle East, Investment Benchmarking, Economic Performance, Sep 2012 20

Table 7: Middle East, Country Standings, Economic Performance, by FDI Confidence- GDP Growth & Production, Sep 2012 21

Table 8: Middle East, Investment Benchmarking, Socio-Political Performance, Sep 2012 22

Table 9: Middle East, Country Standings, Socio-Political Performance, by Exploration Growth-FDI Confidence and Governance Indices, Sep 2012 23

Table 10: United Arab Emirates, Crude Oil Key Statistics, 2011 25

Table 11: United Arab Emirates, Gross Crude Oil Production (%) by Type, 2003- 2011 26

Table 12: United Arab Emirates, Gross Crude Oil Production (MMBBLs), by Major Assets, 2003-2011 27

Table 13: United Arab Emirates, Market Share (%) of Key Companies based on Gross Equity Weighted Crude Oil Production, 2003-2011 28

Table 14: United Arab Emirates, Gross Crude Oil Production (MMBBLs), Forecast by Major Assets, 2012- 2016 29

Table 15: United Arab Emirates, Active Major Crude Oil Field Asset Details 30

Table 16: United Arab Emirates, Planned Major Crude Oil Field Asset Details 31

Table 17: United Arab Emirates FSO Industry, FSO Oil Production Capacities, Sep 2012 33

Table 18: United Arab Emirates FSO Industry, FSO Vessel Specifications, Sep 2012 33

Table 19: United Arab Emirates, Pipeline Key Statistics, Sep 2012 34

Table 20: United Arab Emirates, Crude Oil Pipeline Length by Company (Km), Sep 2012 34

Table 21: United Arab Emirates, Petroleum Product Pipeline Length by Company (Km), Sep 2012 35

Table 22: United Arab Emirates, Crude Oil Pipelines, Sep 2012 36

Table 23: United Arab Emirates, Petroleum Product Pipelines, Sep 2012 37

Table 24: United Arab Emirates, Refinery Key Statistics, Sep 2012 38

Table 25: United Arab Emirates, Total Refining Capacity (MMTPA), 2005-2016 38

Table 26: United Arab Emirates, Refining Capacity by Company (MMTPA), 2005-2016 39

Table 27: United Arab Emirates, Crude Distillation Unit Capacity (MMTPA), 2005-2016 40

Table 28: United Arab Emirates, Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit Capacity (MMTPA), 2005-2016 41

Table 29: United Arab Emirates, Hydrocracking Unit Capacity (MMTPA), 2005-2016 41

Table 30: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Key Statistics, Sep 2012 42

Table 31: United Arab Emirates, Total Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity (Thousand M3), 2005- 2016 42

Table 32: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity by Company (Thousand M3), 2005-2016 44

Table 33: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity (Thousand M3), 2005-2016 45

Table 34: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity (Thousand M3), 2005-2016 (Contd.1) 46

Table 35: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity (Thousand M3), 2005-2016 (Contd.2) 47

Table 36: OJSC Rosneft Oil Company, Key Facts 48

Table 37: OJSC Rosneft Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 52

Table 38: Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, Key Facts 59

Table 39: Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, SWOT Analysis 62

Table 40: Dana Gas PJSC, Key Facts 67

Table 41: PetroChina Plans To Acquire Oil And Gas Companies In Central Asia, East Africa, Australia And Canada 69

Table 42: MENA Hydrocarbons Completes Acquisition Of Mideast Energy For $0.85 Million 70

Table 43: Baghlan Group To Acquire 33.33% Interest In Bahar Energy From Rafi Oil 71

Table 44: DNO International Completes Acquisition Of MENA Operating Subsidiaries Of RAK Petroleum 71

Table 45: Exillon Energy Completes Private Placement Of Ordinary Shares For $150.3 Million 73

Table 46: Abu Dhabi National Energy Completes Private Placement Of 4.65% Bonds Due 2022 For $215.5 Million 75

Table 47: Dolphin Energy Completes Public Offering Of 5.5% Bonds Due 2021 For $1,300 Million 76

Table 48: Abu Dhabi National Energy Completes Private Placement Of 4.12% Notes For $750 Million 77

Table 49: Abu Dhabi National Energy Completes Private Placement Of 5.87% Notes For $750 Million 78

Table 50: Sonatrach Plans To Form Partnership With Shell And Exxon Mobil 79

Table 51: KNOC And GS Energy Form Joint Venture With ADNOC 80

Table 52: Fujairah Petroleum To Acquire 12% Stake In A Storage Terminal Project In Fujairah 80

Table 53: RAK Petroleum Acquires Additional 60% Interest In RAK B Field Offshore From RAK Gas 81

1.2 List of Figures

Figure 1: United Arab Emirates, Primary Energy Consumption Split by Fuel Type (%), 2011 9

Figure 2: United Arab Emirates, Oil Production And Consumption, Thousand Barrels Per Day, 2000-2020 11

Figure 3: United Arab Emirates, Oil Exports and Imports, Thousand Barrels Per Day, 2000-2020 13

Figure 4: United Arab Emirates, Crude Oil Reserves, Million Barrels, 2000-2011 14

Figure 5: Middle East, Country Standings, Oil Sector Performance, by Reserves-Exploration & Production, Sep 2012 17

Figure 6: Middle East, Country Standings, Oil Sector Performance, by Production-Consumption & Refining, Sep 2012 18

Figure 7: Middle East, Country Standings, Exploration Blocks Awarded, Sep 2012 19

Figure 8: Middle East, Country Standings, Economic Performance, by FDI Confidence- GDP Growth & Production, Sep 2012 21

Figure 9: Middle East, Country Standings, Socio-Political Performance, by Exploration Growth-FDI Confidence and Governance Indices, Sep 2012 23

Figure 10: United Arab Emirates, Crude Oil Assets Map, Sep 2012 25

Figure 11: United Arab Emirates, Gross Crude Oil Production (%) by Type, 2003-2011 26

Figure 12: United Arab Emirates, Market Share (%) of Key Companies based on Gross Equity Weighted Crude Oil Production, 2011 28

Figure 13: United Arab Emirates, Crude Oil Pipeline Length by Company (Km), Sep 2012 35

Figure 14: United Arab Emirates, Total Refining Capacity (MMTPA), 2005- 2016 39

Figure 15: United Arab Emirates, Refining Capacity by Company (MMTPA), 2011 40

Figure 16: United Arab Emirates, Total Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity (Thousand M3), 2005- 2016 43

Figure 17: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity Share by Area (%), 2011 43

Figure 18: United Arab Emirates, Oil and Chemicals Storage Capacity by Company (Thousand M3), 2005-2016 44

Companies mentioned

OJSC Rosneft Oil Company

Abu Dhabi National Oil Company

Dana Gas PJSC

To order this report:

Oil_and_Gas_energy Industry: United Arab Emirates Oil Markets, 2012

Contact Nicolas: nicolasbombourg@reportlinker.com
US: (805)-652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626

SOURCE Reportlinker

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